2014 KTM 450 Rally Replica — Put A Dakar Rally Winner In Your Garage

News -

By

2014 KTM 450 Rally Replica

Fully living up to the brand’s “Ready to Race” tagline, this 2014 KTM 450 Rally Replica is an exact copy of the bike Marc Coma rode to victory in this year’s Dakar. It can be yours for just $33,000.

“It was expected that the competition would be stronger in the 2014 Dakar Rally,” states KTM CEO Stefan Pierer. “We now want to pass on the experience of such a successful time in this year’s Dakar to any rider who wishes to own this fantastic bike, and especially to those who are committed to making their rally dreams come true or realise their Dakar ambition. The racing service we offer for privateers is as fundamentally strong as the service we give to our factory riders and we are very proud of helping many riders achieve their goals in the rally.”

2014 KTM 450 Rally Replica
Note how slim this bike is; the clear front fairing enables the rider to see the front wheel.

Where the previous 450 Rally was still based on a platform hailing from the 690cc era, this new bike was designed from the ground up to take full advantage of the new, smaller motor. As such, it’s said to be considerably slimmer and, with a dry weight of just 308 lbs, considerably more capable over low-speed, technical terrain. Further aiding riders in those conditions is a slim, carbon “tower” at the front supporting the instruments, road book and transponder while still allowing the rider to see the front wheel through the transparent front fairing.

2014 KTM 450 Rally Replica
Can you spot the fuel tanks? Two hang down each side of the engine and two live on either side of the tail.

KTM isn’t releasing performance specs for the motor, but the 450cc single-cylinder uses a single overhead cam configuration and is fuel-injected. Two fuel tanks are mounted saddle-style at the front and two are incorporated into the tail unit for a total capacity of 8.7 gallons. The rider can switch between front and rear tanks, enabling them to tailor the bike’s weight distribution to specific terrain.

2014 KTM 450 Rally Replica
On this new 450, KTM targeted rider friendliness in the form of improved ergonomics, slimmer dimensions and new rear suspension.

Suspension is handled by KTM’s house brand, WP, and is 48mm USD forks at the front and a monoshock at the rear complete with a newly-designed linkage system.

Putting a fine point on the bike’s superiority, 2nd place Dakar finisher Jordi Viladoms hadn’t even swung a leg over the bike before this year’s race kicked off in Argentina.

  • Guy

    Do want. Is it street legal too?

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      Dakar bikes all wear plates. Actual road legality is a trickier matter.

      • Lourens Smak

        the Dakar is on normal roads for quite a large part. For the 2014 edition it was 3500 km, their site says. This is all part of the liaison routes, the timed special stages are all off-road and dirt-roads of course. These liaison parts are not timed but you are also required to ride them… (while obeying speed limits!) The rally bikes still don’t seem to be 100% street-legal though, there’s probably some special exception why these bikes don’t need at least one mirror, and indicator lights, and so on… (or maybe the roads are declared “special’ for the race day?)

        Here’s a clip of what it looks like, imagine doing a few hours of this before, and after, each 300km rally-stage…
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4WWZysfiOk

  • Brandon Mussman

    Why is seeing the front wheel so important?

    • cocoa classic

      Seeing what is beyond/around the front tire while moving slowly can be quite beneficial.

  • grb

    Awesome

  • John

    A dumbed down version would be nice for those of us not intending to win a rally. Based on the new 375 motor, please.

    • Reid

      Out of control. I’d be all over it.

    • Nathan Haley

      KTM 690 Enduro R comes to mind.

      • John

        A little more dumbed down please. Not retarded, mind you, but, you know, less power, lower price, short seat height. Could even have a 19″ and 17″ wheels. 30″ inseam, if my legs haven’t shrunk.

        • Justin McClintock

          I think you just asked for a 350 EXC-F.

          EDIT: With a lowering kit.

          • John

            A huge one! 38″ seat height. That’s my point. If you cut the wheel size slightly, the chassis size slightly, the suspension slightly, you can easily make a fun, highly capable bike, that might not WIN, but will hlghly entertain. 34″ is the max I can really do. 32″ is a lot more pleasant.

            • Justin McClintock

              I think the chassis might be what’s killing you. Well, that and the engine. 4 stroke engines are just plain tall, and since everybody seems to be accustomed to that, they make the 2 strokes just as tall (even though they don’t have to).

              • John

                Also, the G450X was a nice bike, but it seemed trying to walk on stilts. The height, IMO, even when just riding, made it less stable, less agile in corners or difficult terrain. An advantage if you can simply fly over obstacles in a straight line, but I’m not used to the ‘bike on stilts’ type of turning, which is to say, didn’t like turning much. I think the fascination with the longest suspension possible is at its limits because you get to the point where the bike can’t win at all because it can’t turn and the Cg is way too high.

            • Stuki

              If you cut the wheel size, regardless of how slightly, you immediately have zero availability of tires suitable for a bike like this.

