Best Value One-Piece Motorcycle Race Suits

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Best Value One-Piece Motorcycle Race Suits

Finally saved up enough cash to buy a nice, leather one-piece? These are the suits that will give you the most bang for your buck, keep you safe, comfortable, looking good and facilitating the sport of motorcycle riding. This is the best value one-piece motorcycle race suits.

What To Look For In A One-Piece Suit

Fit will be your biggest compromise. No suit fits perfectly. They’re made to meet the needs of the average size male in the U.S. For whatever reason, the manufacturers think we all have a 36 in. and upwards waistline with skinny arms and legs. Thin guys with broad shoulders are left to deal with the baggy-diaper-butt look or dish out extra cash for a custom suit. Make sure when getting fit for your suit you figure in the extra room necessary for the back and chest protector you intend to wear. It is advisable to take them along to try on with the suit if possible.

This purchase is going to live with you for a very long time. So make sure you’ve saved up enough money to buy what you really want. You don’t want to be limited to the entry-level suits, which cost under $900. Not that they’re bad, but the budget items just aren’t as…performance driven as their more expensive counterparts. Cheaper suits are constructed with heavier, lower-quality hides and most aren’t as well ventilated either. A few C-notes extra will get you into one of these mid-tier suits, which are more than enough to meet all of your needs concerning protection, style and fit.

Why a one-piece? Well, like a set of football pads, hockey skates or a catcher’s mask, they’re a high-tech item of sporting gear that you need if you’re going to play this sport for real. Not only are they the safest thing you can possibly put on your body, but they allow the greatest freedom of movement and on-bike comfort too. They are particularly good in hot weather or while riding hard, where their perforations and ventilation channels flow cooling air around your entire body.

Dainese Laguna Seca Evo P. Estiva
Dainese Laguna Seca Evo P. Estiva

Dainese Laguna Seca Evo P. Estiva (Perforated) — $1,199.95

The Laguna Seca is my favorite suit at any price level. Its minimal display of color and logos coupled with it’s clean silhouette make it the first go-to choice on my suit rack. Break-in period is nonexistent, the suit exhibits excellent ergonomics on and off the bike due to microelastic inserts perfectly placed on the legs, back and elbows.

Dainese Aero Evo P
Dainese Aero Evo P

Dainese Aero Evo P — $1,549.95

The Aero Evo is an exceptional suit, fitting perfectly when tucked in thanks to its patented, elasticated abdominal section. It also carries the aluminum inserts over the shoulder/knee/elbow like the top-of-the-line, $2,000 Team Suit. The back hump also accommodates an optional hydropack.

Alpinestars Atem Suit
Alpinestars Atem Suit

Alpinestars Atem Suit — $1,499.95

I reviewed this suit on video last year. It comes with the same bells and whistles as Alpinestars top of line Race Replica suit ($2,900), minus the compatibility with the TechAir airbag system.

SPIDI Track Wind Pro
SPIDI Track Wind Pro

SPIDI Track Wind Pro — $1,299.95

SPIDI suits aren’t commonly seen in the states. But, they do have a strong presence in the world scene of motorcycle racing. Some of their most recognizable sponsored riders are Marco Melandri, Andrea Dovisioso and Cal Crutchlow. Having owned one for a short period, I can attest firsthand that the Italian leather hides used on their suit and gloves are probably the most supple I’ve ever felt. The race hump also accommodates an optional hydropack.

I prefer to use what is tried and tested by the best athletes in our sport. How about you? What brand of suit do you wear? And why?

  • Moot

    Any comments on Spidi in light of Cal Crutchlow having gravel coming inside the suit during crash due to burst or damaged seams? (Cannot remember the exact series, but it was during 2013 motogp season. In practice, if i remember correctly, where Marquez also crashed and got penalised due to being reckless during yellow flag)

    • Guest
      • Geert Willem van der Horst

        “For the Tech 3 team, the British Grand Prix was a disaster. It had all started to go wrong on Saturday, when Cal Crutchlow had a couple of huge crashes. Crutchlow suffered serious abrasions to his right lower arm, with his leathers tearing open and gravel and dirt getting in to rip up his skin. It is the fifth time this year that his leathers have let him down, though of course, if he didn’t crash, his leathers would not be subject to such abuse. That is no excuse, however: motorcycle racing leathers should not burst at the seams, and riders should not be picking gravel out of their arms with a wire brush.”

        • Ayabe

          Wow, his leathers failed 5 times in one season? I’d be on the horn to…someone.

          • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

            Maybe Cal should endeavor to fall off a little less…

            • Ayabe

              That’s always an option :P

            • wbizzle

              Yeah definitely, but that is kind of the point of the suit.

        • Dubknot

          Thanks for that info. I’ve been looking at Spidi or RevIt, and even though I know I won’t be hitting the speeds those guys do, I don’t want to find their minimum threshold for them either.

    • Geert Willem van der Horst

      I recall that he had problems with bursting seams a couple of times as well. Coincidence that Cal will be riding in Alpinestars next season?

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Spidi has been around for decades and has a solid reputation for quality. I spoke with a Japanese journalist on the 899 launch who was wearing one and said he felt it was better quality than his previous Kushitani suit.

    • Mitchel Durnell

      SportBikeTrackGear had a cool breakdown of a set of MotoGP leathers, I forget which brand, but one of the things that stuck out was weight savings via reduction of material; these pro level suits don’t need to withstand multiple crashes because they are replaced by the team/sponsors so quickly, versus a consumer level suit which will have more durability via heavier and more crude materials; it’s possible Cal was forced to re-cycle suits, depending on the gear allowance Tech 3 has.

  • Loren Andrews

    I currently just bought the Alpinestars GP plus pants and they fit really tight. It almost hurts my waist when im tucked but If I had gone a size up all the armor moved around and it felt really unsafe with all the excess leather, so I went with the lesser of two evils. Im looking at buying a one piece this summer and ideas for fit? Ive never tried Dainese.

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Right. So, those pants don’t fit you. Why’d you buy them?

      Try a bunch of stuff on, on your bike, and figure out what works.

  • Justin McClintock

    This article highlights something I’ve noticed about this website before. I’m beginning to feel you guys have no sense of the term “value” at all. It always seems that your answer to everything is simply to throw money at it. “That best (insert product here) is clearly (insert most expensive option here). Yes, it cost 1,273 times the next closest competitor, but it has the AWESOME marketing department!”

    Not saying these suits aren’t good, but I’m certain there’s something less expensive than these that DOES meet the needs of the vast majority of riders out there. Just don’t show me anything from Bilt.

    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      No, there isnt. Buy second hand.

      • Justin McClintock

        So I can get sponsored and make it to the MotoGP level…and still have my Spidi suit come apart at the seems. Repeatedly. Sounds like fun! Just goes to show that throwing money at the problem doesn’t always solve it.

        • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

          Yes. Because if a factory race bike breaks down, it means all of their consumer products are unreliable. Do you read what you write before posting? Go buy a suit that retails for less than $1000. Tell us how it goes.

