How Do Motorcycle Quick Shifters Work?

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Motorcycle Quick Shifter

Hold the throttle open, bump the shift lever up and you just keep going, seamlessly engaging another gear without disrupting acceleration. Magic. But, how to motorcycle quick shifters work?

The average motorcyclist focusing on perfect upshifts will usually complete the task in around 600 milliseconds. That’s 600 milliseconds to pull in the clutch, briefly roll off the throttle, move the gear shift lever, blip the throttle, and re-engage the clutch. Even skilled riders performing clutchless upshifts only drop that number to 300 milliseconds, and that still requires deft hands and impeccable throttle timing. If they’re sport riding and also concerned with body position, evaluating corners, executing proper lines and assessing road factors, that average time can go up. Our conscious thoughts have a lag time of 80 milliseconds, meaning there is a discrepancy in what happens and when our brains perceive it happening clocking in at slightly less than a hundredth of a second. So what if we wanted to have perfect upshifts performed entirely in 50 milliseconds or less? That’s where quick shifters come in.

Most of us grasp the concepts behind shifting gears, the use of the clutch and transmission, and the relation to engine speed and thus road speed. The clutch provides a way to incrementally and linearly engage/disengage the power from the engine’s crankshaft, acting as a sort of go-between for the engine and the transmission. When switching gears, we briefly cut power with the clutch and the throttle and smoothly reapply it in order to minimize a disruptive or harsh re-engagement of engine parts. So how can we take such a complex action and effectively squeeze down its operation time to double digit milliseconds and still retain seamless transitions? Surprisingly, in most cases all that is required is a sensor and access to a bikes’ ECU (Engine Control Unit).

Since quick shifters dispense with the rider having to fiddle about with the clutch and throttle, we have to inform the engine and ECU of gear changes just as they happen. The way this is achieved in most cases is by simply replacing the gear shift rod with another gear shift rod incorporating a mechanical sensor, which is then connected to the ECU. Under acceleration, as your foot moves the gear shift lever upwards, this mechanical sensor informs the ECU of an impending gear change. The ECU either cuts the ignition or cuts fueling to the engine ever so briefly (as little as 15 milliseconds), to take the extreme inertial forces off the drivetrain just long enough to neatly slot the next gear into place with minimal fuss. This ECU intervention mimics the throttling off and on of our gear changes, but six times faster than we can perceive it and perfectly every time.

As with most emerging tech, there are minor variances in how it can work. Some quick shifters rely on a type of positional sensor, which reads the physical state of the gear shift lever and informs the ECU in a change of position. Others use pressure sensors in the transmission itself, relying on the drivetrain pressure created by shifting without throttle adjustment to actuate the ECU response. Riders with older and/or mechanically carbureted bikes can enjoy quick shifters that use a direct link to the ignition coil. Roughly the exact same series of events happen, except instead of altering timing via the ECU, the ignition coil electrical supply is briefly interrupted.

Quickshifters, along with ABS and Traction Control, are fast becoming standard equipment on some of the sportier offerings from today’s manufacturers. BMW provides a quick shifter as standard on their S1000RR. Their new R1200RT has a neat little trick offered by the BMW Gear Shift Assistant Pro option, which allows for quick, precise, and smooth upshifts and downshifts. Aprilia also offers it as standard on their RSV4 and new Tuono, with their AQS (Aprilia Quick Shift) system including a secondary sensor in the gearbox that determines the currently engaged gear to further refine upshifts. MV Agusta and Ducati supply quick shifters as standard on some models, and Triumph offers a quick and easy bolt on option for the Daytona 675R.

If you’re interested in retrofitting your bike with a quickshifter, a number of third parties provide custom alternatives to fit your specific bike. Power Commander’s Dynojet Quick Shifter can be made to fit your bike with a traditional shift rod position/pressure sensor, a “travel sensor” if your shift rod is incompatible, or a handlebar mounted switch to prime a quick gear change. The Bazzaz Quick Shift allows you to change the engine “kill times” for each gear individually. The HM Quick Shifter has accurate sensors and fewer moving parts, resulting in fewer failure rates. Many, many more options are available online and elsewhere for whatever you might need.