          • Nathan Haley

            Uhhhh 350 EXC-F service intervals?

            http://www.ktm.com/uploads/tx_downloadsplugin/Servicezeiten_2013_10_EN.pdf

            Also terrible on the road.

            What John’s asking for is a Honda CRF250L.

            • Stuki

              The new excs are much better on the road than their reputation has it; as long as they are properly geared and shod. People are turning them into street legal ‘tards all over the place.

              • Nathan Haley

                As someone who had an EXC: Yeah, you can do it, but it’ll cost twice as much, be half as comfortable and require oil changes about 3 times more often. If you’re not going to race (or ride like you’re going to race), race bikes aren’t worth it.

            • John

              Actually, a CRF250L with the engine stroked to perfectly square, which would give it more torque and 350cc. And make it more worth it’s [hefty] weight. I see a Freeride in my future.

            • fergushammond

              Or a WR250R

  • Reid

    Money being no object, is this the ultimate adv/enduro motorcycle?

    • http://RideApart.com/ Wes Siler

      No, it’s a race bike specifically designed for rally races.

    • Nathan Haley

      Dakar bikes are designed to go a thousand miles or so WFO and then be completely rebuilt. Even lightweight ADV bikes should go at least 1,500-3,000mi on the road between any kind of basic maintenance. And good luck stapling luggage onto that delicate frame that is already laden with fuel tanks.

    • Justin McClintock

      No. That would be an XR650R with a plate.

      • Piglet2010

        Which is getting impossible to do in most places – unless you have the connections to be loaned a manufacturer’s plate (e.g. back in the 1980′s Porsche loaned the head of TAG manufacturer plates so he could drive a 935 on the road – payback for sponsoring the F1 engine program).

        • Justin McClintock

          I think the only way you really pull that off now is to know (and trust) somebody in a state that does allow it. I know here in GA, you can’t do it. But you can “sell” the bike to somebody in a state that does allow it. Then they title it. Then it comes back to GA on a title instead of a “offroad use only” MSO. If it comes in on a title, you’re fine.

          But you’ve got to know what states allow it and be really friendly with whoever’s doing it for you. Technically the bike is theirs when they get the title.

    • Stuki

      I know it’s not what you had in mind, but just the thought of this racehorse being loaded down with 100lbs of Touratech bling, overheating in bumper to bumper suburban traffic on the way to Starbucks with some old fatso decked out in Klim on board (that’d be me), makes me want to cry……..

  • Bones Over Metal
    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      That thing is really cool. Wish it was available in the states.

  • Nathan Haley

    This will be perfect for getting me to Starbucks when there are LEAVES on the driveway.

    • Stuki

      With that new clear fairing, it’s so much easier to avoid those nasty wet leaves that tries to sully your new $300 Dakar speck front tire…….

  • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

    Now if this was a honda dualsport spr with high end components and priced in the lower 20k….

  • Tommaso Gomez

    Any guess on the power output? Also, why is it about the same weight as the 690 R? I would expect it to be a little lighter, given the race spec and smaller displacement.

    • Stuki

      Add the fairing, the multiple tanks (with pumps and plumbing) and the instrument “tower” to the 690, and I bet it’ll end up 30-40lbs heavier than this.

  • John Tiedjens

    But they didn’t mention it’s 33K…. hahaha.. that’s ….well….. I don’t know what that is? The CEO was quoted ” they want to share the experience..” That’s pretty far from sharing by my estimation! Almost down right avaricious. I’m mean it’s really cool but HeyZues Christo’s Pajamas on a Cracker….that’s a lotta semolians!

    • Stuki

      “Sharing the experience” of racing in the Dakar is never going to be cheap. A bike is only the start of it. And if this bike is as close to the actual race winner’s factory bike as KTMs CEO make it sound; at $33k it pretty much relieves anyone with anything resembling a realistic Dakar budget, of having to settle for an obviously “lesser” bike.

      Could you imagine being able to plop down to your local Honda shop and pick up a bike almost entirely the same as their latest motoGP prototypes for $33k?

      I don’t think the intention ever was of allowing anyone out there who just wanted some sort of dirt bike, to have one like Coma’s.

      • John Tiedjens

        Yes Stuki I understand it’s actually buying a factory ride not just some dirt bike. LOL! I guess as that goes it’s very impressive and I’m a KTM fan anyhoo so. BUT as prices on all bikes seems to continually soar skyward my salary doesn’t. I’m just ranting cuz I’m jelly!

      • Piglet2010

        The Honda RCV1000R is $1.6 million to buy, and if you want a seamless gearbox, you can lease one for $700,000/year.

  • Baba

    Yum!

  • Piglet2010

    “It was expected that the competition would be stronger in the 2014 Dakar Rally,” states KTM CEO Stefan Pierer.

    Yes, if not for a costly navigation error, Joan Barreda would have likely won this year on a Honda.