Why You Shouldn’t Feel Bad About Taking Up An Entire Parking Spot

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Why You Shouldn’t Feel Bad About Taking Up An Entire Parking Spot

Photo by Mixtography

In parking lots, motorcycles are a source of great frustration for automotive drivers. Even though your motorcycle is smaller than a car and can fit almost anywhere, you should not feel bad taking up an entire spot. Here’s why.

The Dilemma:

Motorcyclists are faced with a choice almost every time they reach a destination, to take up an entire spot or to not take up an entire spot.  Since motorcycles are small and maneuverable, it is often easy to find a place in a parking lot or on the street that is out of the way and won’t deprive a poor soul in an automobile their ideal parking space. It is safe to assume that like most people in the world, you don’t strive to make others lives more difficult than they already are, but at the same time you don’t want to jeopardize the wellbeing of your bike, as parking outside of a designated space can lead to tickets, your bike being knocked over, or much worse.

Why You Shouldn’t Feel Bad About Taking Up An Entire Parking Spot
Parking lines

Photo by Radcliffe Dacanay

Your Options:

You have a two (sometimes three) options. Number one is to look for an alternative place to park your bike and hope it is adequately out of the way. Option number two is to shamelessly place your two-wheeled beauty between the painted lines of a parking space. The third option is parking your bike in a designated motorcycle area, which are often few and far between.

The Right Choice:

Park in a parking spot. If there are no designated motorcycle areas or a place that is clearly out of the way, do not think twice about parking in a full-sized spot. No matter how frustrated future parking lot patrons may be by your choice, they will live to park another day and so will your bike.

Why You Shouldn’t Feel Bad About Taking Up An Entire Parking Spot
Motorcycle parking only

Photo by Elliott Brown

Why You Shouldn’t Feel Bad:

As someone who rides a motorcycle you know how distracted people can be on the road, this goes double for when they are in parking lots. Odds are, a driver preoccupied with finding their own parking space will not see a bike parked outside of a traditional spot. What it comes down to is protecting your investment. Is it worth risking something you’ve spent thousands of dollars on, just to make sure you don’t annoy a stranger in a parking lot? No way. It doesn’t matter how much of a rush someone else is in, if it means keeping your bike out of harms way, by all means proudly take up an entire spot.

Plus, if you leave enough room, at least one more motorcyclist can park their bike in the spot which leaves more spaces for people in cars. We all win!

Why You Shouldn’t Feel Bad About Taking Up An Entire Parking Spot
Parked motorcycles

Photo by Craig Howell

Something to Remember:

For whatever reason, parking lots tend to bring out some pretty questionable qualities in people. If a distraught driver confronts you about your parking, be the better person and remember in that situation you are playing ambassador for everyone who rides a motorcycle. Feel free to explain the logic behind your parking. No matter how unpleasant an interaction with an angry driver may be, you can always take comfort in knowing that your motorcycle is safe and sound in its very own parking spot.

So tell us, what kind of parking etiquette do you follow?

  • Braden

    I know that bike and that place in the top photo. Was this image picked randomly off teh internetz? Columbia, SC has shown up a few times now in article photos.

    • Justin McClintock

      Columbia has palm trees downtown?

      EDIT: Checked google maps and yup, there’s 1!

      • Braden

        It’s on the state flag so we figured we had to have at least one somewhere. Otherwise it would just be silly.

        • Justin McClintock

          I knew they grew in Charleston, I just didn’t know they’d survive the winter in Columbia. You learn something every day!

      • Harve Mil

        Some palms can hack cold much better than you’d think, esp if you take measures during cold snaps.

        http://www.florida-palm-trees.com/cold-hardy-palm-trees/

        http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/

      • Jake Isbill

        It’s not a Palm tree. It is the majestic Palmetto tree.

    • Blake Bryce

      Kind of odd seeing a hometown bike on a west coast blog.

    • Justin P. Kuhns

      My bike’s soul has been stolen.

    • Jake Isbill

      Represent the Palmetto State!!! (843) 4 LYFE

  • Guy Simmonds

    I always try to line up my front/back wheel (whichever is closest to the “opening” of the spot) with the wheels of the cars in the spots adjacent to me, so drivers can see that the spot is occupied before they try to back in there. If you leave enough room at the sides, other bikes can still squeeze in, but it – potentially – saves some headaches further down the line.