As amazing as quick shifters are, they don’t provide an advantage to poor or lazy riders. Riding with a quick shifter still requires riders to be intentional with their shifting. It’s not really great tech to be using in stop-and-go, in-town traffic or low speeds. They do provide a massive improvement in shifting times, and create consistent throttle throughout shifting. This prevents the traditional issue of upsetting a bike’s suspension with an imperfect shift, affecting stability through corners. Quick shifters will be great for eking out those few extra seconds on the track, and a novelty on public roads, but really they’re all about having loads of fun changing gears faster than our human perception can comprehend.

Do you have a quick shifter on your motorcycle? Are they worth getting just for the fun of it?

  • Justin McClintock

    I’ve often wondered what kind of impact clutchless shifting in general (obviously including the use of quick shifters) has on trasmission durability. I would think it wouldn’t necessarily be doing the transmission any favors. Obviously if you’re dealing with a race bike you probably don’t care. But if you’re dealing with something you want to use as a commuter for potentially 50K+ miles, I’d begin to worry about that kinda thing. I guess I need to motorcycle transmission design a little more to help answer my question, although somebody here might have some insight.

    • Pat

      If done properly, clutchless upshifting will have no negative impact on
      transmission life. If done in an automobile, it would likely damage the
      synchos, but since bike trannies don’t have them its fine.

      • Justin McClintock

        See, that doesn’t really make sense to me. The synchos in a car are there to help get the teeth on the collar and the gear spinning at roughly the same velocity prior to engagement. Clutchless shifting in a car won’t really damage the synchronizers at all, it will damage the teeth on the collar or gear where they engage because the synchros simply don’t have time to do their jobs. With bike transmission, I guess we’re working under the assumption that there’s so little mass behind each leg of the system that they’re not that collar teeth and gear teeth aren’t that likely to hurt each other anyway, so sychros aren’t necessary. But that kind goes out the window if you’re still apply power (albeit reduced, but it’s still there) and more importantly adding mass to the system because the clutch still has the entire engine coupled to the input side. So it would stand to reason that clutchless shifting WOULD be detrimental to the teeth that engage the shifting collars to the gears.

        • Pat

          Any energy coming through the input shaft will reach the synchonizers before it reaches the next gear because it allows the collar and gear to make frictional contact before the dog teeth do. Take a look at what a syncho looks like, its basically a gear with V-shaped teeth to make it slot into the next gear easier. Clutchless shifting in a car will cause the splines on the synchos to wear out as they are not meant to operate when there is power coming through the input shaft.

          • Justin McClintock

            Yeah, I guess I hadn’t considered the thought of the synchros sliding along the length of the splines while trying to transmit power. That would be bad for them and the shaft splines. Good point.

        • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

          I dont even know how a quickshifter in a car would work. To match revs in a car you have to double clutch because you can’t rev match with the clutch pulled in. On a bike you just shift. Now I agree with you that you want the wear on the clutch pack (cheaper, quicker to replace, etc.) the clutch pack’s only going to scrub wear if there’s a discrepancy between the rear tire (tranny) and the engine. If a power commander/quick shifter knows exactly what rpm you need to be at for what speed in what gear, then it’s taking out all of the guesswork for you.

          • Ben Mcghie

            A quickshift for a car is just a sequential manual gearbox. With the exception of rally cars, I’ve never seen a car with a paddle shift/sequential gear box that required the use of the clutch for shifting. There’s nearly an infinite variety of what car manufacturers have done with regards to seamless shifting using automatic transmissions with user-selectable gears, or true sequential manual transmissions mated to electronic rev matching capabilities. If you can imagine it, chances are somewhere somebody has made that variety of “quick shifting” transmission for a car.

            Kr Tong: double clutching is necessary to rev match in a car? Maybe in a big diesel truck… but not in most cars I have driven. Once you get used to the ratio in the transmission, and the speed at which the engine gains/loses rpm, there is no need to double clutch. The transmission input shaft doesn’t have enough momentum to interfere with your shift in most cars, because it is so light the clutch will easily slow it down to the engine speed required for the next gear.

            • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

              A sequential manual gearbox is a type of transmission found in motorcycles and some race cars. A quick-shifter would be a device designed for it.

              Also i didnt say you couldnt rev match without double clutching. Like you said, you can rev match by letting out the clutch. I said, “To match revs in a car you have to double clutch because you can’t rev match with the clutch pulled in.”

              • Ben Mcghie

                My point was that I haven’t seen a sequential manual in a car (except some rally cars) that doesn’t make use of the ECU to alter fuel/ignition as you pull the paddle… ie they already do the exact thing you’re installing a quickshifter to achieve.

