Harley-Davidson Launches New Models

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Harley-Davidson SuperLow 1200T

Keen to take advantage of the start of new riding season, Harley-Davidson has just launched a pair of new models that will become available in dealer showrooms this summer.

After a break of almost five years the Low Rider name returns to the H-D line-up with an all-new Dyna model that features a 103 ci v-twin and some design cues that are unique to this bike.

The Low Rider moniker was first used on a Harley-Davidson motorcycle in 1977 and became synonymous as a bike that you could modify to your own tastes, riding style and more importantly your size so you could achieve the optimum riding position.

Harley-Davidson Dyna

Whilst this 2014 Dyna is not an-all cruiser, it’s essentially a Dyna but with a few tweaks. The Low Rider features a polished headlight visor, wrinkle black trim and split five-spoke aluminum wheels and twin-disc front brakes like its sibling the Fat Bob. There’s also a 2-into-1 exhaust.

But, as it’s a Low Rider, H-D has paid attention to ergonomics and has tried to find the perfect set-up for riders of all sizes for this bike. Therefore, the Low Rider features a two-position seat, an adjustable handlebar riser, which requires a special tool from the dealer to adjust it, and foot pegs that are relocated two inches forward compared to other Dyna models. This effectively gives the bike a seat height of 25.4 inches.

The Sportster line-up has also come under the spotlight for 2014 and there is now a long-distance version of this perennial favorite called the SuperLow 1200T. This the first time that H-D has used the 1200 v-twin in the SuperLow frame and because it’s designed for touring (hence the T in its name) there is a revised suspension, with rear pre-load adjustment, and tire package.

The SuperLow 1200T has been calibrated to appeal to shorter riders (H-D says in particular those from 5’ 1” to 5’ 7”) meaning there is easy reach handlebars and foot controls as well as a low seat height. The 1200T is also equipped with lockable saddlebags, a detachable windscreen and mini footboards.  The rider position three inches forward compared to the Sportster SuperLow 883 model to make it even easier for a rider to get both feet flat on the ground at a stop.

Harley-Davidson has confirmed that the SuperLow 1200T will be priced at $11,799, while the Low Rider will start at $14,199. Both bikes are in dealer showrooms now.

  • Clint Keener

    Do H-D’s have ABS yet? Serious question.

    • Justin McClintock

      Yeah, I think you can get it on any of them.

    • the antagonist

      They’ve offered it on certain models since at least ’07. But last year it became an option on Sportsters too, which, I believe, makes it available across their entire lineup.

    • http://www.themotorcycleobsession.com/ Chris Cope

      ABS is available on all HD bikes. I think in the States you may have to pay for it, but it’s standard in the UK (where it will soon be legally required as standard).

  • Justin McClintock

    I wish they would put the midmounts and dual discs on the Fat Bob and Switchback. Kinda seems a little backwards to mount them on the Low Rider.

    Also, I lament the fact that there isn’t a single Sportster made anymore that isn’t a “low” of some kind. Every last one of them. The “regular” ride height Sportsters have been phased out completely (and have been for a couple years now).

    • mms

      Super super lowwww bikes seem to be the fashion now , at least these are still visible from the side windows of most cars ;) And if you put better shocks on them, they do get a little taller.

    • Dennis Newman

      I think the XR1200 was the only sporty with a reasonable chassis size. I have an ’02 883R that is kinda cramped, but it’s fun.

      • Mark D

        I like the look of the 883r. No nonsense, actual rideable lengths of suspension travel, not excessively heavy. If they want to take on the Bonneville, they need to remake those and sell them for $7k, not those silly Indian water-cooler cynical abominations.

        • Dennis Newman

          My long term goal on my 883 is to keep it below 900cc’s, but outrun the guys with1200 kits. I’m waiting for money and opportunity to align so I can swap in an XB9 engine.

        • Piglet2010

          But you smile and wave to everyone when you ride a Bonnie – so it is nothing H-D could ever make a competitor to.

      • Mykola

        small nitpick that I wanted to point out: the frame is the same across all Sportsters and has been unchanged since 2004. The the difference with the XR1200 (and the late 1200R) is the travel available in the suspension.
        Similar nitpick in the article: same old frame, but the nice thing the 1200T inherits from the 883 Superlow is wheels that you can actually get radial tires for, Hooray!

  • Speedo007

    “Harley” and “new models” in same phrase? strange.

  • NOCHnoch

    “New models”

    Obsolete technology, dated styling (sorry, ‘retro styling’), primitive ergonomics, and trying their best to appeal to their rapidly aging customer base. These are hardley (get it?) new.

