Bike Porn: Webbs x Deus vintage and classic auction

Galleries -

By

There’s times when we sincerely wish our ancestors had chosen to be 19th century English criminals or sheep farmers in search of greener pastures instead of Carolinian farmers or injuns. Next Wednesday’s auction of important vintage and collectable motorcycles held by Webbs at Deus Auckland is one of those times. Including bikes from 1904 to 1973, this is a seriously drool-worthy selection of important, beautiful motorcycles. Check out the gallery above and the video and complete catalog below. Why is it that Australians and Kiwis do old American and British bikes better than we do?

>

Webbs

  • wyatt

    Nice very nice!

  • Charlie

    Great post Wes, thx

  • Slick

    Who is selling and why?

  • Syke

    This morning started out really lousy. You just made it a whole lot better. I really, really, really want that Hurricane.

    And nothing touches vintage British iron . . . .

  • hoyt

    That Douglas is so cool.

  • http://www.webbs.co.nz Neil

    That Douglas belongs to Hugh Anderson(NZ), 60′s GP champion – rode for Suzuki. The Gold Star and beautiful Sunbeam are also Hugh’s. That model Douglas was the first motorcycle to circumnavigate Australia! All the machines are coming from loving places..

  • Telekom

    A beautiful catalogue, awesome bikes and very nice photography.

  • generic1776

    19th century English criminal? Oh, you must have Kiwi’s confused with the Australians.

    (All my Kiwi cousins are a bit prickly about being called criminals)

  • TommyManchuria

    The bikes up for auction are gems. It is always nice to see these beauties up for sale, changing hands and cycling through the global market, but I disagree with your last comment; “Why is it that Australians and Kiwis do old American and British bikes better than we do?” There’s no doubt Australia and NZ have some rare, quality bikes. Yet, we Yanks have a far greater diversity and collection of bikes than any other country in the world (mostly due to our global purchasing might) but nevertheless, you can’t deny that many of these and other oddballs show up on the block at the Vegas MidAmerica auction or any of the domestic vintage bike auction houses all year round. I work at a small shop in Richmond, VA that has restored and sold incredible examples of Crockers, Velocettes, Ariels, Broughs, and Indians that would make any Kiwi or Aussie green with envy. Just because a couple of great bikes go up for sale on the other side of the world doesn’t mean you’ve got to put your blinders on to the collection in your neighbor’s garage.