          • Justin McClintock

            No, it doesn’t mean all of their consumer products are unreliable. That being said, it should be the best they have to offer, and it IS being used in the same manner as their consumer products. So it should be a marketing opportunity for them to demonstrate how good their stuff is. When their best suit falls when being used in the same manner that their lesser suits are intended to be used, how am I supposed to view that? Think about that for a minute and use a little logic before you throw random insults.

            And for the record, Alpinestars has 3 suits that all MSRP under $1000. So are they crap too?

            • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

              Yep that’s exactly right. A* below a certain price point isn’t that good. The quality of the leather, the stitching, the cut, etc. Nothing from anyone is.

          • Dave Mason

            Head on over to trackdaymag.com to read a ton of reviews of suits of all prices being ridden – and more importantly – crashed in.

            • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

              Nice plug. No i just talk to guys at the track.

              • Dave Mason

                Not my site. Just a useful site managed by a guy with a ton of racing and coaching experience who shares what he learns with others and he doesn’t make a dime doing it.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Lots of racers with crash analysis and gear reviews here too bayarearidersforum.com/

                • Justin McClintock

                  BARF? Oh crap. Nevermind.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Love it or hate it, it’s where everyone that matters is.

                • Justin McClintock

                  Everyone that matters? Everyone that matters isn’t necessarily in San Fran and Oakland.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  No but most of your superbike schools, US distributors, and american world-class tracks are.

                • Justin McClintock

                  Barber is in Birmingham. :-P

                • Piglet2010

                  Road America is in BFE Wisconsin.

                • Brian Collins

                  COTA is in TX

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Which was built a couple years ago. California’s been doing this for a very long time. The industry leaders are still here.

                • Brian Collins

                  yeah, we here in NY aint gots none o’ that money stuff….
                  and hosting a GP race kinda sorta “matters” (texas, indiana???)
                  racing schools can be found NJ of all places!! atlanta too!
                  I order my Tucker Rocky parts from Pennsylvania! I know! PA!! who would’ve thought people can ride on two wheels in THAT state.

                  there is more to this big ol’ world of ours besides your precious bay area.
                  I think I read somewhere that Japan is now making motorcycles too.

                  oh, and I can counter your condescending arrogant comments with sarcastic a-hole comments all night. I’m bored.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Yeah, you’ve got it MADE in New York. How’s the weather? My friends were at thunderhill last weekend in shorts and a teeshirt getting ready for the new 600 race season. You really think your state attracts motorcyclists and motorcycling business like california? You’ve heard of Keith Code and california superbike school. You should know who dave moss and ken hill are. Name someone from new york I would know.

                • Brian Collins

                  uh, dude. get over yourself
                  bridgestone (Tennessee) do they “matter”?
                  Givi USA (North Carolina AND Nevada. Neither are the bay area) Do they “matter”?
                  Alpinestars (SOCAL) Do they “matter”?
                  Scorpion (SOCAL) Do they “matter”?
                  Red Bull AND Monster Energy (SOCAL) Do they “matter”?
                  None are in your Bay area.
                  DUde, I’m just saying that the motorcycling world doesn’t revolve around the bay area?

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Four of your five are either in california or set up near the border for a reason. The bay area may not be the center of the world, but then again I never said it was. I said it was a BIG community with everyone that matters part of that community.

                • Piglet2010

                  What other places have that the Bay Area does not – a lack of people such as Kr Tong.

                • Dave Mason

                  Which world class track are you referring to? Laguna Seca? Shouldn’t a world class track host a GP? Lest you forget, the only two tracks hosting GPs are in Texas and Indiana. You see, in your efforts to make the rest of us feel small and insignificant, you overstate your position, thereby diminishing it. From my experience it is the one who is not really all that important that must continuously suggest to others that they are. Judging by your post count you’ve got lots of convincing to do. And yes, Laguna Seca deserves a GP.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  What are you on about? Laguna deserves a gp? Oh gee maybe one of these days it will.

                • Dave Mason

                  You’re riding crossed up in your profile pic. Maybe you should go get schooled by someone that matters.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Actually im not, but i appreciate your concern.

                • Dave Mason

                  Actually you are. See the way your inside shoulder is turned away from the apex? Toward the outside of the turn? You’re hanging your butt off but not doing much of anything with your upper body. Crossed up. You need to lower your head and shoulders and open your inside shoulder to the turn. Keep working on it, you’ll get there.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Hahaha you have no idea what youre talking about. Lets find you some actually crossed up avatars for you to critique.

                • Dave Mason

                  Why do we need other avatars? Your’s is the one being discussed. Explain to me where my critique of your body position is flawed, in coherent terms, please.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Look at your avatar. Now raise your body up so to look over the hillcrest in front of you. Now change the camera angle. Then poke your eye out for being “that guy” critiquing body position without knowing where in the turn you are.

                • Dave Mason

                  Nice try. The proper use of reference points allows the rider to stay on line without raising up off the bike to “see” where they’re going. As an example, you can sit up and beg on the bike as much as you want but you’re never going to see over the crest of turn four at Barber, which is why the tower is used as a reference point. Don’t be “that guy” and make excuses for your lazy riding and poor technique.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Im not looking to see where im going. Im looking to see over the hill.

                • Dave Mason

                  See above comments.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Yeah. You’re still way off. The things you can’t possibly know yet you insist on thinking you do.

                • Dave Mason

                  Yet you have not refuted my discussion of technique. What am I way off about? The importance of reference points and why they allow the rider to maintain proper body position? So far your explanation includes “I’m not looking to see where I’m going”, which is a hard, steadfast rule which is NEVER to be broken while riding a motorcycle. Facts are facts, one always looks where they are going while on a motorcycle and reference points are used in every track situation in order to stay on line, even when that line is not visible. Again, nice try.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Uh, reference points dont make you not crossed up. This is really really dumb. And to think all of this because of what? You want me to say california and the midwest are equal? Really?

                • Dave Mason

                  Read slowly and maybe you’ll understand: your explanation of being crossed up is that you needed to sit up to see over a hill. The point I’ve made time and again is that reference points allow the rider to stay on line without changing body position to “see” what is over a hill, or around a turn, etc. Perhaps some more track instruction will help you “get” it. My suggestion is to get with a quality instructor as soon as possible before you hurt yourself. No skin off my nose, bud.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  check your facebook messages. This is stupid.

                • Dave Mason

                  Sucks being called out right in front of all the other kids, huh? Especially when you’ve been so successful at playing the role of Internet Bully…

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  No i was trying to do you a favor. Fine. Have it your way. Anything else?

                • Dave Mason

                  And? My head is down and looking through the turn. Also, look how much closer my elbow is to my knee. My upper body is significantly lower. Nice try.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Wow. You’re crouching. Really cool.

                • Dave Mason

                  With each cheap, sarchastic comment you diminish your credibility. You have demonstrated with your comments a lack of basic understanding of motorcycle track riding. Again, seek out a quality instructor and LISTEN for a change, before you finally get fast enough to really hurt yourself and possibly someone else out on the track.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Are you done yet?

