Real Rides: Jason’s 916

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916 feature shot

A superbike is a motorcycle that is optimized for performance — they often mimic racing bikes in terms of looks and ride. They are designed and engineered for speed, cornering, braking and all-out acceleration. The Ducati 916 debuted in 1994 with a lot of fanfare due its new design and technological features. The Ducati 916 is one hell of a motorcycle, here is Jason Cormier’s Ducati 916 and why he rides it.

The Rider
Jason Cormier is a 27 year old jeweler from Moncton, New Brunswick who’s been riding since he was 17 years old. Jason started riding because it was cheaper to insure than a car — his first bike was a 1985 BMW K100RS — and he has yet to look back. Jason says “I’ve always loved the rush I get from riding, I find it a liberating experience that jars me out of my daily routine. I still get butterflies in my stomach every time I take the bike out, especially with the Ducati.”

The Bike
The Ducati 916 was introduced in 1994 as a 916cc L-twin, fuel-injected, 4 valves per-cylinder, desmodromic, liquid-cooled bike with a brake horsepower of 114 and a top speed of 160 miles an hour. It was welcomed because of its new design and technology that was a beautiful balance between function and form. The engine was upgraded from the Ducati 888 with a smaller and lighter frame, more engine displacement and a new engine management system. The exhausts were moved to under the seat for better aerodynamics and gave the motorcycle a better look overall. The swing arm was also redesigned into an alluring shape that was also stiffer than previous SSSAs.

More Jason and the 916.

Why He Rides a Ducati 916
Jason had always liked Ducatis and bought his 916 in 2006 on whim — picking it over a Ducati 900SS. He ended up trading in his Suzuki SV650 for the 916 without test riding it knowing that it had a rebuilt title and Jason considers it one of the best decisions of his life.

Jason says “I’ve grown to adore the bike way more than anyone sane can comprehend.” Jason says describing riding the 916 is difficult — it’s a nasty machine that demands your entire attention and won’t accept any half-assed measures at controlling it. Jason says riding the bike properly “rewards you with amazing feedback with handling that is rock-solid” with some amazing noise. He’s had a lot of “old Ducati issues” — bad electronics, strange gremlins, flaking rockers — yet he’s never been stranded on the side of the road. Seven years later he has over 30,000 miles on it, which he thinks is too low. He hopes one day to be one of those “lunatics” with a 100,000 miles on a Ducati 916.

Want to see your bike on HFL? Email Info@RideApart.com with a few pics and words and, if we like it, we’ll contact you about creating a story.

  • HammerheadFistpunch

    Tell me about those forks.

    • http://www.facebook.com/jason.e.cormier Jason Evariste Cormier

      Stock Showas the previous owner had anodized. I’ve recently replaced them with a set of rebuilt stockers (without the ugly faux Ohlins colour) because the stanchions were worn out and the damping was shot.

      • HammerheadFistpunch

        Thanks! That was driving me crazy. Thought you’d swapped them for GSXRs or something..color just didn’t look right. ;)

  • http://twitter.com/TheVeeTwin Damo Von Maciel

    Nice write up. Doing 30k on a 916 is no easy feat. The 916, 996 and 998 have some of the most harsh/race oriented ergos I have even experienced on a street bike.

    • Brian Simmons

      Don’t forget the 748 in your list (what I ride). They were made to be ridden at 50 mph+. They may be painful on your wrists when you poodle around town on one, but the setup is perfect once you’re up to speed with the wind holding your weight up in a neutral position.

      • http://twitter.com/TheVeeTwin Damo Von Maciel

        I love the 748/916 era. One of these days when a deal comes along I will probably grab one.

  • http://www.facebook.com/markgardiner Mark Gardiner

    As a long-time resident of nearby Sackville, NB, I’m pumped to see reader/bike from Moncton. Great town! Jason,.. no dual-sport? I spent happy hours exploring rutted dirt roads along the bay, on my vintage Yamaha XT500. Highly recommended!

    • http://www.facebook.com/jason.e.cormier Jason Evariste Cormier

      Hi Mark! They made a small mistake, I’m from Moncton but I live in Montreal. So I don’t do much riding in NB anymore! Never been into dirt I’m afraid.

  • http://twitter.com/Adventure1199 AntiHero

    I was like–hey, I know a guy that looks just like that who owns a 916! LOL. It’s YOU! Good stuff. Hope all is well my friend!

  • http://profiles.google.com/mugget mugget man

    Traded an SV650 for a 916? Good deal!

    • http://www.facebook.com/jason.e.cormier Jason Evariste Cormier

      They gave me a really fair value on my SV too, in spite of it having a ridiculous amount of mods (like a complete GSXR front end). I think they were happy to unload the 916.

      • http://profiles.google.com/mugget mugget man

        I wonder if I could get a trade for my K6 Gixxer 1000 on a 916… “one of those lunatics with 100,000 miles on a 916″… has a nice ring to it!

  • http://www.facebook.com/electricbike Troy Rank

    I love these features. Every time I see a bike parked somewhere, like this 916, and I want to know the back story on the bike and the rider. Keep it up!

  • George Roberts

    Good on you for trying to live with that cantankerous beast. It must be like living with a Bond girl… half-the time she’s trying to love you and half the time she’s trying to kill you.

  • http://twitter.com/GaneshBell Ganesh Bell

    The best looking bike of all time – it is amazing how god it looks in 2013 – 20 years after the original. I actually like the gold forks on it.. Here is my 996 monoposto converted to a biposto – I split mile on it with my other bikes but can never sell it

  • Nicholas Joel

    Hey Jason! I’m actually 19 and I ride a 916 as well! Its really hard to ride it around town or use it daily, any suggestions to improve the ride quality in and around town?