                Maybe I’m still missing something in your wording for that second part though. When I downshift my truck, I’m on the brakes, press the clutch to the floor, and hold it there while I select the lower gear I want, toe the gas, and then let the clutch pedal back up. Done correctly, it is seamless and doesn’t slip the clutch. What am I missing here? Confused.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  You’re not rev matching you’re just letting the clutch out.

                • Thomas

                  Tong, think you might have some misunderstanding on how automotive transmission work. Flywheel is connected directly to the crank shaft, just like any bike. As matter of fact, a dry single plate clutch design such as the ones on flat twin BMW (other than the newer water head engine) is exactly the same as the ones found in a traditional H gate transmission used in cars.

                  Suggest you look up heel to toe downshifting, commonly used in cars for quick downshift during abrupt deceleration.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  “Heel toeing” just means you’re covering the brake while you double clutch. What’s your point?

                • Thomas

                  Heel to toe downshift does not require double clutching. Please look up the actual definition of both terms before starting dismissing and down voting others comment. ;)

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Yes, it does.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  Yes, I change the speed of the flywheel… just as the gearing in the transmission uses the force from the driveshaft to alter the speed of the input shaft before the clutch mates the two systems back together. The better you get at it, the less the clutch slips. This is also how it is POSSIBLE, however difficult, to shift smoothly without using the clutch at all. You can rip the transmission out of gear and, while in neutral, match your engine speed to the given road/gear speed. It is much harder… but it can be done. With or without syncromesh gears. It’s just really, really difficult to do.

                  Rev matching can be done entirely without any sort of clutch system. That’s kinda the point.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  Answer me this then: if all I’m doing blipping the throttle is changing flywheel speed… what the heck do you think the clutch does when I let it out?

                  I’ll tell you this, unless you’re shifting really aggressively, it ain’t doing a single thing to the transmission or drivetrain. Sorry, that part of the system is fixed to a given road speed and gear.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  “rev matching” would be when you match the speed of the transmission with the speed of the engine. In a manual car, when the clutch is in, the transmission is completely disengaged, so the only way for you to speed up the transmission to match the speed of the engine is when the clutch is engaged, ie in neutral. So you giving it gas while the clutch is out doesnt do anything. On a bike, it does.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  Yes….? And if you have a neutral between every gear, you can rip it out of gear, use throttle to change flywheel speed to match the transmission speed that will be dictated by the next selected gear… and then shift. No clutch needed, with sufficient skill. A single clutch disengagement allows for all of these operations while slipping a bit upon reengagment to compensate for driver error with the throttle.

                  You don’t need to double clutch.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Your english sucks but “And if you have a neutral between every gear” sounds like double clutching to me. Also, flywheel speed doesn’t matter.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  WTF? In a run-of-the-mill manual transmission car, you can find neutral in between every gear. You don’t need to use the clutch pedal for this.

                  Flywheel speed DOES matter, hugely. Go redline the engine (on any bike or car) while stationary. Then let the clutch out to get into first gear. Let me know how long your clutch lasts.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Yeah, and how do you engage neutral? I’m expecting a lightbulb to turn on any minute here.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  In a car? I usually pull the damn shifter towards the middle of the shift pattern. You know, where the N is marked. Or where the lever wobbles all over the place. That neutral. The one the lever moves through every time you shift to another gear.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  You still havent engaged neutral until you release the clutch. Cmon man you’re so close to getting this.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  I never even have to touch the clutch to “engage” neutral. All neutral is is a lack of any gear dog clutches inside the transmission being engaged.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Annnnd now i give up.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  Perhaps the confusion is we are talking about different types of transmissions?

                  I agree I can’t grab neutral between gears on a bike. I apologize if you thought I was talking about a bike transmission.

                  In a stick shift car though, with neutral available at any time with or without clutch use… a very skilled driver could theoretically drive without a clutch, and not damage the transmission. He certainly doesn’t have to use the clutch twice on every shift.

                  Try reading this page. It should cover all the confusion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manual_transmission

                • Ben Mcghie

                  This whole page is what you need, but in particular the paragraph listed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_clutch#Manual_transmission_shifting

                • Piglet2010

                  I have driven a syncromesh car with a blown clutch master cylinder. To up-shift, let off the throttle, pull the gear lever to neutral, let the engine revs drop while applying gentle pressure to the lever, and when revs match the transmission will slip into the next highest gear. To go down a gear, shift to neutral, blip the throttle, put gentle pressure on the gear lever, and the shift will again happen when revs match.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  I knew I wasn’t insane. Thanks for verifying, Piglet.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  You’re still wrong, because he’s engaged in neutral while he’s doing it. If you don’t have the clutch out it doesn’t work. He’s effectively double clutching without the clutch.