                • Dave Mason

                  LOL, and he’s a phsychoanalyst, too! Cheers bud, I believe my position has been clearly stated.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Not really. Name one other reason anyone would do what you just did. Because you CARE about me? please.

                • Dave Mason

                  No, I don’t care about you. It will be unfortunate however when you take out another rider on track. Please choose to make your passes on the outside to lessen the chances of it happening. That’s probably all I can hope for you to remember. I’m sure you’ll have a snappy retort as you clearly are not capable of letting this die, despite what you’d have us think. You love the attention. And if you recall, this began when I suggested a site that I thought others could benefit from. You instantly launched into your insane Pro-California rambling. I decided to throw my hat into the ring to give a whiny Internet Bully his due (if you don’t know what I’m talking about check your 600+ post where you argue, and bully others with ALL CAPS to try and “communicate” as you regurgitate snippets about WD-40 that you read on the Internet). Peace! I’m out!

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Yes you being stupid and trying to prove my avatar has bad body position is retribution for how bullied you feel. But if you look, you were never bullied. Nor was anybody else. They, like you, asked for a response and I responded. You set the tone. Deal with it.

                • Piglet2010

                  Well, not always. For example, when coming up an on-ramp, one should at intervals look to see where traffic on the travel lanes is at, and not just the proper place to look if the same curve was part of a race track.

                  The other exception, which Jason Pridmore teaches, is to look farther to the inside of the turn that you want to go as a way to tighten your line or to just get around the turn if you start to panic.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Yep. Looking to the inside of the turn, or REALLY inside of the turn is a psychological way of preventing yourself from running wide. If you’re freaking out, tensing up, feeling yourself running wide, looking at an even more exaggerated place on the inside of the turn can help you not point fixate and crash. It’s not going to help you in any way, shape or form with your body position, however.

                • Dave Mason

                  You’ve clearly never ridden Grattan in Michigan. Nearly every turn is blind and nearly every section of track includes elevation change. Anyone riding there at speed as you are in your avatar, or making the “explanation” you just offered would be spit off the bike within a lap. Good BP is good BP, and bad is bad, regardless of what you “think” you know.

                • Piglet2010

                  Maybe he has a periscope on his bike? ;)

    • Jack McLovin

      The motorcycle of the year stuff could not be more predictable either, just pick the fastest or most expensive or the latest to come out bike in each category.

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Well, there’s “value” in terms of awful products from people like Bilt that won’t perform or last like the real stuff, then there’s “value” like the real stuff that will last forever, keep you safe in a crash and work as advertised. Yes, one-piece suits are expensive. They need to be.

      • Justin McClintock

        Wes, see Archie’s comment below. Just because something’s expensive doesn’t necessarily make it good (ask Cal about that one), and it certainly doesn’t automatically make it a good value.

        • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

          Right, which is why we’ve specifically picked these suits, all of which we have heaps of personal experience with. These are all personal recommendations after, in some cases, years of wear.

    • BlackSnake

      If you ever stopped for a minute to think why you can read all these articles on RideApart for free, this should not come as a big surprise to you. RideApart is for sure not a nonprofit organization. Although I don’t know their business model, it wouldn’t surprise me if they make money out of the gear pick articles presented on their website. I don’t mean to criticize this. To me It’s fair enough that they earn some money by advertising products on their website to present all the other nice articles for free. But you shouldn’t mistake their reviews as real reviews. They are rather a good form of advertisement.

      • Justin McClintock

        I’m trying to think (and hoping) that is not the case. I’d like to think they are truly unbiased. Hence my comments. If you’re right, I’d like to think we deserve to know. It would certainly change how I feel about the site if that is the case. But again, I’m hoping it’s not.

      • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

        Editorial content is not advertising. It never has been and never will be.

    • Ryan Sweeney

      Agreed, there are quite a few hand made brands that hold up great and are under $1,000.

      It really seems like they just go on the top brands and pick their cheapest suits they offer. Come on guys, do a little research!

      • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

        Or, you know, picked the suits that we ride in ourselves.

        • DirtyDeedsDoneDirtCheap

          yeah but that’s your problem,as others here have pointed out your ownership and use of the suits is driving your recommendations beyond the point of their just being based on your positive experience. You’re strongly implying, even coming right out and saying, negative experiences with the ownership and use of what you would not recommend, that aren’t backed up in real-life.

          Basically your comments read like this:

          X is expensive and good, it’s good because it’s expensive. I buy it and use it myself, I’ve had no real problems with it and I trust it with my life.

          Y is cheap and sucks, it sucks because it’s cheap, I would never buy, use or recommend it and I would never trust my life with it and I know that it sucks.

          You’re missing the point that this is just your opinion based on your word and some easily-verifiable prices, and supporting posts from others who have also bought and used the same gear. But that’s only half the battle, a half-won battle that you seem to think is the entire battle won. What about any posts from people who have bought and used the gear that you say that you would never use etc. and who can and will collaborate your opinion on it?

          The fact that you not only have not but never would actually buy and try that gear limits the scope and significance of your opinion.
          And then when you begin to talk like you’re An Authority (and not just the Forum Mod), you just double-down on the perception that you’re just an ignorant elitist. People point that out to you and all you can say in response is that you trust your own judgement based on your own experience then question why anyone would ever trust or use cheap gear. Again the point is sailing right over your head, like you’re afraid to even look up at it. Fine some expensive gear (I assume that you haven’t tried and wrecked in all the expensive gear out there) is actually very good and fits well, holds-up well.

          That doesn’t mean that all the cheap gear out there sucks.
          Which is your position.

          And when your nose is too far up in the air to even try it, you don’t bring much to the table.

          It doesn’t take a lot of brainpower to think that an expensive big-name suit is probably pretty good.

        • Chris McAlevy

          I’ve heard lots of positive reviews from my peers of companies that custom manufacture race suits, theoretically at the level of quality of a $1-2k suit but for <$1k. I've never seen any professional reviews on them, however. Do you guys have any input on those?

          edit: the only example I can think of off the top of my head is lionheart.

          • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

            See my comments on those two brands below.

          • roma258

            I have experience with a similar type company (Ayden Lee Racing). Pretty sure they get all their suits made in the same place in Pakistan. They are not bad suits, really. I’ve had mine since 2011, done about 10 track days on it and a bunch of mini bike track days (lower speeds, more crashing). Had a couple crashes at the big track, a ton at the kart tracks and the suit is still in use and I’ve walked away each time. This year, some of the seams started to bust and I had to take it to a leather repair guy. It’s looking pretty ragged at this point, but I plan on keeping it for mini and just bought a Rev’it suit for the big track (on clearance).

            My position is that if you are a serious track day guy, spend the money and get the higher-end suit. It’ll last longer, withstand more crashes and keep you safer. If you’re just dabbling or want a suit to wear on the street, there’s nothing wrong with buying the cheaper stuff, just do your research. My buddy who got one of the cheaper Astars suits has gotten some pretty bad suit rash from crashes, while I’ve never had any issues. Just cause it’s name brand, doesn’t mean it’s necessarily quality. Also, around these parts, bunch of racers wear Heroic suits and everyone seems to love ‘em, fwiw.

