Meet Todd Blubaugh

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todd

A fixture in Seattle’s youth motorcycle scene, Todd Blubaugh takes photos, builds bikes and designs stuff. He’s a neat dude and a good friend of ours. Here, denim brand Tellason follows him around his hometown with a video camera.

  • http://www.facebook.com/malukas Michael Lukas

    Todd was a neighbor in an artist loft building in Seattle, last time I saw him I was helping unload his mangled harley after a crash with a cager making a left turn. Good to see him out of those casts and back at it. For those interested take a look at twinlinemotorcycles.com, they make some gorgeous cafe racers though it was the DR350 in the back I was lusting over.

    • http://www.facebook.com/electricbike Troy Rank

      I think you mean RD350, unless you’re into cafe racer dualsports :)

      • http://www.facebook.com/malukas Michael Lukas

        It was a DR in the back waiting for repairs, not one of their ultra trick projects. Small dual sports for me, and the gaudier the 80s colour scheme the better.

        • http://www.facebook.com/jeff.tower.525 Jeff Tower

          The shop now owns the DR. I need to get a mechanics lean on it so i can sell it.

          • http://www.facebook.com/malukas Michael Lukas

            Well I’d love to take it off your hands, but unfortunately am now back across the country for school. Hope you can find it a good home, those bikes are hard to come by on the east coast.

            • http://www.facebook.com/todd.blubaugh Todd Blubaugh

              I’m just happy Grant thinks I’m a youth! Michael, tell your folks I say hello and fall by the shop next time you’re in town, eh?

        • http://www.facebook.com/electricbike Troy Rank

          ahh ;)

  • yipY

    It’s a sad and insidious trend that the youngs have nothing to offer the future other than regurgitated impressions of others past efforts.The good old days did not exist,it is myth.Imitation of an illusion? Maybe well be.

    • http://profiles.google.com/mugget mugget man

      For once, I agree with you.

      People like Maarten Janssens and Nigel Petrie on the other hand… the world could use a lot more of doers like them.

    • Kr Tong

      “It’s a sad and insidious trend that the youngs have nothing to offer the future other than regurgitated impressions of others past efforts”

      You may like to rephrase that

      “It’s a sad and insidious trend that the youngs have nothing to offer me.”

      The younger gen’s doing just fine with what they have. I think you should respect the reusage of existing materials into making new what the old generations put out with the trash. That’s a definite disinction between my generation and my parent’s. We’re not the baby boomer, infinite credit, consumers of planned obsolescence, infinite economic growth, yadda yadda. Make sense now?

      • yipY

        “It’s a sad and insidious trend that
        the youngs have nothing to offer me.”

        More to the point they have little to offer themselves:no future and only non-linear snippets of other eras and other lives to play dress-up and pretend in.Phenomenal group think conservatism combined with a faux summer of peace love dove delusion.
        When I see brass or granite smart phones with a service life of at least ten years that charge from the radiated heat from a skinny butt I’ll see a small attempt at avoiding scant life products.I can’t see there is much recycling of the discarded in making wheeled fashion items to amuse bored café customers,its just F-F-F-Fa–:fashion.Motorcycling used to be a pastime of definition,now it’s often like a costume play on cable.

        The western world has had a speculative bubble economy
        for at least three hundred years and it ain’t changing any time soon.Infinite credit is how the world rolls:find a way to jump the cart.

        • Kr Tong

          “When I see brass or granite smart phones with a service life of at least ten years that charge from the radiated heat from a skinny butt I’ll see a small attempt at avoiding scant life products.”

          you don’t get it. It’s about NOT building another, “better” phone. Its about realizing you can do everything with the one you already have.

    • http://www.facebook.com/goncalofern Gonçalo Fernandes

      Spoken like a true cynic. As an official member, I can tell you the younger generation IS doing just fine…considering the massive setback the former generation has handed to us. Don’t pity us. We have taken on the business world and are looking to find new ways of expressing our creativity. That may mean looking at the bikes of our fathers and finding inspiration. To you it may be an illusion, but we find nostalgia and romance in these machines because they were at one time the identity of our heroes.
      As I restore my father’s 1969 Honda CB450 bomber, yes, the nostalgia I imagine may be an illusion, but I can only hope that one day my son looks at my old, rusty, 2011 Triumph Street Triple R in the garage and is inspired by the same illusion to lovingly restore it as I have done.

      • yipY

        “massive setback the former generation has handed to
        us” I pity none ‘cept for people who blame others for their own
        state.Taking on the business world,by becoming the business world?Expressing creativity by imitation and emulation with a mirror?.Bravely going forward by looking backward.Nostaglia and romance?It’s all very Freudian guy:tell me about your father(wait,you have.).Like Devo said:”The beginning was the end,of everything”.

        • Luke Mazza

          Maybe people are looking backward because the view forward as defined by the motorcycle industry isn’t very interesting. Some serious cultural ennui is about. This IS of generation of less means, no matter who you want to put the blame on. (hint: it’s hard to take a hot potato handed to you and turn it into lemonade no matter how many bootstraps you have to pull on). Let’s be honest, the custom bikes of the past were pretty much “modern” relatively speaking. To create something truly modern today you have to work within a landscape of multi-million dollar CNC machines, traction control, dynamic dampening suspensions, and carbon fiber, and in an economy like this one you’re just not going to get all that far. Reworking the past is a creative solution to a well-defined problem.

          Motorcycling used to be a “pastime of definition”? I thought you had a problem with nostalgia and romanticism. It’s always been in large part about f-f-f-f-fashion. Just look at the people known for bringing motorcycles in the public’s attention historically. James Dean, Steve McQueen, Marlon Brando… Where is the equivalent today? I don’t see anything like a unified wave of poserdom and it seems plenty grass roots to me.

    • Joel Cotterell

      A sad and insidious trend that didn’t exist back in the good old days, right?

  • http://www.facebook.com/jesse.c.perry Jesse Perry

    Wow, that mill outside of the Ninja packaging looks great. There are days I miss my EX500, but I know she is being ridden well and loved, so I tell myself I’m okay with it.

  • yipY

    The advance I’d like to see is young perception,reaction and unique creative output.Regurgitation is the way of the albatross.

  • http://www.facebook.com/scottpargett Scott Pargett

    I know Todd personally, great dude. Great video.