    • Justin McClintock

      I pretty much do the same, making sure I park just off center enough to get another bike in there should one come along. I’ve witnessed firsthand (thankfully not to my bike) what can happen to a bike when you pull all the way in and an inattentive driver wants that spot. Ironically, if the guy had simply parked in the same spot as me, his bike wouldn’t have wound up on its side.

    • http://www.eastwestbrothersgarage.com/ East-West Brothers Garage

      I frequently do the same in an effort to make the bike more visible. When there is motorcycle parking, I will use that, but when there is not, I have no issue taking up a full spot, leaving enough room for at least one other bike to squeeze in.

      So while this addresses parking lot parking, street parking is a different story. I primarily park perpendicular to the curb to allow as many as 4 or 5 bikes to share the single space that fits a regular car.

      • Guy Simmonds

        In both my home city and the city that I now live in, almost all street-side parking is on a permit system, limiting the use of spaces to residents from particular parts of town, or limiting the time period that you can use a space for. Thankfully, someone saw sense, and permit restrictions are waived for bikes – so long as they’re parked perpendicular to the curb. Absolutely brilliant. Means I can park almost anywhere in the city.

  • runnermatt

    If there is available motorcycle parking I would personally park there. I”ve never been anywhere on my bike that had motorcycle parking. I”ve considered parking to one side of a space, but always figured a car driver would see my bike until after the crunched it, so I park straight in the middle.

    If someone confronts me about it I’ll tell them, “We wouldn’t be having this conversation if I drove my car.”

  • Dan

    Whose bike is that on the cover shot? Absolutely gorgeous. Looks like a Sport 1000 with a Paul Smart-style fairing. Powdercoating on the swingarm is a nice touch, too.

    • Clint Keener

      It’s a stock Ducati Sport 1000

    • Justin P. Kuhns

      It’s actually mine. Braden, one of the guest bloggers on the site, texted me this morning and asked me, as well. In this pic it was still a stock Ducati Sport 1000S. It’s had a few “my girlfriend would kill me if she knew how much this was” mods since then though.

      • Dan

        Awesome man. Sport 1000 is on the short list of obvious future-classic bikes from the last 10 years. Got a shot of how it sits now (post-mod)?

        • Justin P. Kuhns

          Just moved. Don’t have a garage yet. Let’s play spot the mods from a crappy cell phone pic.

  • Disqusdmnj

    I have an even-smaller-than-a-motorcycle Honda PCX150 scooter, and will usually park in a faraway spot that’s easily visible and probably not sought after. I do the same as Guy and pull up to the entrance of the spot so if someone does park next to me, a driver will see that something is in the spot before turning into it. That’s what I want motorcyclists to do when I’m in the car, so it’s the least I can do when I’m the one on the bike.

  • Jack Meoph

    In San Luis Obispo, CA, only one MC is allowed per parking space. If another MC parks there, both will get tickets. Also there is no parking for MC’s in the city parking structures. Whoever is in charge up there hates motorcyclists. OTOH, in Santa Barbara, CA. parking in the parking structures is free for MC’s, and there is usually a space up front that MC’s can use to park. And they don’t care if MC’s park in the small spaces marked off before the actual parking spaces are lined out. It’s strange how these two cities perceive motorcyclists. SLO makes you feel unwelcome, and SB makes you feel special.

    I also park in parking spaces with my bike out towards the parking lot, so that someone sees that the space is occupied and doesn’t just ram their car into the parking space and then realize that there is an MC in there. As we all know, even a small strike or tip over can cause major $$$$$ damage to an MC. And I don’t ever feel bad about taking up a full parking space.

    • Paul Elliot

      Actually, there IS motorcycle parking in at least one of the downtown parking garages in SLO. I have parked there more than once, it is a separate section on the ground floor. Bikes are not allowed on the upper levels.

      • Adam

        Came in here to say this…if I recall correctly the spaces were outside on the street were the meters got you 90 minutes free then you paid after that. Something like that. The older structure on Palm. I lived there years ago but havent ridden there.

    • stever

      That’s because San Luis Obispo isn’t a town; it’s a parasite. I went to infraction court for a bicycle ticket (riding a block on the sidewalk to avoid speeding cars on Highway 1) and watched a guy pay a $500 noise fine for having a barbecue at 5pm on a Saturday afternoon.

      The Quality Inn and Suites in SLO does motorcyclists right, though. Show up on a bike and get $30 off and an invitation to park under the overhang by the main entrance. Then, free beer and wine happy hour. A+ operation.

