Zero upgrades 2011 model line with belt drive, faster charging

Dailies, Galleries -

By

For 2011, the Zero S and DS have been given refined looks, belt drive and an optional charging system that can slash recharge times from four hours to two. The smaller Zero X and MX stick with chain drive, but gain optional road ability and also benefit from the faster charging.

YouTube Preview Image

Zero DS and S:
Zero has also increased the capacity of the power packs by 12.5% to improve the motorcycles’ range. Among the other upgrades are more robust wheels, a new HB Performance braking system, tires with better grip, more robust hardware, new aggressive profile foot pegs and an integrated ignition switch and lock. Unique to the Zero S, it has been lowered by two inches to improve street handling and the new overall package gives it an eye-catching naked look.

Zero MX and X:
For the first time, the company will deliver street-legal configurations of both its trail and motocross dirt bikes, Zero X and Zero MX respectively. The ability to legally ride the electric off-road motorcycles on the street opens countless new possibilities for enthusiasts as well as a new market for Zero. Street-legal versions include additional components such as headlights, taillights, sidestands, dashes, sensors and different gearing.

Both the Zero X and Zero MX are better performing and more robust than ever before. They have stouter wheels, new tires, a more robust HB Performance braking system, new aggressive foot pegs and an integrated ignition switch and lock. Their motors are energized using a beautifully refined aluminum power pack that is highly durable and easy to swap in less than sixty seconds. To maximize control, Zero has customized each motorcycles’ suspension internals to give them a more fluid and compliant motion under rough conditions. Unique to only the Zero MX, the 2011 model uses a motor mounted Z-Force Air Induction System to cool its new and more powerful Agni motor. Designed to ride harder, faster and longer, it represents the most competitive dirt bike that Zero has released to consumers.

Zero S:

YouTube Preview Image

It has a range of 43 miles using the newly adopted MIC’s prescribed “Driving Range Test Procedure for Electric Motorcycles,” which is based on the EPA’s UDDS testing, and it has a homologated top speed of 67 MPH. The Zero S is designed for optimal performance off the line, in sharp turns and while navigating obstacles. Instant acceleration and lightweight design enable the Zero S to take on any city street, hill or obstacle, combining exhilaration with efficiency.

The Zero S is priced at $9,995. It is eligible for a 10% Federal tax credit which effectively reduces the price by $1,000 to a total of $8995. Some states and provinces offer additional incentives. The motorcycle can be purchased online now and will begin shipping in the United States during mid-March. The Zero S comes with a 2-year limited warranty.

Zero DS:

YouTube Preview Image

The Zero DS is priced at $10,495. It is eligible for a 10% Federal tax credit which effectively reduces the price by $1,040 to a total of $9,455. The motorcycle can be purchased online now and will begin shipping in the United States during mid-March. The Zero DS comes with a 2-year limited warranty.

Zero MX:

YouTube Preview Image

Designed for smooth landings, the Zero MX uses a newly-developed suspension system to absorb aggressive terrain. Incredibly tough and lightweight, the Zero MX combines the state-of-the-art Z-Force™ battery technology with an ultra-light frame design, making it agile and fast where it counts most. The custom suspension system makes the Zero MX highly responsive while maintaining an industry leading power-to-weight ratio. Easily swappable, riders can purchase an additional power pack to extend their riding. Silent and featuring a more powerful Forced Air Induction Agni motor, the Zero MX opens up a whole new world of riding possibilities.

The Zero MX starts at $9,495. A Federal tax credit can be applied to the street-legal versions of the off-road models if they are purchased with a second power pack. Some countries or states may offer incentives. The motorcycle can be purchased online now and will begin shipping in the United States during mid-March. The Zero MX comes with a 2-year limited warranty.

Zero X:

YouTube Preview Image

Custom valved suspension, direct drive gearing and weight optimized components allow riders to master demanding terrain. Lightweight, silent and quick, the Zero X opens up trail riding possibilities that would otherwise be out of the question. To extend ride times customers have the option to purchase an extra power pack that can be swapped with a quick pit stop.

The Zero X starts at $7,995. A Federal tax credit can be applied to the street-legal versions of the off-road models if they are purchased with a second power pack. Some countries or states may offer incentives. The motorcycle can be purchased online now and will begin shipping in the United States during mid-March. The Zero X comes with a 2-year limited warranty.

Zero

  • http://www.thisblueheaven.com Mark D

    So the maintenance on a belt-driven electric motorcycle would be…what exactly? Changing brake pads ever so often? Washing and waxing?

    The future is not only brighter, but has more free time on Sundays.

  • pavinguire

    Zero bikes are looking a little more ‘factory’ and a little less ‘garage built’ every year, for good or for ill; componentry looks very nice…

    • http://hellforleathermagazine.com Wes Siler

      I think that’s the idea here. As they move towards larger production numbers they can refine things a little more.

    • Chris Davis

      True, yet there are some oddities to the design like the “tank” and “radiator shroud” areas which look like they’re trying too hard to fit in with the ICE bikes. And what’s with the gap below the edge of the seat, exposing that odd horizontal extrusion? Then they have that under-designed black box of a power pack. It looks like they want to feature it, but it’s visually completely unworthy. The composition just seems so forced, like the engineers and designers aren’t of the same mind. I’d rather they embrace its nature rather than disguise it.

  • Myles

    How difficult is it to have a Coloradoan (?) buy the bike and sell it to you afterwards? Price goes from 10k to just over 5. For 5k I’d buy a zeroS in a heartbeat. I could probably wheel that thing into my office, people bring push bikes – why not?

  • markbvt

    Now if only they’d give the DS and dirt models normal wheel sizes so you actually have a decent selection of DOT knobby tires…

  • Liquidogged

    Looks sexy in red. You know what would be nice? Dealer network. Zero could sell a lot more of these if people could see them in person.

  • seanslides

    Well that’s neat. The belt drive should suck up less power and get rid of that erie chain noise at the same time.

  • incon

    Still needs a bigger range and a lower price tag. This would make a great second bike to get to work through the inner city roads and park lands. Another year or two out for me.

    • jp182

      i could probably stretch the range if i could get one used. I told myself years ago that i wouldn’t buy bikes new anymore.

  • Steve

    Nice incremental improvement, but I think the forthcoming Brammo Empulse is going to jump up and down on their heads.

    • http://hollywoodelectrics.com Harlan

      I would love to see the release of a 100mph/100mile bike this year, but as they say the proof is in the pudding. 7 months after the Empulse unveiling and still no sign of production. Zero says they will start delivering next month. Already Zero’s 2010 models outperform any Brammo bikes to date.

      • Devin

        I think the bikes start being practical at 100 mile range, 75 mph top speed.