2013 EICMA: 2014 Honda NC750X — First Official Photos and Specs

News -

By

2014 Honda NC750X

More 2013 EICMA News >>

As exclusively revealed by RideApart last week, the 2014 Honda NC750X is growing in capacity to separate itself better from Honda’s own 500 range. The larger motor adds 7 bhp and 6 lb.-ft.of torque, while the additional flexibility makes possible taller gearing for more relaxed highway cruising.

The NC’s motor is growing by 75 cc, taking it from 670 to 745 cc thanks to a 4 mm increase in bore, taking the engine out to a 77 x 80mm bore and stroke. Additionally, Honda is adding a second balancer shaft to reduce high-rev vibrations even further. Power increases from 47 bhp to 54 bhp at 6,250 rpm and torque grows from 44 lb.-ft. to an even 50 at 4,750 rpm. 90 percent of that torque should still be available from 1,500 rpm, giving the engine its unique, low to mid-range performance. Driven a Diesel car? The NC’s motor feels similar.

2014 NC750X
2014 Honda NC750X Dash.

As stated above, that extra capacity makes possible taller gearing. Ratios increase by six percent through gears 1-5, while 6th lengthens by 3 percent. This is carried out without negatively impacting acceleration. In fact, Honda says the new bike accelerates faster, despite the longer gears.

As on the 2014 Honda CBR300R, a new exhaust adds both back pressure and a sound that is said to deliver, “a more characterful beat.”

Honda NC750X
2014 Honda NC750X on the road.

Fuel economy should remain unaltered by the additional capacity. The NC750X is said to deliver 68 mpg in the typically more optimistic World Motorcycle Test Cycle, while the NC700X manages 64 mpg in the more conservative EPA test cycle.

As we told you last week, all-up wet weight grows 10 lbs to 482 lbs. Blame the balancer shaft and new exhaust. You won’t feel that increase, the NC already hides its weight almost completely thanks to an exceptionally low center of gravity and very slim seat.

No word yet on American availability, but we’d expect the 750 to replace the 700 soon.

More 2013 EICMA News >>

Related Links:
Why The NC Is Awesome: 2013 Honda NC700X Review
Its Biggest Competition: Honda CB500X Review
Honda’s New V4 Cruiser: Honda CTX1300 — First Official Photos and Specs

  • 200 Fathoms

    Need to fix the photo label. Still says NC700X.

    • http://www.RideApart.com/ Jen Degtjarewsky

      Handled

  • Daniel

    pic fail?

    • http://www.RideApart.com/ Jen Degtjarewsky

      Total fail – we got it fixed though

  • Jack McLovin

    Hopefully this will stop people saying it’s half a Fit motor. Yes of course they cut a timing belt driven i-vtec motor with a separate transmission in half to create a chain driven completely different valvetrain motor and typical motorcycle transmission*. You know half a Fit motor. It’s probably a coincidence the thing has half the displacement of a Fit, and now it doesn’t anymore. That’s probably all it ever had in common with the car.

    • Dirtymopwater

      They say that because NC700X’s motor has the exact same bore and stroke (73mm x 80mm) as the L13A motor in some versions of the Honda Fit, a choice which is the main contributor to the NC’s higher torque and lower redline than typical motorcycle engines.

      • Jack McLovin

        I know why they say it but they mean it as if Honda cut a Fit motor in half to make the NC motor. And if all it takes is identical numbers than literally all 600′s have the exact same motor.

        • Dirtymopwater

          Yeah that’s true. They should clarify what aspect of the motor they are referring to. It’s also just a convenient (albeit misleading) way to give readers a mental image.

  • Stephen Mears

    I love how the check engine light is the same exact small-block profile standard for autos. Federally mandated?

    • Justin McClintock

      I’m disappointed it HAS a check engine light.

  • Justin McClintock

    I’d still rather have a DL650. But at least Honda’s making this more interesting. Now I might not sell it immediately if somebody gave me one.

    • Stuki

      INstead of boring out the old engine, Big H should have followed current fashion and added a third cylinder. At liter bike torque levels, the truncated redline wouldn’t seem nearly as restrictive as on a middleweight

  • Julian

    For those in the USA, I hope Honda fit ABS throughout the range, a pity Honda have not fitted a larger fuel tank with access to the filler cap without having to lift the seat!
    Sometimes you’re a long way from a fill-up, even in Europe!—— or have they?

  • John

    Shaft drive would have completed it.

    • grindz145

      The lack of shaft drive is my only real hesitation too. But I think we’re in the minority.

      • Goose

        First, this is really exciting. I rented an NC700 last summer and loved it but wanted a bit more power, here it is. If this thing doesn’t come to America I may have to hold my breath until my face turns blue or go picket American Honda.

        Second, I’d also prefer a shaft or Kevlar belt but modern O-ring chains and “chain wax” or Dupont Teflon lube is way better than the old days. Longer life, fewer adjustments and less mess than the bad old days. Not my first choice but I can live with it.

        Goose

        • John

          I have a hard time believing that the power difference is in any way significant. The new balancing system, however, might be.

          • Stuki

            In my experience, under 60-70HP, any added HP is very noticeable. Above that, things start getting more academic for most kids of driving. 15% added oomph on a bike where you very, very often peg the throttle, is not irrelevant.