      • Adam

        Well, crap like that happens when one of the guys on the City Council owns one of the (dozen or so) bars downtown proposes and passes an ordinance tripling the noise fine so people stop having house parties and come to his bar.

        On the topic of jerk off rules, in a town that has no transit at night and very limited cab service (45+ minute wait at midnight) they made the whole downtown area no parking 2:30am-5am. It is like they WANT you to drink and drive.

        People walking away from downtown after 11pm on get hassled by the police looking to write drunk in public tickets.

        No skateboarding (sidewalk or in the street) downtown. Also restricted elsewhere.

        They have some sort of leaf blower restriction. Andy Rooney made fun of it. The most crotchety man ever made fun of it.

        No drive throughs.

        Nice weather though. I think Tuesday night you can still get good beer for a couple bucks at a couple bars.

  • MichaelEhrgott

    Luckily in Sacramento there are lots of motorcycle only spots. If it’s a quick in and out or a huge department store sidewalk I’ll park up there. Never gotten a ticket for that yet. The parking security usually dont mind.

  • markbvt

    We have no reason to feel guilty taking up a parking spot. Our motorcycles are plated, registered motor vehicles on which we’ve paid taxes, just like Mrs. Soccer Mom’s giant SUV. If someone has a problem with me taking up a parking space with my motorcycle, I’ll point this out to them and ask them if they would complain about someone taking up a parking space with a Smart car.

    That said, if I’m riding with other people, we’ll generally try to share parking spaces instead of each taking our own. But if I’m solo, I won’t think twice about it, unless of course there are actual motorcycle spots.

    • Mykola

      I had this ‘discussion’ with an audibly annoyed person at a hardware store parking lot a couple weeks ago, but I added that I am forced to wait in the congestion all their big heavy single-occupant vehicles create and breathe their exhaust too, so I wasn’t going to feel bad about taking up an entire spot.

  • William Connor

    I park in a parking spot. I then remind them that motorcycles require insurance, pay registration fees, and are licensed to be ridden on the roads. Lastly I point out that motorcycles have been around just as long cars and frankly they should stop taking motorcycle parking. (The first car and motorcycle is a highly argued fact so the timelines over lap depending on who says they were first that day. Both became useful in the late 1880′s.)

  • Brian

    I had an instance where I was at a Hotel for a meeting ( charity event and there we were a part of a crew of motorcyclists to perform support functions for the event), and the parking ( which was run like it was a seperate entity) decided to uphold Motorcycles as seperate vehicles. As such we tried to negotiate with him to try and pay per spot with the idea of putting 4 bikes in each spot, but it was to no avail. So when he charged us per vehicle, we parked every bike in a seperate spot in such a way that other cars could not be slid in and parked between the bikes ( a tactic I have seen done before). The manager was less than pleased when he found out afterward what had transpired when he had no room for hotel guests staying there because of the lack of forethought by the attendant. That same manager had the audacity to come into the meeting and ask our crew captain if we could move our bikes. SHE happened to have been chatting with a friend of hers who was the catering manager with the hotels events coordination staff. She then promptly told the parking manager a very firm no, and stated that when we paid for our individual motorcycles to park the way that we were forced to, under those circumstances we were entitled to the exact same benefits that would be guaranteed to a car parking patron. She then asked if he would have asked a hotel guest to move their car under a similar circumstance, to which he wanted to waffle, and she pressed him for a yes or no answer, to which she got a “no”. She then said, very well then, that’s my answer, and if you have a problem with it, I will be more than glad to walk over with you to the hotel general manager to get full refund for ALL of the bikes in your lot, as well as a guarantee of safety for our vehicles from damage by the hotel as well as a format of grievance for to seek resolution up to if not including the termination of your job.He immediately backed down and all was left as it were.

    • Dave Brumley

      She is awesome. More power to her!

  • JP

    I’ve never thought twice about parking in a parking spot, nor have I ever received any dirty looks or abuse about it.

    The only times I have not parked in the parking lot is when I pull on up the sidewalk and just park next to the building. You have to judge when this acceptable behavior obviously.

  • imprezive

    The only time I disagree is in a parking structure. There are almost always wide areas in the corners that aren’t parking spaces but have plenty of room for bikes. As long as there isn’t a no parking sign you should be good to go. Usually you will find other bikes parked in similar spots to let you know it’s ok. In a street level parking lot I always park in a space and towards the front so cars can see me.