      • adeysworld

        I speak on what I have experience with. You say there are a few “hand made brands” making suits, but you don’t name any.
        Add some value to your comments guy.

    • adeysworld

      I’ve owned a suit from all three tiers, top to bottom rank. There is a huge difference in comfort, fit and performance between top tier and entry level suits.
      What I listed above is what I have experience with. At the end of the article I asked people to share what suits they own and why. What suit do you own?

      • Justin McClintock

        I don’t have one. I’ve been thinking about getting one. Fortunately, I have a pretty unlimited budget, but that doesn’t mean I want to spend money I don’t necessarily have to. If you’ve owned suits at the bottom of the ranks as well, including specific information about those as well would certainly help, rather than just glossing over them. It would be much appreciated.

  • jasinner

    The target audience for this site must have way more disposable income than me if these are supposed values. I have a Cortech suit that seems well made and fits my American (fat) frame which is a problem with these brands. Maybe the millionaires who buy these suits have money to hire personal trainers and not to eat at McDonalds.

    • Piglet2010

      Yes, the Cortech suits are better for those who suffer from “Dunlop Disease” (which appears to be an actual disease due to intestinal bacteria, and not just poor habits), than the Alpinestars and some others which are made for skinny people with short upper bodies and long legs.

  • Dave

    So why are these a better value than something like this?
    http://www.motorcyclegear.com/street/suits/leather_racing_suits/joe_rocket/speedmaster_60_one_piece_leather_motorcycle_race_suit.html
    For ~$650, you get all the same features (at least on paper) as the above for less than half the price. Why wouldn’t those be “best value”? If Joe Rocket’s not your thing, AGV and Cortech have similar priced suits, and I’m sure there are others.

    FWIW, I have an older pair of JR SpeedMaster 5.0 pants, and while they’re not as clean and well cut as my Alpinestars, they seem just as protective.

    • Archie

      People like to buy stuff they see all the WSBK, MotoGP and TT riders using. Not so much for fashion and “check me out I’m Lorenzo!” but because they’ve seen it in action and they know it works (unless your name is Cal). There IS actually a fair difference in the finer details between the cheap ones you’ve mentioned and the top level stuff in the article. The big ones are reinforced impact layers, stitching and hide qualities. Cheap hide is heavy and less resistant to abrasion. Single stitched seams are basically useless and will burst immediately. Single hide layers can only protect you so much under stress, where double or triple impact layers can greatly help mitigate injury.

      That said, leather is leather, and as long as you’re not hurtling along at 300kph it’ll do the job. Whether or not it’ll do it more than once depends on how much you pay.

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Ewww. Dude. A one-piece is a high-end piece of technical apparel. Variables in their construction are leather strength/weight/thickness/quality, seam strength/quality, safety, fit, comfort and longevity. A Dainese suit will fit you perfectly and keep you comfortable on the bike across many seasons and many crashes. A Joe Rocket suit will fall apart after a short period of use, will fit poorly and protect you in an inferior manner.

      • Justin McClintock

        The fit is up to the end user finding something that fits, no the manufacturer of off-the-shelf stuff. You can’t make a blanket statement like “X will fit you great and Y won’t.” I doubt anything Dianese (or anybody else) makes that’s an off-the-shelf item will fit my weird-ass frame even remotely decently.

        • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

          Yes you can. It seems as if you’ve taken personal offense because this article discusses a very expensive item of riding gear. I’m sorry if that’s the case, but one-pieces are expensive for a reason.

          I can’t speak to Archie’s guy in Australia, but at that price, I’d imagine he’s using lower quality hides and no-name armor. That’s not something I would wear or would recommend to anyone else. One-pieces are expensive for a reason, they use the best materials and use a lot of them. They’re the most advanced piece of technical apparel a motorcyclist puts on and, after his helmet, the most expensive.

          Fit is a function of size, yes, but also consistency in those sizes. A suit from a budget manufacturer may have legs in slightly different shapes and bends. No two suits from that manufacturer may be identical. The patterns they use won’t be the product of years of research into on-bike comfort and freedom of movement. Their ventilation will be holes poked in leather, not tailored airflow created using computer simulations and tested in wind tunnels. The leather treatment process will result in more brittle, less strong leather. The armor will cover a lesser area of your body. Etc etc etc etc. Expensive one-pieces are expensive for a reason and there are no cases in which they are not a better choice.

          • kungufgrip

            Then you should call this article “Most expensive one pieces are expensive for a reason” per your last sentence. The title of this article is whats unbelievably misleading. These aren’t best value suits… sorry. The problem with your heading is that it gives riders the impression that in order to be safe they have to go out and buy a $1600 Dainese suit. That just couldn’t be further from the truth and shouldn’t be encouraged.We as riders want other riders to be safe, and wear protective gear. While the Aero EVO is certainly a nice suit… protection can be had for a fraction of its price tag. That’s fact.

          • Ken Lindsay

            Dude, you guys took a beating on this article! I personally think it was a bit much.
            I do see how the word “value” is the culprit. I guess the article title should have been worded differently, but I’m not a journalist so I won’t pretend to know what should have been used. Still, it was a useful article.
            Honestly, I feel a secondary article should be looked into to appease your readers. This time, put a best suit from $X to $Y. I look forward to the next one!

      • Piglet2010

        A Dainese suit will not fit me perfectly, but a Cortech will. But I guess certain brands only want people built like MotoGP riders wearing their gear.

    • Sam

      That’s the one I have ( and actually that’s my review of the blue one at the bottom of the page). I lowsided at around 70mph at Road America and the suit survived with only superficial marks and one of the Joe Rocket logo patches ripped off. No seams were damaged.

  • Archie

    All my suits have been custom made by a local company here in Australia. Kangaroo hide, double/triple impact layers, double/triple stitching all over, full armor and all the expected features and perforations. AU$800 (US$700) to my door. No hand-me-downs, no run-outs, no sponsorship. Went for a 100m slide down the track in my last one and not a seam came loose.

    My point: If you’re dead serious about buying a proper race suit and don’t want to spend a kings ransom getting these big brands to fit you into something off the shelf, get one tailor made by a local shop. If you’re worried about quality, just look for marques used by local racers. Talk to them and ask them how they rate the stuff they’re wearing. Search online for crash results. They’re everywhere.

    For those reading in Australia, Collins Leathers. http://www.collinsleathers.com/page2.html

    • Dave

      WTF? Even with $300 in shipping to the US, that’s insanely cheap. The good custom guys I’ve found in the states start their prices around $2500. Email will be sent.

      • TP

        I’ve heard of a few people on r/motorcycles that bought tailored suits made stateside that were less than $1k, Lionheart is the only one that comes to mind right now though.

        Keep in mind that when you buy Dainese/AStars/et al you’re also contributing in part to the hefty salaries of their small armies of GP/SBK riders. Okay they have the best R & D, but they spend boatloads on marketing too.

    • Vincent T.

      100 meter slide??