                • Piglet2010

                  About 110K miles on the 1994 Civic Si I used to have – I flogged that poor car quite hard for 11 years.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  If I’m accelerating, then I won’t blip the throttle on an upshift. All I have to do is either stay in neutral (car) or clutch (bike/sequential) until the new LOWER engine speed matches the SAME road speed with the HIGHER gear ratio of the next gear I’m choosing.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Holy mother of god, nobody’s talking about upshifts.

                • Ben Mcghie

                  I was talking about any kind of shift, in general. You do not need to use the clutch TWICE to perform a single shift.

                • Justin McClintock

                  You two are talking about two completely different things.

                  Kr Tong is talking about double clutching as it would apply to any transmission without synchronizers. In that case, yes, letting the clutch out while in neutral is necessary to be able to easily engage the next gear. Sychronizers make that totally unnecessary though. And pretty much every car sold (at least in the US) since about 1975 has had a synchronized transmission. Some heavy duty trucks didn’t for a long time (some still might not), but everything else does. For the record, if the car doesn’t have a synchronized transmission, you need to double clutch on downshifts and upshifts both.

                  Seems Ben is talking about rev matching as to how it would apply to downshift in a car WITH a synchronized transmission. In that case, you don’t have to worry about the speed of the transmission itself as the synchronizers will handle that. The only thing you need to do is match the engine/flywheel speed to the speed of the pressure plate prior to engagement so as not to have to slide the clutch or jerk the car around. And on downshifts, a simple blip of the throttle once in gear but prior to releasing the clutch will handle that just fine, just like Ben stated.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Nnnot quite. Synchros are between the shift lever and the input shaft. If you have bad synchros in second gear you can’t even select the gear you can’t select it from third. I’m sure you’ve experienced this before when you tried to select the gear you wanted and all you hear is grinding. That grinding is your synchros.

                  What you guys are still talking about is NOT rev matching. You’re talking about letting out the clutch slowly to allow the transmission to gradually match the speed of the engine. Rev matching is different in that you blip the throttle while in neutral spinning up the inputshaft to the speed of the motor then shifting. Think of it like a bicycle. The lower the gear you’re in, the faster you have to pedal to go the same speed, so when you downshift you need your transmission to be pedalling faster.

                • Justin McClintock

                  Calling people names on the internet isn’t going to increase your understanding of transmissions. You’re talking about double clutching. That and rev matching are two completely different things.

                  Rev matching does not require a release of the clutch petal while in neutral. The sole purpose of rev matching is to get the engine to the same speed as the transmission input shaft once the transmission has engaged a lower gear. It’s accomplished by simply blipping the throttle prior to releasing the clutch so you don’t have to slide the clutch to achieve a smooth downshift. The synchronizers will have already taken care of matching the relative speeds of the gears to their shaft during engagement of the gear. That’s their only job and it specifically eliminates the need to push the clutch in a second time while in neutral (double clutching). The only time double clutching is ever usually needed in a car with a fully synchronized transmission is when going into reverse because reverse is almost never synchronized for a whole host of reasons. And even then it’s usually not necessary if the car has come to a complete stop.

                  EDIT: And for the record, the reason this wouldn’t work on a car is because cars are rarely sequential transmissions. If you had a car with a sequential transmission, a quick shifter would, in fact, work on it, although it would be hard on the synchronizers as it wouldn’t give them sufficient time to do their job. It’s always hard on the synchronizers if you shift too hard/quickly.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  No, rev matching is to get the input shaft to the same speed as the engine.

                • Justin McClintock

                  You seem to be trying to put words in other people’s mouths solely for the purpose of disagreeing with them. Nobody ever said simply slowly releasing the clutch was rev matching. Ever. Blipping the throttle specifically to speed up the engine so you DON’T have to slowly release the clutch is rev-matching.

                  And you’re right, synchronizers don’t match engine speed to transmission speed. Nobody ever claimed that. What synchronizers do is they match the speed of the input side of the transmission to the output side while the clutch is separating the engine from the transmission. THEN you rev match the engine to the input side of the transmission by blipping the throttle to accelerate the engine speed to match the input side of the transmission, which has been sped up to match the output side already by the synchronizers.