    I’m really surprised H-D doesn’t push for mandatory helmet laws in every state. You’d think that they’d want to keep their existing customers alive, since they don’t seem to care about gaining new ones.

    • 200 Fathoms

      Nice one!

      • enzomedici

        I hear you. The big Harleys have ABS now so they are working on it. My Harley Sportster has that old primitive technology though and the best thing is that it never needs valve adjustments and my turn signals auto cancel.

    • Paolo

      Harleys sell themselves. They don’t need to be innovative to make more sales. It’s sad but it’s true. The nostalgia factor is quite strong, specially if you look at the sales figures, Harley owns the cruiser market! I guess their moniker is “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” and so far, it seems to be working for them.

    • dinoSnake

      A joke, right? Or simply uneducated and snobbish?

      I don’t ride a Harley and I personally think they are rather overpriced but, unlike so many self-righteous around here, I keep up with what EVERY manufacturer does and Harley certainly has not been standing still technology-wise. They simply “stand still” on their styling, something that they feel strongly about (for better or worse – I personally wish they would take the Revolution engine and fit it into something more sport-tourerish) but they know what their hard-core, loyal customer base wants. And they want that comfy, laid-back totally retro style but with well integrated but hidden high-tech. Their customers WANT a V-twin engine, of that style and that look, and that’s what they get – Harley has been throwing tech at their V-twin for a good number of years now to update the tech but keep the look.

      If you had really bothered to know anything about the industry you’d find that Harley was one of the first manufacturers to offer ABS across
      most of its line, the first to offer EFI across its entire line AND the new top-line FL’s come with water-cooled heads a la BMW which was introduced last year (hmm, at the same time as BMW!) Etc, etc, etc,

      Linked ABS, throttle-by-wire cruise control, hybrid air & water cooling, hydraulic valve adjustment, 6 speed gearbox, Brembo brakes, EFI, GPS, radio, CB, color touchscreen display, voice recognition Bluetooth, LED headlamp, iPod / USB integration – have you BOTHERED to look at Harley nowadays??! Apparently not.

      • runnermatt

        You make excellent points across the board. I know Harley has been dinged for quality, but the current bikes are far and away better than the ones they made in the 70′s. Then again, everyone else’s bikes are a lot better quality today than they were in the 70′s.

        Despite that I can’t help but wonder what kind of sales Harley would pick up if they started and Adventure touring line or sport bike line. I realize that Buell was the closest Harley ever came to sport bikes and it is a shame that Harley didn’t keep developing them. I expect the decision was partly because the Buell sales number didn’t compare to the Harley numbers and another part possibly that Harley management was scared of what customers would think of Harley making sport bikes or that management believes that is it isn’t a “Harley” (i.e. classical cruiser bike, but specifically a Harley Davidson brand) then it isn’t really a motorcycle.

        • Fava d’Aronne

          Well, the fact that the only “sportyish” model that Harley made, the xr1200x, is not sold anymore in the US partially answers your question. I bought one three years ago heavily discounted, because the dealer had it sitting in the shop for months…

          • Richard Gozinya

            I don’t think Harley really knew how to market the XR1200. And I don’t think the bike really knew what it wanted to be. Was it a souped up Sportster, or a naked sportbike, or a sporty retro? On the latter two categories, it mostly fell short of what other bikes could do, the first category though, only has a small niche. I think part of HD’s problems when trying to compete in more performance oriented categories, is they’re not used to competing. In the cruiser market, they dominate, everybody else follows their lead. Whether it’s the big four, Triumph, or Polaris. They all look to Harley. In anything where handling and speed come into play though, Harley’s got no clue, and doesn’t seem particularly interested in getting one. For now at least, that works for them.

            • artist_formally_known_as_cWj

              You think the Vision follows Harley?

        • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

          Like this? I would be thrilled if harley just adopted those ergos.
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46Kj7NEEBcY

      • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

        Yeah there’s nothing uneducated or snobbish about hating harleys.

        I’ve ridden harleys. I’ve had them in my garage for me to ride and i declined to ever take them out. Why? They’re junk. They’re too loud from the factory. The ergos, the super stiff controls, the vibrations, the seat, the wind. You’re set up to ride it like a sail on a boat, which is not comfortable, and why there are ENORMOUS fairings for them. Every part of a harley is a compensation for a previous ill design. The motorcycle itself has a huge ego, and everything you do on a harley is to make sure the bike doesn’t kill you. I prefer motorcycles where I’m the limiting factor, not the motorcycle.