      • Archie

        Something like that. The bike at least went that far, I surely stopped earlier. Exaggeration for effect!

    • Justin McClintock

      This. See, this is what I was talking about with my previous comment. THAT is a good value. Those other suits are probably great, but aren’t necessarily a great value.

  • Nemosufu Namecheck

    There is a big difference between “inexpensive or cheap” and “best value”. These suits are definitely best value. I know a few track rats and they wear Dainese and Alpinestars because they can put them on every weekend and not worry about whether or not the suit will keep skin on muscle – after all that’s what a track suit is all about.

    • Dave

      I’m seeing it kinda like helmets. The $179 Bell Vortex with the Snell 2010 cert will keep you nearly as safe as any $700 Arai with the Snell 2010. You’re paying more for aerodynamics, comfort, venting, and weight. For *most* riders, the Bell is a better value, though not necessarily a better helmet.

      So aside from brand recognition, what makes these a better value than a cheaper option from something like Cortech? On paper, they have nearly the same specs.

      • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

        Cortech suits are made in Pakistan and just not up there in terms of quality, fit or comfort with the big names. They won’t last nearly as long, either.

        • Ryan Sweeney

          Have you used them before though?

          My MVD supermoto gear is made in pakistan also, has held up perfectly after more falls and slides than I can count.

          • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

            I would not trust a Cortech suit to protect me on a bike. No, I have not and will not use them.

            • Ryan Sweeney

              But thats like saying I wont wear walmart pants because theyre not gucci.

              If you have no experience of it, its pretty hard to give a review. If your scared or unwilling to try the off brands, where the actual value is, then how is this a good value review.

              Trust me I get it, I dont wanna wear walmart pants either, but Im not the one reviewing this stuff. If theres a large portion of people that have nothing but great things to say about cortech, but you dont trust them because they are cheap then thats kind of a problem dont you think?

              • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

                Don’t get me wrong. I’ve seen and handled the cheap stuff. That’s why I won’t wear it. I’ve also seen and handled the expensive stuff, which is why I trust it with my life. Cheap crap is cheap crap and has no place on my body when I’m riding fast and taking risks.

              • Me

                Stupid analogy. Gucci vs. Walmart jeans is a fashion/budget comparison.

                Racing/track suits feature PROTECTION, comfort, fit, cooling, longevity…

              • Clint Keener

                Go buy a Bilt suit, crash, and come share the results.

              • jasinner

                I wear Cortech leathers. They are not in the same category as Bilt or my old crappy Teknics. They are feature rich and seem much more well made. I have not crash tested them. I know some racing teams use their stuff though. I also don’t care where they were made. Two of my bikes were made in Thailand. They work fine.

            • Stuki

              Only recommending suits you have ridden in yourself, while reasonable enough in isolation, does create a bit of catch 22 when you simultaneously refuse to try any cheaper brand.

            • Piglet2010

              I would because I have crashed in a Cortech Latigo and it worked fine. They also fit many off us much better than off the rack Italian designed brands. Of course there are better suits, but the Cortech is a current production Hyundai and not a 1980′s Yugo.

        • Mitchel Durnell

          Cortech is my favorite of the ‘value’ brands, as they seem least interested in pretending they’re something they’re not; of course this doesn’t excuse a poor product. They seem to have a ‘top shelf’ suit and gloves that, on inspection, seem to feel like the lower rung quality of the big guys, at least.

  • Reid

    <— I'm so glad that my riding suit needs are taken care of when I transform. Of course, there was that whole excruciating augmentation surgery to endure first, but in the end it was worth it.

  • ChrisB

    https://shop.helimot.com/shopping/default.asp – Helimot leathers. They custom measure you, make a suit to your exact fit, and then instead of hard plates to deflect crash energy, they use high density foam padding. I would rather land on foam than a titanium plate. Those who had tried these suits swear by them. Think Aerostitch Roadcrafter but for leathers.

  • Kristian Leonardo Apuzzo

    I have the 2 piece version of the spidi suit mentioned in the article, but i only paid €600, and they threw in a back protector to go with it. That was in Rome, Italy though. Anyways, i crashed and slid into a pile of sharp rocks, but there is hardly a scratch on the suit. It still looks brand new. Best €600 i ever spent =)

  • skeelo221

    I can attest to the great fitment and feel of Spartan leathers. Great quality and price. I own their Charge suit and like it (but I have not yet crash tested it). WebBikeWorld did a review of it in 2011: http://www.webbikeworld.com/r4/spartan-leathers/charge-race-suit.htm
    http://www.spartanleathers.com

    Also Lion Heart sounds interesting and might give them a go next time around:
    http://lionheartmoto.com

    And others that are out there that are much more value and quality for the money.

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Both those companies take advantage of cheap leather manufacturing in Pakistan. Spartan hits a killer price point and definitely has value for those on a real budget, but even the guy behind it wouldn’t argue that his suits are better than Dainese.

      Lion, I can’t speak to as I’m unfamiliar with it, but hiding the source of your production (can’t find it anywhere on their site) is never a good sign. Again, I trust the stuff that’s worked in my experience and for people that I know. Will it be better than nothing? Sure. Is there value there? Probably. Is it going to hold up and work as well as the suits we’ve recommended? Not a chance in hell.

      • Louis

        And Dianese is almost all made in Africa. I won’t slam you for this article it is well written, however the title is completely wrong. It should be called, “of the suits we are actually willing to use, this is what we recommend”.

        I have gone back and read many of your reviews of items and you may not be paid by sponsors but you do slant your opinions a certain way.

        Everyone that writes for RideApart is listed as an Editor of some type. No one on your site is listed as a journalist, just editors. So any review or comparison you write is actually an editorial and not an unbiased, journalistic comparison.

        There fore anything I read from now on will be taken with a grain of salt.

  • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

    But a Corvette costs over $50,000. Are you arguing that we should recommend a Kia as a value performance car option?

    One piece suits start at around $800 and run up to $5,000+ for the good, custom stuff. $1,200 and $1,500 suits that deliver the function and quality of a $3k suit for half the price or less are good value. Again, I think you’re simply failing to appreciate that this an expensive category.

    • Justin McClintock

      No. A Kia won’t do what a Corvette will do. It won’t do half of what a Corvette will do. But I can go buy a Alpinestar 1 piece suit off the shelf right now for $800. Yes, it might not be as great as their $1500 model. But I’d be willing to bet it’d work for most people just fine. And that’s exactly where the value is. I can go on any forum out there and expect to hear great things about a $1500 Alpinestar suit. I don’t need Rideapart or any other magazine for that. I need Rideapart to be doing the legwork to find those diamonds in the rough, find the good stuff that doesn’t cost as much. Otherwise I could just Google “best 1 piece leathers” and scroll until a find a few forums.

      • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

        And riding in a bunch of suits and telling you which ones hit the right price/performance ratio doesn’t do that?

        As you can see above, Adey recommend the Dainese Laguna Seca as THE best suit you can buy. It’s also the cheapest on this list. And yes, you get an awful lot extra in terms of fit, ventilation, armor quality/coverage and other features for that extra $400.