    • sharper86

      If only the parking lot managers would give you discounted parking. My office’s parking managers still charge me the full $16/day

      • imprezive

        That really sucks. My work not only has designated motorcycle parking but we get $100/mo for riding and saving a parking space.

    • M.A.

      Just FYI, in most countries If a parking structure collapses, catches fire or anything that damaged the vehicles inside happened, their insurance will NOT cover any vehicle parked outside of a delimited proper parking spot.
      IE, my friends bike in one of those spaces you mentioned about year ago.

      • imprezive

        I never would have thought of that. Good to know.

  • pedro

    Since (in my country) I pay as much taxes as a small car, I should have the same right to a parking place as a car.

  • Steven Mansour

    There are motorcyclists who feel bad for parking their registered, licensed bike in a parking spot? What about big SUVs carrying only one person? Or very small cars? The parking spot is for the person to park their vehicle, whatever it may be. This article is unnecessary.

    • John

      Right, because people love people who drive giant SUVs and Hummer is the #1 selling new vehicle now.

      • Adam Spano

        You must not live in the midwest.

  • phoebegoesvroom

    If there’s dedicated motorcycle parking, I use it. If not, I use a normal parking space, but I try to put my bike closer to the opening of it so someone doesn’t think it’s an open space and plow right into my bike >.<

  • Bellaert Jeffrey

    Where I live (Belgium) it is ok to park on the sidewalk as long as you leave enough room for pedestrians to pass easily in both directions. I assume it’s the same in the neighboring countries. So I look if it’s easy to get off or on the sidewalk and park it in such a way it bothers as less people as possible. As a bonus you don’t need to pay a parking ticket. If it is to much hassle you can always take a car spot. Lets just say you use common sense when you place it on a foopath.

    • Eduard

      Its the same thing in Germany and in most of the UK. It’s more or less an unwritten law. When I lived in the US I initially kept looking for motorcycle parking spots, but could rarely find any. In lots of EU countries there are free motorcycle parking spaces even in areas where car-drivers have to pay. This also encourages people to take their motorcycle or scooter instead of their car, leaving more parking spaces for the rest.

    • carbureted

      Yup. It’s the same here in S. Korea as well. Parking on the sidewalk is wonderful.

    • marcomau

      Portugal, Spain, France, Italy the same. I believe it’s only a problem in the land of the free. ;)

  • runnermatt

    SUV, Stylisticly Unnecessary Vehicle. This could be a fun game, how many names can we make for SUV!

    • chris ordanez

      Stupefyingly Ubiquitous Vehicle

  • E Brown

    I’ve never worried about it, as my bike has as much right to a spot as a car, and Chicago makes pretty much no concessions to bikes/mopeds. That said, the riders are cool, and in crowded conditions I always return to find another bike or two sharing the spot rather than taking yet another.

    Driver logic can be strange though. At work in the Loop, there was one SUV-sized spot right next to the office entrance that was legal unpaid parking. A girl with a Sportster got to work early enough to always snag it, which meant those of us arriving later could squeeze in as well, so every day 5 or 6 bikes and mopeds were parked there. You wouldn’t believe all the complaining we heard over how unfair it was that six people were using the space instead of one car – like it was a bad thing!

    • Jeremy Alvarado

      ha same thing at my job, i get to work about 2 hours before anyone and always have the best space for my bike, i always leave room for other bikes and the amount hate i get is amazing

  • mrniceguy715

    I work at a mall, they have motorcycle only parking way on the other side and it was already full. One of my co-workers did a terrible job parking her truck and was taking up 2 spaces. So instead of taking whole spot I fill in right there. That seems pretty fair right? Evidently not, even though nothing larger than a Honda Fit would be able to park there someone knocked my tail light off my cruiser. I know it was knocked off and not it by some car not paying attention from the damage, the way the metal bracket was stripped and the fist sized micro cracks in the lens….

  • Deeds

    The way I see it is if my motorcycle is a registered vehicle for the roads like every other car, then I have every right to park in a ‘car’ spot.

  • McMike

    Let’s not forget to park in the front of the space. Better the car sees you and gets pissed BEFORE he hits the bike and gets pissed.