        I’ve ridden buell’s too, and for what those started as, they’re awesome. But you have to understand how much work goes into making not just a buell, but a good buell. They’re definitely NOT harleys, and harley will definitely never be buell.

        If you learn to ride, you won’t want a harley. It’s that simple.

        • luxlamf

          Too Loud from the factory? They sound like sewing machines from the factory so I don’t know what year you are basing your opinion on here, I have a 2002 HD, got 117,000 mile son it now, is that Not a Quality Product? It was also my 1st bike and I ride manly canyons etc.. here in SoCal and I ride everyday. Not a sail boat, not as nimble as my Triumph Scrambler. SO maybe you should stop comparing bikes from the 70′s and 80′s as you are obviously doing to the new ones they are releasing.

          • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

            “Its not as nimble as my triumph scrambler”

            I think that says it all right there. The scrambler is a bonneville on stilts and the bonneville is simply decent. Ive ridden 30 year old goldwings that handle better than harleys from the 2000′s.

            • Piglet2010

              I have been around both a recent model Street Glide and Road King with stock pipes, and neither seemed particularly loud when ridden normally. The two bikes with stock exhausts that I cannot be around without earplugs (they may be others) are the TW200 and the 1199 Panigale.

              • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                Yeah the panigale apparently got the long muffler of shame in Japan because it was too loud. I have no information how Japan does their testing. As far as harleys go I’ll put it like this: +10 decibels means something’s perceived as being twice as loud. The only numbers i could find were for these: A stock sportster idles at 87 db. A stock CBR1000RR idles at 80 db. The harley is more than one and a half times louder than the CBR.

                • Piglet2010

                  Not sure if it is the cross-over pipe or just more baffling in the cans, but the “touring” H-D’s lack the obnoxious sound of their other models.

        • Richard Gozinya

          I remember reading somewhere that one of the most popular brands for Ducati owners who want a second bike is Harley. Not everything’s as simple as black or white, and while not a big fan of HD myself, I can understand the appeal. Not everybody always wants maximum performance, not that most people who do can utilize their bike’s full potential anyways.

          • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

            That’s right, the brands are popular. Throw BMW up there too since those guys are pretty hardcore. And throw me in with honda owners. But even if live to ride red, or you’re part of the Ducatisti, you’ve gotta be able to look at the facts of the bike and be honest with folks if you think what you’re riding is a piece of garbage.

          • Davidabl2

            From what i’ve seen around these parts the MOST popular is a second Duc. For a track bike, a spare so one’s always running, a customizing project or whatever..

        • jlxn

          “Yeah there’s nothing uneducated or snobbish about hating harleys.”
          Yeah, but there’s something really stupid about it. Seriously, it’s a brand of motorcycle, what’s to hate? Every person I’ve ever met who has gotten their panties in a bunch over motorcycle / car / or any other thing brands have been nothing more than loud mouth numbskulls.

          • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

            “uneducated” would imply ‘not stupid’ or do you mean talking about motorcycles in general is a waste of time? perhaps you’re in the wrong room?

    • Jack Meoph

      I had a Harley, and it was just OK. I rode it cause I was hanging with a friend who rode a Harley, and he sold me his old one cheap. No biggie we had some laughs and a few good times. They are not the type of bike to ride for any other reason except to cruise, or show off to people who are of like mind. My local HD shop also sells Triumph, Kawi, Honda, and Vespa, so I get to see Harleys on a regular basis, and I will say that they are some styling, shiny, low, and heavy pieces of machinery. I also test ride them on a fairly regular basis, and I’m always happy to get off them. They do absolutely nothing for me from what I want and need out of a motorcycle, but obviously they do something for a lot of other folks. The only recent Harley I looked at with any interest was the XR1200, but everything on that bike was heavy, like boat anchor heavy. There wasn’t one piece on that bike that payed any lip service to the “lighter is faster” mantra of motorcycles. It was just a joke, and for the price (unless you got it at close-out) you could get a Ducati that would run circles around it, and look better doing it.
      What was the point, to have a HD logo on the tank? Weird. So buy your Harley and cruise the straights, enjoy yourself and just move over to the right when a faster (that’s would be like everyone) rider comes up on you.

      • Piglet2010

        I like the H-D XR1200 because it makes me feel less bad about how much my Bonnie weighs.

    • Send Margaritas

      One small thing I liked…they come with stainless steel brake lines. Nice to see on a factory bike.