        • Justin McClintock

          Yes, riding in a bunch of suits and telling us which ones hit the mark (AND which ones don’t and why) would do that. But unless I missed something (and I just reread the article, so I’m pretty sure I didn’t) that was never stated in this article. There was some good info on what differentiates these suits from one another. But what about any of the 3 Alpinestars suits available at $800? According to this article, they’ve been lumped in with Cortech and Bilt. We can pretty safely assume that’s not a fair assessment. Unless it’s correct, and you know that, but aren’t sharing. See where I’m going with this? If you guys really do know that much more about suits, be a little more in depth with the article. Review some of the inferior ones too and point out their issues specifically. Not, “If you don’t spend at least $X amount, you’re going to have a problem.” If this is an online magazine and not a blog, it should treat its content like that of a magazine as well. More details.

          • Mitchel Durnell

            I’ve tried on/inspected the Alpinestars Motegi suit and found it lacking. I believe there is a new division in suits, with the cheapest rung being produced in Vietnam. The Dainese Stripes suit felt similarly underwhelming as well.

            • Piglet2010

              Mr. Subjective says the highest quality sewing you will find in Asia is in Vietnam.

              • Mitchel Durnell

                I don’t doubt that, rather, the manufacturers spend more money in China on their machinery/QA and less in Vietnam, so while Vietnam could produce a high quality suit, in this instance they are being employed to create a lower tier suit (hence the price point.)

          • Brett

            I wouldn’t write off the Cortech suit. I’ve had the Latigo (cheap one) for two seasons and its great for the five track days a year I do. I bought it based on SportBikeTrackGear.com’s review in which they used AMA racer Tommy Aquino’s Cortech Latigo as an example. He had crashed heavily and become tangled with the bike but the suit prevented any injuries. It doesn’t have the brand charisma but if it keeps my skin on me and is comfortable for about $700 CDN, I’d say thats value.

          • HankBWYT

            This. The same happened in the “riding jeans” review. Some brands were dubbed “safe”, and others “unsafe”, without any facts or research to back those statements up. Wes and the other guys need to realise, that a product comparison is not just the personal opinion of three guys of their own suits. Either do a proper product comparison, or stick to what you are good at: motor reviews, riding techniques and good funny columns. I love this site and almost all the content, but the product reviews have been horrible lately.

      • Piglet2010

        My $550 Cortech Latigo suit actually fit off the shelf, and worked well enough the last time I crashed at the track – how much better can one get than no pain, abrasions, or bruising during a crash?

  • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

    Yeah, I get you, it’s hard. You kinda just have to build up that experience. We try to help as much as we can, but we can’t be there while you’re trying stuff on and swiping your credit card.

    You can totally get a seamstress or tailor to alter leather motorcycle wear and doing so is actually an excellent, affordable way to get stuff to fit you right. Just make sure your mom or anyone else has experience with motorcycle apparel and its unique doubled-up, hidden stitches. They do them that way so they don’t burst while sliding or get abraded through. So long as she can do the same (and I’m sure she can), then you’re golden.

    • Loren Andrews

      Hey thanks again Wes. You guys have put so much work in the rideapart website. You have helped me for everything from picking my first bike to getting all the right gear. I know I don’t say it enough but you have the absolute best motorcycle website out there. I hope you get bigger and better because the motorcycle community needs people like you. I wouldn’t be riding a motorcycle if it wasnt for your hard work. And i swear I check like 30+ times a day to see whats new. Keep it up!! Because you made this 20 year old college kid the happiest kid alive every day I turn my bike on and ride away whether to school, work, or highway 9. :)

      • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

        Thanks man, we’re here to help.

        Any time you have a question, just ask us. Comments or do an #AskRideApart thing on Facebook or twitter.

        • http://www.pattonstrength.com/ PattonStrength

          Is there a good guideline on how much, if any, an Alpinestars suit will stretch? Finally found one that 95% fits me.

          • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

            They’re not going to stretch much. Head down to the D-Store and see if any of those work, they tend to be a little more targeted as us athletic guys. If that doesn’t work, find a good leather alterations place, talk to them first, then buy a suit that fits your shoulders and has the right distance from crotch to neck and have the rest taken in.

      • ColinTheShots

        Highway 9?! Do you live in the Santa Cruz Mountains or the Bay Area?

        • Loren Andrews

          I live in San Jose.

          • ColinTheShots

            I live in the San Lorenzo Valley on the south side of Highway 9, but I’m still pretty new to riding so I haven’t gone up into the gnarly parts by Skyline yet. Still, awesome local road to drive on, until you get caught behind old people (which seems to happen every time unless it’s midnight).

            • Loren Andrews

              Dude we should go riding. I go to Highway 9 or 17 like every weekend. The best time to go is during the middle of the week at 11 am. No one is commuting. I just love the scenery and the smell of the trees. NOT going fast like the rest of my friends

              • ColinTheShots

                Once I get a little more confidence (lowsided because of gravel a little while ago and parents are still freaked about it) and put some more miles on I’ll remember we had this conversation and I’ll message you about exchanging email or phone #, because I only have 1 other friend that rides and he barely ever gets on his bike. Bear Creek Road has some pretty nice views and some nice corners too (although not the best road surfaces all over). I won’t forget you! haha

                • Loren Andrews

                  Im not saying we have to go to Highway or whatever. Im still new and I make mistakes but I make it a mission to ride everyday and practice what I need work on or at the very least watch other peoples mistakes. There is no problem riding with someone close to your skill and besides I never get to hang out with people on bikes.( All my friends bikes are broken from crashes and lack of repairs. They are squids) The best way to get confidence is to go out and ride and practice what you know you need. The first 2 months I fell over in a u-turn. After that I made it my mission to learn how to do it flawlessly and now I can do such tight turns all my friends wonder how a bike can turn that sharp. I guess what im trying to say is even though you need confidence you might as well go out riding with someone and practice together and mutually get better. For me I had no one but 1000′s of hours of youtube videos to learn from.

                • ColinTheShots

                  I remember reading in the “What to do after you crash” article and how Wes recommended you get back on as soon as possible, but my parents haven’t been letting me ride since I went down (as if a lack of practice will make me any safer). I should be back on sometime in February. I was riding every day, and I enjoy everywhere that doesn’t have massive traffic, and even then I can practice splitting (which is still a little sketchy for me).

                • Loren Andrews

                  Well good luck convincing your parents I have no words on how to do that. I simply told my parents that im paying for everything and there’s nothing you can do about it. Then I went out every day and practiced combined with watching like 6 hours of footage a day. I still haven’t told them that Ive just completed all the gear necessary for a track day but ill let them find out later.

                • ColinTheShots

                  Thanks, but the weird thing is that I’ve payed for everything (MSF class, insurance, bike, gear, etc) and I’m 19, but it’s my dad that’s been super against it the whole time (massive arguments over the safety of it haha). The thing my dad says he “can do about it” is kick me out :(
                  I’ve watched SO many motovlogs on how to ride, but there’s no really substitution for getting out and practicing. Plus, that’s the most fun part. I’m seriously dying from this lack of leaning. What kind of bike do you have and what track do you plan on going to? Laguna Seca? Infineon? That’s a great way to hone your skills.