            • John

              But it’s not that much, it’s half that. Plus more weight, plus higher gearing. They say it accelerates faster, but I bet not MUCH faster. What I’m saying is that it really shouldn’t be a significant factor in desirability given that it’s HP is well below many other bikes. The thing that makes it desirable is price, versatilety, economy, storage. Making it smoother will help. Still, I’m going to start scouting the used market for the 700 soon, I hope.

          • Goose

            More than 10% more HP with 2% more weight will definitely be noticeable.

            Goose

            • John

              In the UK maybe, but in the US, it’s more like a 6% increase in power, along with taller gearing. The fact that it accelerates faster is as likely because you can hit speed with one less shift. I mean, it’s probably noticeable, but it’s not a game changer and anyone who says “51hp, not enough, but oh, wait, now it has 54, I’m IN!!!” is a little nuts.

              • Goose

                I’m pretty much assuming the information in the post is confused. In the US the 47 HP is for the DCT version, the 6-speed is rated at 52 HP. Only the 6-Speed can be run on the dyno but they show an actual 45 to 48 HP. I’m assuming the 47 to 54 is for the DCT version, that would put the 6-speed into the upper fifties. This is just my guess.

                Leaving my opinions, the engine is is more than 10% bigger, that should result in at least 10% more power.

                We’ll see when the new bike gets in the hands of non-Honda employes. Until then we’re all just guessing.

                Goose

        • John Westendorp

          I’m going with the assumption that a 10% hike in displacement is going to be very noticeable on this bike. Even if it doesn’t make much difference in the HP department, which I think it will, the biggest deal about this bike is the torque and torque spread. Torque is golden! This is only going to help. I’ve driven the NC and even though it’s lower hp than others in it’s class the torque makes up for it. Depends on preference…while not as “fun” or “sporty” perhaps as a higher horse bike, personally I like the feel of having tractor-like-torque propelling me at 1000 rpm.

    • Julian

      Shaft drive would ruin the economy, belt drive perhaps or enclose the chain + chain oiler

      • John

        I really doubt that. I’ve had two shaft bikes that got pretty darned good fuel mileage. My VT500 got better mileage than my Hawk GT 650. 60+ versus low 50s.

        • Julian

          I can’t debate the point ‘cos I’m no engineer, it’s something I’ve read in an article at some time that shaft drive soaked up power & there fore used more fuel, my BMW 1100 returned 45/50 mpg the yamaha TDM900a (chain) 55/65 mpg.Apart from the economy angle, there is the cost angle, a shaft driven NC750x would be a lot more expensive! Never mind, lets see what the experts have to say, looking forward to the road tests and reviews.

          • John

            Well, I’m just saying, based unscientifically on what I’ve owned, there are a ton of things more impacting than the final drive. I wouldn’t expect it to be more than about 5% difference. It obviously didn’t kill the mileage on my Sabre or my Ascot which do as well as most chain bikes do, give or take.

            Also, they said the big weight increase is from a new counterbalancing system, though they might add ABS on the base model to make a price increase seem warranted.

            Also, there have been plenty of inexpensive Hondas that have had shaft. My Ascot retailed for $2800 as I recall. The Sabre with shaft was less than the Interceptor without. Maybe an extra couple $hundred.

            • John Westendorp

              Julian makes a good point though…all other factors being equal (which they aren’t) shaft drive squanders more energy in transmission to the back wheel….it’s not as efficient as chain drive. I don’t know where belt drive fits in though…I’ve often wondered why we don’t get more belt driven bikes…they’re quieter and a lot less mess. Maybe they’re just not as durable?

  • Brett Lewis

    Just did the math. From the 700′s peak #’s, 15% increase in hp, and 14% increase in torque. I would take that with a 2% weight penalty.

    • Chris Davis

      Oddly half of the other sources say the 700 had 51 hp, 45 lb-ft. Strange that it grew more (or same-ish?) torques than horses from boring it out and that the peaks stayed at the same RPM.

  • Ben Barbeau

    WHAT!?!?! ONLY a 1 page article????

  • Kenneth

    Another U.S. motorcycling website is saying that Honda says this will be a European update, and not for the U.S.
    What’s the latest, Wes?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1736096319 Gregory Reynold Faulkner

    I’ve got a CTX700. Never mind all-out performance and acceleration. I think a little power boost, combined with taller gears would make it a more refined ride. It would be nice not to have to upshift so quickly in town, and the herky jerky that goes on when you don’t defuel, throttle and clutch just perfectly, would likely be solved with taller gears. This bike definitely needs taller gears, especially the first four, unless you’re buying this bike to drag race, and if so, you’ve chosen the wrong bike anyway. I don’t understand why everyone is not just blown away by a 745 cc, 500 lb motorcycle that achieves 64 mpg. I’m getting 75+ in the summer with the standard shift. Does mpg not mean anything to mc enthusiasts. Shaft drive would affect the economy in two ways: mpg and cost. Remember, this is a sub $8,000 bike, but not if it becomes a shaft drive.

  • Gabe

    Just found out from Honda that the 2014 U.S. model is going to stay at 700cc’s.

  • 200 Fathoms

    It seems like the one of the closest competitors would be Honda’s own CB500X. Can anyone comment on that contrast?