  • Marc Contevita

    I work for a casino and we have strange parking rules. Normally, employees park in the employee parking lot across the street and take a shuttle to the main building but if you’re “back of house” or supervisor or above you can park in the garage attached to the casino. I’m in IT so we’re considered “back of house” operations and I get to park at the closer and more accessible parking. Prior to this year, we motorcyclist can park where the guest can park motorcycles, at the west entrance against a wall. It’s a nice parking area for bikers, near the entrance, elevators and there’s a guard nearby. So, this year HR decides to change it up, none of them are riders, and sent a memo out stating that we riders need to park like everyone else in a designated area. The fellow coworkers that ride thought it was a good idea to take up one whole spot for each bike even though we can probably park 3 or 4 bikes in one car spot. I’ve noticed we all park the same method too, back the bike in, park at an angle and at the front of the spot. This makes for easy egress, only one bike can get it there and the cagers can see that the spot is occupied. I’ve seen mishaps where a cager will blindly pull into a spot only to hit a bike that is parked in the back of the spot and get knocked down. We get a couple of complaints about taking up a whole spot but if we’re going to be treated like a car then we’re going to take up the entire spot.

  • Guest

    I work for a casino and we have strange parking rules. Normally,
    employees park in the employee parking lot across the street and take a
    shuttle to the main building but if you’re “back of house” or supervisor
    or above you can park in the garage attached to the casino. I’m in IT
    so we’re considered “back of house” operations and I get to park at the
    closer and more accessible parking. Prior to this year, we motorcyclist
    can park where the guest can park motorcycles, at the west entrance
    against a wall. It’s a nice parking area for bikers, near the entrance,
    elevators and there’s a guard nearby. So, this year HR decides to
    change it up, none of them are riders, and sent a memo out stating that
    we riders need to park like everyone else in a designated area. The
    fellow coworkers that ride thought it was a good idea to take up one
    whole spot for each bike even though we can probably park 3 or 4 bikes
    in one car spot. I’ve noticed we all park the same method too, back the
    bike in, park at an angle and at the front of the spot. This makes for
    easy egress, only one bike can get it there and the cagers can see that
    the spot is occupied. I’ve seen mishaps where a cager will blindly
    pull into a spot only to hit a bike that is parked in the back of the
    spot and get knocked down. We get a couple of complaints about taking
    up a whole spot but if we’re going to be treated like a car then we’re
    going to take up the entire spot.

  • SniperSmitty

    I always park near the entrance to a space so some crazy cager doesn’t assume it’s an empty spot and plow my bike over when they pull in without really looking. I always pull in now since I just learned how to kick stand turn my bike. Very useful since bikes don’t have a reverse gear.
    Keep the dirty side down riders.

    • Piglet2010

      Newer Gold Wings have a reverse gear.

      • SniperSmitty

        Huh. Good to know. I’d imagine you would need reverse to move a beast like that. Gotta weigh 1,000 pounds. My CBR weighs 374 dry. Gold Wings are nice if you’re into the couch on wheels type of bikes. Thanks and Keep the dirty side down man.

        • Piglet2010

          The reverse on the Gold Wing uses the starter motor, not an actual reverse gear in the transmission.

  • John

    Come now. Motorcylists want, no, DEMAND the advantage of lane splitting and jumping in front of others at the earliest convenience (and I almost hit one of these idiots today with my 5000lb truck) so the least we can do is not take up a whole parking spot just because we think we can. When you find an alternative place to park and let the space for the cars, car drivers notice and don’t think we’re a bunch of selfish twits.

    • TechGuy5489

      First, lane splitting works out better for everyone given enough motorcycles. Sitting still in traffic when there’s space to keep things flowing in is inefficient. For all of the so called demanding you’re talking about only one state in the US kinda/sorta acknowledges it. Second, I’d happily park my bike in “an alternative place” provided that it wasn’t illegal virtually everywhere. I’m not subjecting myself to parking tickets so I use motorcycle parking when available or I use a full parking space. If I’m riding with friends we will, within reason, share a full space.

      Not really sure what you mean by “jumping in front of others at the earliest convenience” though…

      • John

        I was cut off by several motorcyclists today at different times, jamming themselves in front of me, which causes me a delay as well, because once they’ve wedge in, I can’t run over them and need to give them their space. I could have probably run over a guy today legally, he was so reckless in cutting me off to get in front of me. These are the kind of aholes that get us bad press. So I try to counter that any way possible.

    • Campisi

      “Look at that asshole parking his bike in [the empty space of the parking lot/structure not demarcated as parking], motorcycle riders think they’re above the law.”