                • Loren Andrews

                  Dang i guess thats the nice thing about live away from home in San Jose. NO one to tell me when I can ride. Im 20 Ive ridden for about 6 months. I ride a 2009 Kawasaki ninja 250. And I want to race either at chuckwalla, willow springs or Buttonwillow since they are all about 1-2 hours from my house back home in Bakersfield.

                • ColinTheShots

                  I have a 1999 Ninja 250, Kawi green of course, so at least in terms of acceleration I could potentially keep up with you (well, after I clean out my carbs in this next week or two)! I really don’t understand the stigma people have about 250s being slow after my first couple of months riding. You’re faster than most cars within the speed limit, you get awesome gas mileage, and you don’t have to worry much about killing yourself with your right wrist. You ever taken Stevens Canyon Road to get to 9?

                • Loren Andrews

                  Im so over people talking crap about 250s. I know i only have 25hp and Im grateful for it. All the mistakes I made could have been deadly on a 600 and Ive learned so much because of the bike. I run laps around my friends in turns and canyons all because I have better body position throttle control and more manageable weight. Would I like a bigger bike yes, do I need one no. Can I out turn and accelerate a car yes. Can I do so with 50 mpg yes. Every friend that I know who has started on a 600 has crashed at least twice and all there crashes were avoidable had they been knowledgeable. I even watched my friend crash in my mirror all because he didnt know his brakes, throttle and max lean angle. And to top it off I was on his friends Gixxer that I had been riding for 20 min and I still out maneuvered him on his CBR600RR that he had for 8 months. Thats the stupidity I see all day. That and almost every 600 at my school has been crashed, some twice because they are all noobs who talk crap to me while there bikes are rashed. I shake my head and wish that sometimes the US had tier licensing so kids couldn’t ride 600′s until 2-3 years of experience then we would have less morons on the road, less deaths, and cheaper insurance. And no ive never taken Stevens Canyon road to 9. :)

                • Piglet2010

                  Real Men™ start out on a liter-bike, dude!

                  (OK, I ride a 2004 Ninja 250R at the track.)

  • BlackSnake

    I wear an Alpinestars Atem suit for about a year now and don’t regret my choice so far. It’s not cheap, but to me it’s worth its money. The leather doesn’t show any imperfections and feels like nothing could scratch or pierce it. Besides it is they only suit having CE certified leathers to my knowledge. It vents really well even on the hottest summer days. The amor is comfortable to wear and the protectors are large enough to fully cover all important parts of the body. However, the major reason I picked the Atem suit was that it fits my size, although I’m a rather tall guy. With 6’4″ and about 176 lbs the standard sizes usually don’t fit me, but the Atem in EU size 54 if worn with a back protector fits me almost perfectly.

    • monjeanmarc

      In the motogp this year many riders have broken crack collarbone with Alpinestars: jorje lorenzo, pedrosa and bautista they crashed with alpinestars and broken bones and speed was not fast! How can you trust a brand like this? In fact i heard their protectors are made in china…

      • BlackSnake

        Life up to the presence. There is a lot of high quality stuff coming from China nowadays. The times when China has produced only cheap and crappy products belong to the past. Besides the engineering behind many products made in China is still done in Europe or the US.
        Breaking bones is part of the sport and no suit can eliminate the risk of it completely. There are also more factors than just speed which factor in whether your bones are braking or not. Your list is also a bit selective. You did not mention Marc Marquez in your list who is also wearing an Alpinestars suit and he had also a couple of crashes. At least one of them was at very high speed but he didn’t break a bone. So what does that tell? From all the bones the collarbone is one of the weakest spot of a motorcyclist. a) because its more fragile than your shin for instance and b) it is not as easy to protect by amor. I haven’t seen any suit so far which has protectors for the collarbone most probably because it would to much limit your ability to move. As far as I know the collarbone is most likely to break when your helmet is knocked down against your chest. The professional racing suits of Alpinestars do have among the best protection for your collarbone since they have an integrated airbag system which inflates around your chest in case of a crash to protect your collarbone. Therefore the examples you mentioned above are just a proof that even the most advanced protection system cannot avoid all sorts of injury.

        • monjeanmarc

          You’re right, I made a mistake: even marquez crashed collarbone in british motogp this year, and he’s also alpinestar!!!… not very funny for this brand Look here: http://www.crash.net/motogp/news/195209/1/marquez-injury-fears-after-warm-up-fall.html With other brands like deinese no other rider broke collarbone in motogp this year and look how many crashes for example hayden or crutchlow and bradley smith they had.

          • TP

            I don’t think Cal should be your bar for quality, his spidi suit came apart multiple times in crashes last season.

          • BlackSnake

            The article you cited just writes about a dislocated shoulder which is not quite the same as a broken collarbone.
            Anyway, even if it were broken this does not invalidate my argument from the previous post. None of the suits in the price range I can pay for and are listed above provide real collarbone protection. You would need an airbag system which only Dainese, A* and Spidi do offer but what I’m unable to pay for. Maybe the D-Air system is superior to that offer by A* if your home made statistics are right, but I don’t care because I can’t afford any of those. Above all Dainese just doesn’t fit me as I’m too tall for their cut. That said I’m still quite satisfied with my choice and would still recommend it to anyone as tall as me.

  • stever

    Re: Second-hand suits. When did armor go from being goofy foam to something that really reduces peak acceleration? Any chance you have an expert, engineer, or designer in your directory you can call and ask about that? Held Gmbh was only sort of helpful.

  • Renato Valenzuela

    Spyke! Got mine from a European retailer. $440 shipped from across the pond. Hows THAT for value? This article serves more as free advertising for all the brands that have US distribution already set up more than anything… $1200-1600 is practically half the price of my bike!

  • D rock

    Wes Siler,

    It might be good if you actually tested more suits before claiming that Dainese, A-stars, and Spidi take the win in this category. If you knew the details and inner workings of what makes a suit safe your audience might appreciate it more.

    • D rock

      How did the RS-Taichi suits work for you? What made these other suits better than the entry level Taichi suit, or did you not test that one either?

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      I don’t actually ride motorcycles, they’re dangerous.

      But yeah, an article on how suits are constructed and the differences between a good one and an el cheapo one sounds like a good idea. I’ll find a suit designer and make that happen.

      • Piglet2010

        Was your not for sale to the general public Icon suit custom tailored?

  • D rock

    My comments were deleted by WES SILER because it was contradictory to his opinions and it stated that the article was misleading.

  • lukeeye

    Working on the Atem… 6′-5″ at 225 and it’s the first 1-piece suit that’s ever fit off the rack!

  • Stuki

    No Vanson? I know you guys are tall, skinny, effeminate Eurotwigs and all :), but what’s wrong with Vanson suits in the same price range?

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Vanson makes great stuff and their custom suits do start at around this price point. Here, we wanted to focus on stuff that’s widely available to the majority of consumers.