                  I don’t know what else to tell you. That’s how they work. Go to a junkyard, grab an old transmission out of some early 80′s car and take it apart. You’ll learn a lot.

                  Oh, and for the record, if you downshift with a sequential transmission without blipping the throttle to rev-match, you’ll jerk the crap out of the car (or motorcycle) when you let the clutch back out (unless the car already does it for you, which many newer sequential manuals do, but those typically handle clutch duties for you as well).

                  On that note, I’m done with this. You don’t understand transmissions. That’s fine. Go talk to somebody at Tremec or Getrag. Or I’d tell you to go ask a mechanical engineer. But I am one. And you still don’t get it.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  And after you blip the throttle, what is it you’re doing? You’re releasing the clutch slowly until the transmission matches the engine. In other words you havent rev matched because if you did you wouldnt need to wait for the transmission and the engine to synch up.

                  Synchros aren’t between the input and output shafts. They are between your gear lever and the input shaft.

                • Justin McClintock

                  “And after you blip the throttle, what is it you’re doing? You’re
                  releasing the clutch slowly until the transmission matches the engine.”

                  In a word, no. Again, you don’t get it.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  For someone who doesnt even know where the synchros are, what are the sheer odds of you being right?

                • Justin McClintock

                  You’re confusing the location of components with their function. Again, just go get an old transmission and take it apart. You’ll learn a ton from it.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  I’m a mechanic. Please shut up.

                • Justin McClintock

                  I’m a mechanical engineer. And I have a car with a stick, and have since the mid 90′s when I learned to drive. And you’re still wrong on rev matching. I’m just trying to help here. But whatever. Just don’t try to talk to anybody who actually drives a stick. You’ll come off looking like you don’t know what you’re talking about. Because you don’t.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  That’s right. You’re a mechanical engineer, not someone who has any clue how to drive a car or race one for that matter. Now go look up what synchros do. They’re between your shift lever and your input shaft. They match the link collar to the gear you selected. They do NOT “match the speed of the input side of the transmission to the output side” that’s what your first, second, third fourth, etc gears do. They go to the counter shaft and then to the drive shaft.

                  Secondly, REV MATCHING means you’ve already matched the speed of the engine and tranny together. Now tell me, going from third to second, how do you SPEED UP the transmission BEFORE you shift into second? Explain that without a double clutch.

                  Annnd go.

                • Justin McClintock

                  You think I don’t know what I’m talking about. I know you don’t know what you’re talking about. I’m done.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  So go for it. Explain how you speed up the tranny before you go into second.

                • Justin McClintock

                  The only way I’m explaining anything to you at this point is if I’m in front of you in person with a torn apart manual transmission. Otherwise I’m wasting my time.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  because that’s all you know. You have no clue how to do it in real life, and therein lies the language barrier.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  And yes. A sequential gearbox IS the diference between a car and a motorcycle transmission. You could’ve read my second post to know that.

    • 200 Fathoms

      I’ve read a number of threads where experienced riders claim that it’s actual *better* for the transmission not to use the clutch. I don’t really get it either.

      • Pat

        Well your clutch plates will last longer at the very least. It may be better on the gears because there is no more load on them from the constant engaging and disengaging of the clutch when upshifting. This is difficult to verify, however.

        • timmaxcoll

          The guys where I get my bike serviced are against shifting up without the clutch. They say everyone who does it eventually ruins their transmission.

          Of course everyone taking their bike there might just be doing it wrong…

          • Ben Mcghie

            All I know is when I clutchless upshift poorly, it does a number on the bike which is surely bad for the gears. When done right, you don’t feel a thing.

            I’m going to go out on a limb and say if your shift isn’t upsetting the bike… you’re putting less strain on the transmission than whacking the throttle open does.

            • Piglet2010

              In general, clutch-less up-shifts only work well when the engine is under a decent load – if you are tooling slowly around short-shifting, using the clutch is better. For full acceleration shifts, such as one would perform at the track, clutch-less is better.

    • Braden

      I’ve wondered the same thing, but I don’t know enough about the design intricacies of motorcycle transmissions to consider the durability issues. My only point in its favor is that if manufacturers are fitting these standard with full factory warranties, they must have at least some confidence in the transmission design. Perfectly timed, computer aided upshifts must be better than some numpty hamfistedly making his way through the gears.