  • Davidabl2

    Mr. Watson.. this seems like a H.-D. press release, “not that there’s anything wrong with that.” As Jerry Seinfeld would say.
    What i’d more like to see (out of curiosity as much as anything else) is a kind of Field guide to the Harley-Davidson. All the “FXD-this vs FxD-that” and”this-wide” vs “that- narrow’ business is kind of confusing to folks who aren’t converts. Especially wondering if there might be any from recent decades that are “diamonds in the rough.”

    • Jack McLovin

      The Fat Bob is pretty good.

      • Davidabl2

        Like Arnold’s in “Terminator,” right ?

        • WheelieGood13

          Not sure if you’re trying to be a smartass or asking a question, I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt. You’re thinking Fat Boy, we’re talking Fat Bob. One is a FLSTF, the other is a FXD. The FLSTF uses a funky swingarm made to give the appearance of a hardtail frame. The FXD uses a standard swingarm frame.

          • Piglet2010

            The Fat Man and Little Boy were cutting edge technology for their time.

            • Michael Howard

              Wow, talk about a blast from the past.

          • Davidabl2

            My mental image of the bike was the view of the bike from the front, with Arnold aboard.

    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      Doesn’t just seem like a press release. It is a press release, accompanied by press release photos and press release words. What’s sad is that HFL would NEVER, not for any brand, just flat out say “hey here’s two brand new bikes” unless there was something actually new about them… not a chromed headlight visor and spoked wheels.

      • Tim Watson

        I think you’re mistaken. We would never cut and paste a press release, but I’m not going to rise to the bait of what you’re inferring. Are the two models new? Yes which is newsworthy for some but maybe not for you. If they were just updated existing models then maybe we’d not bother. I’m not sure how you would expect us to run our own pictures as neither bikes have been built yet for us to photograph.

        • Campisi

          “If they were just updated existing models then maybe we’d not bother.”

          Isn’t that pretty much what they are, though? Both bikes are new trim levels of existing platforms, with engines that have already been in use in other models.

          I suppose this could all be chalked up to semantics. I think of “model” as meaning new and different engineering; whereas others could think of “model” as a certain configuration, whether or not anything used in that configuration is new.

        • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

          It’ll be easier to show you than tell you:

          New for 2014 Harley’s making a BRAND NEW MOTORCYCLE… by taking apart existing models and putting them back together with brand names they haven’t used for a whole five years. You excited yet? Well you should be. Now with Harley’s “perfect ergo” system, you’ll be able to assume the “You’re doing it wrong, Superman” pose (arms AND legs splayed in front of you) with the aid of a factory standard removable booster seat for short people, and foot pegs moved two inches forward from standard. Now, you may be thinking, wait, how is it Harley’s the only brand that continues to move foot pegs forward, while every other bike has them beneath the seat? Well, Harley Davidson doesn’t make motorcycles for Al Qaeda. That’s how.

          • Tim Watson

            Not sure how you managed to combine superman, lesbian, commie (yeah I saw your post before you edited it) and Al Qaeda all in one post about news from Harley-Davidson. But somehow you did. I’m not entirely sure what your point is but thank you, you gave me a good laugh today.

            • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

              No i don’t imagine you know how i combined those terms, or get the point of what i’m saying.

              • Piglet2010

                Either you get Harley-Davidson or you do not.

                N.b. I don’t get H-D, and would rather ride a scooter while wearing a Roadcrafter – oh wait, I do ride a scooter while wearing a Roadcrafter.

          • dinoSnake

            “We know you think a “new motorcycle” means a new frame, a new engine, a
            new suspension, and maybe some new electronics, but new for 2014
            Harley’s shaking up the industry by making a BRAND NEW MOTORCYCLE…
            from their existing motorcycles”

            Oh! You mean just like BMW, Moto Guzzi (until the new 1400 California), Ducati and KTM do?

            Why don’t you, and everyone else here, get off their high horse? Even Honda makes “new” motorcycles from existing parts, or do their recent 700 & 800 ADV’s from the VFR et al not count? Or Suzuki’s V-Strom from their SV’s? How many Ducatis have been spit out from Pantah DNA – can we actually count that high??

            AGAIN, note, I do NOT ride a Harley and I’m not really interested in getting one – for the most part they are not my style (maybe a Street Glide et al). But I have to respect Harley for NOT standing still, contrary to what the self-righteous here want to post. They have been developing their stuff for a number of years now, but you really have to be pay attention to both them and the market to see it (and since most people here apparently only care around sport bikes, rather than keeping up with as much as possible as long as it has 2 wheels, you’ve all missed it).

            • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

              “new suspension,” its not a new suspension. It’s a ‘new for that moniker’ suspension.

              “Oh! You mean just like BMW, Moto Guzzi (until the new 1400 California), Ducati and KTM do?” More like yamaha’s ‘all new’ SR400.

              “Even Honda makes “new” motorcycles from existing parts” We don’t call them new bikes though. We don’t just regurgitate the terminology from the press release. We call it like it is.

            • Jonathan Berndt

              no one would mistake a sandcast CB750 with a CBR1000RR. they share no parts. the CBR1000RR would be considered a “new motorcycle” when compared with the CB, understand?

            • Tom Byrne

              I don’t ride a Harley either and I also like retro styling. I just happen to like cafe style bikes the best (classic American bikes second). I commend Harley for its efforts. I agree with Dino Snake that there is no crime in using some existing components. Not every new vehicle has to be completely new. In fact, Some of the biggest flops were “all new.”

          • Davidabl2

            “super forward controls are the ‘perfect ergs” if you’re 7 ft. tall or so.

      • 200 Fathoms

        Let’s toe the line. Towing the line is too tiring.

      • Dennis Newman

        A Sportster touring model is quite new, even if it’s on an existing chassis. As well as a Low Rider nameplate on the Dyna chassis.

      • http://www.themotorcycleobsession.com/ Chris Cope

        Look at this comments section. Look at the comments section of any website when they mention Harley-Davidson. For some reason, just talking about that brand is crazy pageview bait. If you’re running a website, it makes sense to mention Harleys.

    • Tim Watson

      First off, drop the Mr Watson… it’ s Tim. Secondly you’re correct it is taken from a press release which is how most manufacturers send out information to the media. We’ve used the information without the marketing speak/hype, just the facts, Good suggestion on the name thing as it’s pretty confusing. First stop is go and look at H-D’s web site, you can trawl through each bike by model that will give you a start. Personally, the best of the bunch is the Dyna line-up – but then I am biased.

      • Paolo

        I own a carbed ’05 Dyna Super Glide [FXD]…with 60K miles on the clock…I understand your bias Tim.

      • Piglet2010

        Mr Watson – when will you be reviewing the Super Wet Glide Ultra FXOMGWTFBBQASAPLOL?

        • Kevin

          F*** that business, everybody knows the bundt cake-head FUSOBLMAO Po-Rider was the baddest Harley ever.

        • Davidabl2

          …But that’s probably some sort of what used to be called a “marital aid”

    • Richard Gozinya

      The Super Glide Sport/T-Sport, The XL1200R Roadster, and the VRSCR Street Rod.

      • Davidabl2

        I’ll have to look up the SuperGlide Sport/T-Sport in some sort of field guide, sport in the same sounds “promising” Likewise with the “sportier” Sporties.. V-Rods, I don’t think so. For something modern looking, I think I’d want something better-looking modern-looking. That can have the valves adjusted with the engine IN the frame,please. With the gas tank filler not actually UNDER the airbox…

        • Richard Gozinya

          They’ve actually got a pretty solid following. Most of the bikes on Sons of Anarchy, if I recall, are customized Super Glide Sports, the T-Sport was just a touring version, and when they were selling those bikes, the reviewers, regardless if they were into Harleys or not, all seemed to like them. A cruiser built for handling, so of course the Harley faithful had no use for it.

          • Davidabl2

            The “club’ of folks that ride SOA-look bikes is not a club i want to be part of. In my part of the country it’s all idiots.
            Even our local 1% club doesn’t rock the look…as they aren’t idiots ;-)

            • Piglet2010

              SOA – School of the Americas?

              • Davidabl2

                No, the one with the fictional bad guys, not the real ones. (smiley NOT inserted) TV series that popularized the style of putting bikini fairings on Dynas. AKA SoCal
                ClubStyle I believe,

        • Mykola

          Very simply, the Superglide Sport took the basic H-D cruiser, added fully adjustable suspension, dual-disc brakes, a tach, and blacked it out. the T-Sport added slim bags, a nice seat, and a flyscreen. H-D should bring that back because people are dropping a lot of coin turning their low-and-slow Dynas into those with aftermarket parts.

          • Davidabl2

            Since the MoCo winds up with a lot of that aftermarket coin(don’t they?) then that’d be all good as far as they’re concerned, I’d think.

          • Davidabl2

            “added fully adjustable suspension, dual-disc brakes, a tach, and blacked it out.” All the essentials, then cool. Except mids?
            I’ll have to check that out….