  • Gabe

    Damn, this is the most heated comment board I’ve seen in a long time. Thanks Adey for the write up. Thanks to Wes, for responding to his readers.

  • Dave Mason

    Perhaps it’s been mentioned but IMO the RS Taichi WRX R303 should have been included. At $1,250 it is an outstanding value, widely available, high quality and used by many top AMA racers. Love my Taichi suit.

    • adeysworld

      I hear great things about their suits and gear. I haven’t tried any out yet.

      • Dave Mason

        Interesting. In my experience it is impossible to do a track day without seeing their suits. What is your location? I’m assuming you have track experience as that is the environment for the type of riding these suits are designed for? Taichi gear is very popular at the tracks in the Eastern United States.

        • adeysworld

          I didn’t say I’ve never seen the gear on the street or track. I just said I haven’t sampled any yet. And it’s not widely available, because you don’t normally see any store carrying RS Taichi suits on their rack. You have to either special order their suits or find the distributor near you.

          • Dave Mason

            Fair enough. Have you personally crashed in the suits you’ve reviewed here? Nothing short of surfing the pavement is truly sampling a track suit IMO.

            • adeysworld

              I’ve crash tested all of my suits. There’s a reason why I continue to wear Dainese…

        • Mitchel Durnell

          Hmm, I almost never see them here in Socal. I used to have their GMX Motion jacket, liked it a lot.

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      I talked to Taichi and asked if they’d like coverage. They didn’t seem to interested in reaching a new, younger audience. Sorry.

  • Steve Lam

    Wes,
    How do you feel about using two-piece suit for the track? I already spent the money on a perforated, armored, sport riding jacket from Vanson. It would obviously be more economical to spend another $400-500 on a matching pair of pants with a connectors and pucks.

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Does the jacket have a connection zipper that goes all the way around? If so, you’ll be fine. You won’t have quite the flexibility of a one piece, but you’ll get by.

    • Mitchel Durnell

      As Wes says it’s fine, but I have seen first hand the wicked lacerations caused by falling directly on the zipper junction during a crash and it didn’t look fun.

  • kevin

    Out of curiosity, just how much worse is a 2 piece suit than the sort of products showcased above? My local track allows 2 piece suits in the novice class and I’d like to try some track riding without the $1000+ investment in a 1 piece when I already have an alpinestars jacket with the 360 degree zipper for a matching set of pants. So I was thinking I’d spend a few hundred dollars on a pair of pants for this season and if I get addicted to track riding I’ll save up for a one piece next year. Does that seem reasonable?

    • Dave Mason

      1. You WILL become an addict 2. Most people spend a season in Novice, so just get your feet, err, legs wet with appropriate new pants and worry about a new suit later. It will be a drop in the bucket alongside the new track-only bike, trailer, generator, toy hauler, tow vehicle, etc. LOL

  • Jonno

    I think the spidi looks best when I’m ona my scooter. Now back to that article on how to get my knee down …

    • Piglet2010

      I wear a Roadcrafter while riding a scooter.

  • Mason Apostol

    I have a Teknic suit that I bought on Craigslist to dip my toes into track days. I believe Teknic is now out of business. This is another reason why buying one of the “big” brands may be a good idea — the market for suits isn’t huge, and getting repairs or warranty coverage is an issue on such a big purchase.

    My main complaints are that the suit is heavy and hard to get on. It means that between sessions, I was forced to choose whether to be slightly hot and uncomfortable, or very uncomfortable for a few minutes getting the suit on and off.

    My next suit will definitely be one of the type suggested. Resale on them will probably be pretty good, too.

    • Mitchel Durnell

      Resale on suits is very poor; they are niche items that have a very small pool of prospective buyers, most of which believe you probably just funked up your suit with sweat (which we all do).

    • Piglet2010

      Are you wearing one-piece riding technical underwear? That will turn getting a suit on and off from a life-or-death struggle into a mere pain-in-the-arse.

  • Heather McCoy

    My personal fav: The Arlen Ness Lady Mag Looks, feels, protects like a $2,500 suit, easy. Though they no longer make the one with the “dragon tattoo”, the newer version is every bit as nice. Why they don’t make more track stuff is beyond me.
    http://revgirl.com/arlen-ness-lady-mag-suit-the-suit-with-the-dragon-tattoo/

    • Mitchel Durnell

      Arlen Ness seems to have incredibly little US representation, but their suits do come here in some way or another. They are a sub-brand of Madif, which is the source of the dragon symbol.

  • Daniel Hatcher

    “Thin guys with broad shoulders are left to deal with the baggy-diaper-butt look or dish out extra cash for a custom suit.” ….. Are you kidding me, every suit in your write up is made to fit exactly that body type. The average American adult rider would never fit any of those suits.

    • Mitchel Durnell

      No, the suits above are meant for us that are more Spaniard shaped; I am 155lb and 5’9″ but my more narrow (euro?) shoulders let me correctly wear a Dainese 40/50, where someone with broader shoulders would be forced to move up a size.

    • Piglet2010

      Exactly why I ended up with a Cortech suit instead.

  • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

    365 is absolutely the truth. I don’t own a car. The first track day of the season was last weekend. One day this winter, which is the coldest winter in recorded history, we had to “take it easy” around a couple turns in the canyons because it was icy.

    And i didnt say they were all world class. I said we had a majority of world class tracks.
    Sonoma and Laguna are without exception.
    Streets of willow brings the number of tracks the entire world is currently racing on in Gran Tourismo to three.
    The track they run at IMS for moto gp is different than the one they ran for formula one.
    While IMS may have started as an oval track for bikes in the early 1900′s, The history of road racing begins and ends with moto gp.
    And there are no track days, club races or anything on IMS. Kevin Schwanz’ school means you can ride it once. You can also ride in an Indy car onit once.
    If you don’t like drugs, move to Dubai. Indiana’s got em too.
    Laguna Seca is simply too small to house enough people to pay the Dorna fees.
    Laguna Seca brought in more people on it’s last year than COTA brought in on it’s first.

    I think that about covers it. And keep in mind, the point of all of this, which i think has been lost here, is to explain NOT why we SHOULD have a huge knowledge base in the bay area, it’s to explain why we DO Have a huge knowledge base in the bay area.

  • Piglet2010

    It is also nice to live in an area that lacks professional bike theft rings, ridiculously overpriced housing, over-crowding, air pollution, gangs, and general social immaturity.

    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      there you go. A nice consolation prize for not having the best motorcycle scene in america, and one of the best in the world. See? There’s nothing to cry about.

  • RyanG

    I’d personally recommend a Pilot suit. These guys make stuff for companies like Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha but are now releasing things under their own label.

    http://www.webbikeworld.com/r5/pilot-trans-urban-jacket/review.htm

    http://www.pilotmotosport.com/evo_suits/

    Their Evo suits seem to be in the price range of all those other suits mentioned here and they have plenty of clout to support the quality of their products. Value for money seems to be quite high (although I’ve not tested their stuff myself, just a suggestion of something to look at).

    The Evo Fit sample suits are even on sale currently for 850 bucks (from 1600).