  • Justin McClintock

    BTW, I really liked this article. Hadn’t ever really thought of how they work before, but it’s really pretty simplistic and effective.

  • das not compute

    I R Confused-ed… do you still use the clutch with a quick shifter?

    • Pat

      No….that would kinda defeat the purpose of having one

  • Pat

    Call me a Luddite but I would prefer to do all the work myself as developing and exercising skill is an important aspect to the overall enjoyment to the sport. If the electronic gadgetry can do it all for me then what is even the point in even going out and risking my neck?

    • Chris Carter

      If you were a Luddite, you’d be walking (i.e., doing all the work yourself).

      Traditional motorcycling, like traditional driving of automobiles, calls for a level of mechanical engagement which can be reduced when more advanced, less traditional technologies are introduced. For some, this reduction of mechanical engagement is distasteful (represented by people who’d rather ride an old Norton than a new BMW, for example). For others, reduction of mechanical engagement through technological advancement represents a potentially purer distillation of the act of motorcycling (like Wes’ enthusiasm for riding the Mission RS). I think we’re fortunate to live in a time when a broad array of tastes can be served, thus broadening (one hopes) the appeal of motorcycling.

    • Davidabl2

      I’d guess that it’s because the qs allows you more time to fine tune other parts of your riding skills..
      Athough in another sense I’d agree with you that’s this is a slippery slope first qs&traction control, gps tech etc. and then could come automatic transmissions
      and God-knows what else new-fangled stuff.lie balance control so it’s harder to drop the bike .Eventually it becomes almost like driving a four wheel vehicle :-(

      • artist_formally_known_as_cWj

        Have not automatic transmissions already come?

        • Davidabl2

          It has been offered on a few motorcycles over the last few decades, but has never sold well. Common on scooters and minibkes I believe
          in the form of “CVT” transmissions.

  • Jack Meoph

    Clutchless upshifting is easy, enough. Just get the engine revved to the shift point, load the shifter (put enough pressure on the shifter where it’s just about to engage the next gear), and then roll off the throttle fast and the gear almost goes into place by its self. Clutchless downshifting, not so much. I was at the WSBK races at Laguna back in the day, and went to a clinic by one of the magazines, and the guys there said that yeah, clutchless shifting is doable on the street, but why not just use the clutch? It’s there for a reason. You don’t have to pull the lever all the way back to the grip, but just a little pull and you’re good. I pull the clutch lever almost fully in when I go from first to second (for me that is what works), but after that, I just just tap the lever with each upshift and I haven’t had a problem. Back on point: if I buy a bike that has a quick shifter, cool, but I don’t need those extra 550 milliseconds for how I ride.

    • Braden

      Agreed. I think unless you’re chasing lap times far to the right of the decimal, there isn’t a practical reason for one. For street riding, it essentially becomes a novelty. Still sounds like fun though.

      • Ayabe

        It is a novelty but I’d bet you’d fall in love with it quickly after using it. It’s fun and easy and I don’t think detracts much from the art of motorcycling.

        Now auto rev-matched downshifts….can’t sell me on that.

  • Oddturkout

    675R has quick shifter as standard.

    • Braden

      Thanks for catching that. Some of my research was a little old so I must have missed it.

  • Piglet2010

    On the track, I just preload the shifter on my pre-gen Ninjette, and run the engine into the rev limiter – fast and smooth up-shifts. Going down, I just blip the throttle and push down on the shifter at the same time – smooth as long as it is done above 10K rpm.

    • Justin McClintock

      Hunh….hadn’t thought of that but I guess the rev limiter would act in the exact same fashion and it’s already there. Not a bad idea really, though I wonder if it would translate as well to some of the bigger bikes. In theory it should though.

      • Piglet2010

        You need two things – a bike with a “hard” rev limiter, and decent over-run between peak power and the limit.

        Work on my Honda Deauville too, but usually I do not run it that hard.

  • octodad

    have 5 speed pickup w/ 180k driven. only use clutch (original) in/out of 1st gear. learned this on older VW’s and never had problems. deft use of throttle and brake accomplish it smoothly. recently purchased 2014 CTX 700n ABS/DCT. daddy, can speed shift like a banshee. has push buttons on handlebar. keep the R’s at 4 grand and walk away from bigger, faster bikes. takes them a while to catch up. this season will bump it up a notch so they can checkout my new tail light rig…

  • metalheartmachine

    This is so a cup holder can be mounted on the left bar.