            • Mykola

              mids already came standard on the Super Glide (FXD, and more-or-less the later FXDC); as you might guess, the Super Glide has fallen out of fashion as of late.

              • Davidabl2

                Yeah, I googled some pics. Cool, I don’t do forwards and apes of any sort.

      • WheelieGood13

        I have a Street Rod, it’s not without its quirks, but it’s hands-down the best performing Harley I’ve ever owned (and I’ve owned a lot). They can be picked up on the cheap as is usually the case with any bike H-D puts out that doesn’t cater to its core audience (FXDX, etc). I used just shake my head when I’d see guys pick up the FXDX and immediately remove everything that made it special (suspension, dual disks, etc).

        • Piglet2010

          If H-D combined the best of the Street Rod and the XR1200R, I might consider buying one.

          • Mykola

            oh c’mon, no you wouldn’t.

            • Piglet2010

              Well, if they called it something else and sold it through a different dealer network…

        • Davidabl2

          “I used just shake my head when I’d see guys pick up the FXDX and immediately remove everything that made it special (suspension, dual disks, etc).”
          I’ll keep that in mind..good to know.

      • Justin McClintock

        None of which are built anymore. Go figure.

      • Charles Quinn

        The Roadster and the 883R (also gone) are the only H-Ds I’ve ever seriously considered owning. But they know their customers, and their customers don’t want anything resembling a ‘standard’.

    • Paolo

      A little more info on the “Harley code” mystery…

      http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/harley_models.html

    • Vincent T.

      Here’s a pretty good breakdown of the Sporty sub-models. I’m sure there’s a more inclusive list somewhere: http://silodrome.com/buying-guide-harley-davidson-sportster/

  • Jack McLovin

    Can someone name just one, one part of these bikes that is actually new?

    • WheelieGood13

      Those wheels look new (and fairly sharp by H-D standards).

    • Piglet2010

      They come with the new and improved 2014 Harley-Davidson Lifestyle™.

    • Clint Keener

      They do have a new color, which I think looks pretty rad.

      • Davidabl2

        Same 2.1 gallon tank, without a reserve tank hidden somewhere else on the bike. Hiding another gallon somewhere now THAT would be “pretty rad”
        I’d suggest oil-in-frame system (70′s Triumph style) and make the “oil tank” into a reserve….

      • http://metabomber.com/ Jesse

        I’ll agree. Out of context that would look like “pasty caucasian thigh,” but on the bike it looks alright. I’ll admit that I’m a sucker for muted matte colors on motorcycles.

  • WheelieGood13

    I’m not feeling the lack of lean angle in the Dyna pic, looks sketchy as fuck. The pegs do fold up in theory, but have been known to not fold up in practice. Other than that, the new Dyna looks like a good starting point for a performance (by H-D standards) build.

    • Charles Quinn

      I agree with you, but I’m more concerned that, judging from what we can see in the pic, the rear axle nut seems to be about four inches higher than the swingarm pivot with a rider on board …

  • HoldenL

    Am I misunderstanding something? You have to go to the dealer to get the handlebar riser adjusted?

    • Tim Watson

      I think you can do it yourself with hand tools. Just H-D recommends, of course, that the dealer does it.

  • http://motocynic.wordpress.com/ Scott Otte

    I’m curious what Harley is going to do when the emission laws force them to finally drop the air cooled engines their customers love. Ducati is working their way out of air cooled twins because of this, will Harley have to do the same?

    • bluemoco

      Harley is already water-cooling some of the Big Twin models. There are two ‘Twin Cooled’ engines available for Touring bikes, debuting last fall in MY14 models. (103ci and 110ci)

      • http://motocynic.wordpress.com/ Scott Otte

        Interesting, but will they sell. The last time Harley came out with a Water cooled bike the sales were less than impressive from what I’ve heard.

        • bluemoco

          Yes, the liquid-cooled V-Rod family was introduced in about 2002. It has had limited sales success.

          • jlxn

            I think the V-Rod was targeted to another type of rider, not the traditional HD riders. The style of the new liquid cooled motors don’t deviate much from their Air-Cooled models.

            • bluemoco

              That’s fair – the V-Rod has always been distinctly different from the more traditional Touring/Softail/Dyna/Sportster model families.

              That said, I think there’s a widely-held misconception that Harley has never made liquid-cooled engines before MY14.

  • charlie

    Aren’t there any American manufacturers that make something besides huge cruiser type bikes?

    • Paolo

      EBR makes sportbikes…so there’s that.