      Sometimes we’re screwed no matter what we do.

      • John

        I don’t see that. I think if there are plenty of spots, no one cares either way. But when space is tight, I think most people will obviously appreciate that motorcyclists are helping by tucking their bike in a space unusable by a car. No one has ever eyeballed me or said anything for doing that and there’s almost always that spot, usually with yellow lines or just too small for a car. No tickets, nothing. I think it is an obviously good thing to do.

  • sharper86

    I park on the street in front of my house in DC and have had my bike knocked over times than I care to remember. It seems some people can’t take an extra 2 minutes to cautiously parallel park their car (and/or check their mirrors) and my motorcycle ends up the victim. So when it comes to parking my motorcycle, I find a defensive position between other cars – even if it means taking up more space.

    Not sure if other readers feel the same way, but DC is an awful place for motorcycle parking. Sure, there are some designated areas that offer cheap all-day parking, but they are few and far between. What’s worse is that scooters 50cc and under can park on the sidewalk for free, while I’m forced to move my bike every two hours to avoid a hefty ticket.

  • scottdc

    Here in Portland a few stores in my neighborhood have recently added motorcycle-only parking spots but I regularly see cars parked in them so I do not feel bad taking up a car spot at all…

  • Piglet2010

    I have found that H-D owners do not like it if you share the space they have parked in – they must be afraid of their bike catching Metric Cooties™.

    I also was threatened with having my bike towed by the *%*^ apartment manager where a relative lived, because I was parking in the *same* rented spot as her sub-compact car – would have been fine is she had been parking a full-size van or dually pick-up with a larger overall footprint that both her car and my bike.

  • Mr.Paynter

    Here in South Africa a bunch of socio-economicc junk like high unemployment levels and low levels of education mean we have “car-guards” basically poor, often poorly educated guys who stand around to deter car thieves for tips and I have been harassed SO MANY times trying to park a bike in a car spot because they are not educated/rational enough to even understand my argument on the subject.

    I aim for bike parkings which are actually quite common here, or pavements and have only once ever got a ticket for it in 12 years or so.

  • Nick Paul

    if people get mad about me parking in a spot, i just say well i could have driven my car here and this spot would still have been taken so just move along

  • Mechanacor

    About two weeks ago I parked at caesars palace and went about my day on the strip. When I returned to my spot on the fifth floor way in the back away from the more desirable .spots my bike was missing. It had been pushed behind a pillar between two spots. There was a note on the bars. It said “sorry g had to move your bike to park! Hope that’s cool!” Clearly I was pissed. I try to park In the bike spots whenever I get the chance too as tourists just don’t care about anything that’s not theirs I’m entitled to a lane when I’m riding,im entitled to a space when I’m parking.

  • Adam Spano

    Fuck em. One person, one spot. I’ve never even thought twice about this. I, as a person, am taking up an allotted space in the parking lot just the same as the dude who drove his dually F350. At the same time, the parking spots next to the one I am currently occupying are much easier for others to use, since I’m using up such a small portion of the space I am in, leaving them with plenty of room to move their gigantic land-barges into their respective docking ports.

  • gravit8ed

    I used to park my ’01 super sherpa in some crazy places because, frankly, it wasn’t much bigger than some mountain bikes, and I often chained it to something so two thugs couldn’t just pick it up and walk away with it.
    This resulted in plenty of ‘fake tickets’ from mall security, or the overzealous grounds staff at movie theaters or larger business complexes, etc. I never could understand why these jerks want to bother with it when three other asshats have intentionally taken up like 12 spaces with their shiny sports cars or extended-cab lifted 40-inch mud-tired F350 dually.
    I also live in a downtown complex with – literally – no available on-street parking for several blocks in any direction, but the skywalk-connected ramp does have motorcycle spots. When I set up monthly parking for my van (@ $65/month, no less) I asked about ‘secured’ motorcycle parking and multiple people said I could use the designated moto spaces for no fee, there was no system to even charge me for the moto. At any rate, I was out of town for a few days and recieved 3 $25 tickets for not moving the bike by the time I got back…let me tell you, that was an unpleasant conversation for the parking systems’ operations manager. The result was that they opened up more moto spaces actually inside the parking ramp and away from the street, and they don’t dare ticket my bike anymore. Even when my ’83 KZ1100 started pissing full synthetic all over the place, they called me before trying to ticket. Obvs, parking systems in this country were not designed for two wheels.