      • charlie

        Yea, Erik Buell is awesome but $40k+ is a bit out of my budget

    • Michael Howard

      And there’s Motus: http://motusmotorcycles.com/

  • Michael Love

    Is it just me, or is the only recognizable model of Harley is the sportser. The rest all look the same to me.

    • Piglet2010

      I agree, except for the faired touring bikes.

  • Charles Quinn

    I’ll probably never buy a Harley but it’s nice to see some concessions to practicality outside the Touring range. The 1200T in particular seems like they’ve listened to people who wanted them to “Switchback” a Sportster. But can anyone explain the obsession with catering for shorter riders? Is it women they’re after? Is anyone really intimidated by a seat height higher than 25.4 inches? And what’s the deal about getting both feet on the floor? I almost never do that.

    • Doug Herbert

      The average height of humans is rising, therefore older people are shorter than younger people, and Harley’s biggest customers are older people, therefore they aim for shorter people than a company aiming at younger riders. Additionally, older people have a harder time getting their legs swung over taller bikes. Older riders also struggle with heavier bikes, and the shorter the bike is, the easier it is to handle the weight. The Sportster 1200t is about 600 lbs, and the Dyna Low is about 645 lbs, so still quite heavy. Attracting female riders is probably secondary to all this, but also important.

      • Charles Quinn

        That all makes a warped kind of sense. what would make more sense, rather than increasingly slamming seat height, ground clearance and suspension travel, would be just getting a lighter bike … But even my VN900, which weighs more than a Sportster, has 5.5 in of ground clearance and 4.1 in rear shock travel, so it’s definitely a Harley rather than a cruiser thing.

    • Richard Gozinya

      It’s a styling thing, and sort of self-perpetuating at this point. In the cruiser world, lower is better, or so goes the common wisdom. They’re not aiming at any particular height of riders, especially given how so many of these bikes put the foot controls so far forward.

  • ticticticboom

    OK, this is the final straw. I just removed Rideapart from my bookmarks bar, my favorites list and my reader(s). I once paid for access, now you couldn’t pay me to read this drivel.

    • Davidabl2

      Not even for the ‘entertainment value?”

    • TheBigPill

      Yet you felt the need to announce that. If you want to go…go.

  • John

    Neat. Not a short rider, but more options is good news to me.

  • Campisi

    At the most recent motorcycle show in my city, the Harley booth had a rolling-road arrangement set up in order to bother innocent bystanders even inside a downtown building. I wandered over to investigate.

    Me: “I don’t get it.”

    Scantily-clad Booth Woman: “Don’t get what?”

    Me: “This.”

    Scantily-clad Booth Woman, adjusting her too-tight cotton tee shirt: “What’s not to get?”

    Me: “You tell me.”

    Scant-of-patience Booth Woman: “Please go away, sir.”

    Me: “Do you sell sequined chaps?”

    … I was in need of more coffee.

    • luxlamf

      Ah so another middle aged balding fat guy goes and bothers a woman who is getting paid poorly to do her job. Did you show her photos of you Worn in Aerosticth and other nonsense? Bullying women, very manly. who really is the Pathetic one here? Did you and your Little friends have a good laugh about it in your Stafford collection $99 suits you wear everyday?

      • zedro

        So I take it you are the target audience for irrelevant booth-bikini girls? Standing there lookin’ pretty is like sooooo hard!

        PS, from the tone of Campisi’s post, I got the impression he wore 500$ suits……weird huh?

        • Davidabl2

          Maybe, but I’ve never seen anybody wearing their $500 suit to a motorcycle show.

          • zedro

            True, Aerostitch start at 700$

            • Davidabl2

              Yes, but it’s pretty much a wash once you’ve accessorized that 4500 suit with a couple of dress shirts,a couple of ties and some cufflinks.
              The Aerostitch might actually be cheaper.

              • Davidabl2

                $500 suit, that is

                • Piglet2010

                  But the Aerostich boots will be just starting to break in when the dress shoes are no longer presentable for use.

                • Davidabl2

                  Wel, yes they’re not broken in UNTIL they’re NOT presentable. But you knew that already,didn’t you?
                  Same is true of the “suit’ as well,actually.

      • Campisi

        All wardrobes involved were a bit strange. At most of the booths, Indian and Victory included, the booth representatives all wore some variation of business-casual, albeit with a company logo or two. At the Harley-Davidson display, however, something else entirely was going on; the women all wore tie-tops or tight baby tees with short denim cutoffs and those high-heeled strap sandal affairs nobody in their right mind wears willingly, whilst the men all wore department-store formal business attire.

        Lots of balding hippo-men about, but I found it a touch off-putting. Not a single other woman was there who wasn’t being paid for it.

  • Rameses the 2nd

    I never see HD advertise as crazy as other vendors and yet they outsell all othe manufacturers, at least, in the US. I have a retro style bike (Triumph Twin) and when I bought it I knew I could get a smaller lighter bike for around the same money or less. Not everyone buys a motorcycle to wheelie and go to canyons. If you like HD buy it, if not, there are plenty of other choices, but please stop whining about “how HD is not as nice as your brand/bike” everytime there is a new HD article. Seriously, this is getting a little annoying now.

    • luxlamf

      It’s quite comical now at the INT MC show that Victory, Suzuki etc… all make their reps dress up in the Leather vest with various nonsense all over it and some kind of Winged graphic on it to try and mimic the supposed HD rider and the Bar and Shield etc… but yet you go to the HD area and they wear garage shirts as do Ducati. Triumph (and I own one) is really making a fool out of themselves these days trying to cash in on the HD look and feel while attempting to come from a “We are the ones who made this up” etc… and I now meet quite a few people on Triumphs who are bigger dopes than the HD guys they are constantly bitching abut (as seen here in this comments section) and their cruiser bikes are truly horrid

  • KC

    To be honest, I can’t tell one HD from another, but I’m not interested in owning one either. What caught my eye in the picture was the seating position. It looks more standard than cruiser. So, they moved the seat forward and are using bars with less pullback, and I’m lost beyond that point.

    I’m not knocking HD, I just don’t understand their motorcycles.

  • CanadianBiker

    Boy, nothing brings out the petty small-minded insecurities faster than a Harley article. It must be exhausting, constantly having to shriek about how vastly superior your bike -and therefore you- is. If only anybody really cared.

    • Michael Howard

      I’m a little confused. Are you talking about people who think Harleys are overrated or about the typical Harley rider who refuses to acknowledge any “lesser” bike?

      • Piglet2010

        Yes, in real life 99% of the time it is the Harley-Davidson fans starting in on other people’s bikes being inferior.

      • zedro

        Confusion noted!

        Commencing basking in irony!

    • Davidabl2

      I suspect that due their proud tradition, many people feel that they’re the “only real motorcycles.”
      Even some people who choose to own other motorcycles must secretly feel that way.
      Many Harley riders probably feel insecure because deep down they know that it isn’t true.

    • Clint Keener

      This site started as a sportbike focused blog, and just recently sold out to the cruiser side. Most people here do not understand the Harley “lifestyle”. Hence the friction.

  • Blake Bryce

    At least they are doing more than Victory did with the “Gunner”.

    • Davidabl2

      Explain, please. In general it’d seem to me that they must be “evolving’ their lineup faster than H.-D. ?

      • Blake Bryce

        The Gunner is nothing more than a High Ball or Judge with a different paint scheme and the guy riding it wearing a Bell 500. They call it “an outstanding cruiser motorcycle” because that is what it is. The only thing removed from it and the Judge is the rear seat, and the High Ball is the same set up but has apes. It does have a larger tire, but if that classifies it as a bobber my Fatcat is a bobber. I like Victory over H-D because of their progression in recent years, but they regressed with the Gunner.

        • Davidabl2

          I am sorry to hear this. I think of that Bob Dylan song with the line “he who is not busy being born is busy dying.”
          Victory will die if they just stand still, as they don’t have the enormous fan base that H.-D. does.

  • Davidabl2

    In the eyes of many who’d like to like them(or love them)-but who don’t don’t…what’s wrong with the Milwaukee MoCo is that they’ve gotten fat & lazy.
    That these ARE two “new models” in H.-D. terms just exemplifies that point.

    While I understand that ‘performance” models and models that break the mold have not done well for them, they DO have something called a C.V.O. Division. And
    I’d think that most companies in H.-D.’s market position would use it to make some small production runs of interesting motorcycles. In part out of company pride, and in part to do some actual r&d, and in part to try to initiate some new trends that could be capitalized on later. And by ” capitalized on later” I do mean that they’d try to make sure they’ll have product that’ll appeal to the next generation. Many will say that Buell could have/should been used for just that purpose and I wouldn’t disagree..

    • Michael Howard

      The XR1200 should have been MUCH more like that.

      • Davidabl2

        Hear, Here !! Just about the coolest Harley I ever saw in my life was an XR-750 that had somehow been made street legal (legal for California in the1970′s)