Yamaha SR400: The New Old Model Launch

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2015 Yamaha SR400

Yamaha has announced it will be importing into the U.S., its entry-level street bike – the SR400 – that is based on a 36-year-old design but now incorporates a few modern tweaks.

The 2015 Yamaha SR400, which has until recently been predominantly sold in the Japanese domestic market, is designed as a no frills type of motorcycle.  But it has now been updated to incorporate a front disc brake, with a rear drum, and fuel injection on its 399cc engine and will go on sale in the U.S. However, there is no electric starter just a kick start that features a decompression lever to get the engine going.

2015 Yamaha SR400

This may have a certain appeal for enthusiasts, who may consider the bike a good foundation for customization. Priced at $5990, the SR400 might also find a niche for itself as a good starter bike. Or for those who need a straight forward everyday commuter ride.

2015 Yamaha SR400

The SR400 is equipped with five-speed gearbox, chain drive, regular telescopic front forks and twin hydraulic rear shocks and a center stand. The seat height is a user-friendly 30.9 inches and the bike has a wheelbase of 55.5-inches.

2015 Yamaha SR400

The SR400’s single, air-cooled, two valve engine has a claimed 66 mpg and with its 3.2-gallon fuel tank you should be able to get close to a 200 mile range. Yamaha also says the SR400 weighs in with a wet weight of 384 lbs.

2015 Yamaha SR400

With spoked 18-inch wheels front and rear, the SR400 has a no-nonsense, clean look to it and when it arrives in Yamaha dealer showrooms it will be available in one color only, Grey Metallic.

  • Justin McClintock

    Seems like maybe the price is $1G or so too high for what it is. A Honda 500 costs less. I realize the styles are different, but they’re still competing for a lot of the same buyers. Heck, it’s basically a big TU250X, minus the electric start. That said, I hope it does well, but I have my doubts. A good number of folks will buy them as platforms to customize, but they’re not selling 5,000 of these things a year to folks who are going to want to cut up a new motorcycle. And the lack of electric start is gonna be a hindrance to a lot of people who would otherwise want to use this thing as a daily rider. Especially for the money.

    • Justin McClintock

      And I’m pretty sure the chick in the photos is about 3’7″ tall.

      • das not compute

        LOL

      • Kirk Roy

        I was thinking the same thing. ;)

        I think the bike is cool and could easily see picking up a leftover in a couple years. I’ve never had trouble kickstarting bikes so no problem for me there.

        • Luke

          Yup – a good bike to buy in 4 years. The problem is it’s a terrible price for a new bike like this, so there likely won’t be many to buy in 4 years… And who would pay this much for a bike new just to customize? I’ll stick with my (very similar) TU250 that I picked up for $2700 with less than 500 miles on it…

    • Nathan Haley

      Same – liked it until I saw the price. Hard to justify a near $2,000 price difference as compared with the TU250X. $6,000 could also get you an actual old SR400-like machine in beautiful condition. Maybe they’re thinking it’ll compete with the new Royal Enfield or similar.

      • Justin McClintock

        Sure, it’s larger than the TU, but unless it has significantly better suspension and/or brakes, there’s really not reason it should cost significantly more. They both should have about the same parts count and the tooling for the SR should’ve been paid off somewhere around 1985. Well, except that the TU has electric start!

        • Brock Wilborn

          And no back up kick.

          • Piglet2010

            Neither does my TW200, but it is easy enough to bump start.

            • Brock Wilborn

              Try doing that when your at the bottom of two hills like an old dry creek bed. And the SR has EFI.

              • Piglet2010

                Why would I be in such a place with a dead battery? Batteries almost always die when the bike is parked for some time, and only a fool camps by a dry creek bed. Park at the top of the hill instead.

                There is a reason why so few bikes have kick starters these days. And certainly no reason why a premium should be charged for a bike that is kick start only compared to one with electrical start (Justin McClintock’s original point).

                • Brock Wilborn

                  Who said I was camping??

                • Piglet2010

                  Why else would you park a bike long enough for a battery to run down?

                • Brock Wilborn

                  Your a moron piglet. The battery plates can short. The armature and it’s windings can short or break, brushes fail, starter relay quit working. Do you ride off road?? I bet I have more time in the Tehachapi Mountain range and the Willow Springs, Lancaster/Palmdale area than you have age.

                • Piglet2010

                  And you are just being difficult on purpose, and arguing a tangent while refusing to answer the original question.

                • Matt Tomasi

                  If the battery’s dead you have no fuel, its fuel injection. This bike goes nowhere with a dead battery, it doesn’t matter that you can kick it over if you have no fuel. The kick start on this bike is merely theater

              • Matt Tomasi

                If the battery’s dead you have no fuel, its fuel injection. This bike goes nowhere with a dead battery, it doesn’t matter that you can kick it over if you have no fuel. The kick start on this bike is merely theater.

      • Davidabl2

        I’d imagine that Enfield’s increase in sales in recent years had something to do with Yamaha’s decision to re-introduce the SR in overseas markets.
        Enfield is now a pretty big manufacturer (approximately Harley size numbers are claimed!!) although the vast majority of it’s sales are still in India

        • Jason

          Enfields are selling well but the Bullet 500 is priced at $5000.

      • HammSammich

        Enfield was my immediate thought…if I want a small retro-standard, why wouldn’t I spend $1,000 less on a larger Enfield B5 w/ electric start, and (in my personal opinion) slightly better looks…

      • Piglet2010

        Or for $1,700 more one could get a Bonnie – not much difference in monthly payments.

        • Clint Keener

          I’d rather have a Bonnie. I think i’ve seen some for $6,700, brand new leftovers.

          • Brock Wilborn

            When Triumph went out of business the first time, they just shut the doors and parts got expensive and scarce.

        • Brock Wilborn

          No kick start on the Bonnie.

          • Piglet2010

            Yes, but the Bonnie is fuel injected and fires right up, even with a weak battery. You just need to learn which way to turn the key to remove it (one way is off, the other parking lights).

    • Campisi

      The kickstarter likely takes next to no effort to use. With fuel injection and a compression release, you could probably “kick” start one of these by hand.

      • Tom Byrne

        I have kick-started my T250 by hand. ;)

    • Eric

      but you can get used to kickstarting. My daily ride is a 88 Yamaha xt 600 z, kickstart only. And i do several rides a day with it. It also has the decompression, it works really well once figured out how to do it.

      • Tom Byrne

        I own three bikes which are kick start only. Doesn’t bother me a bit.

      • Ken Lindsay

        I didn’t mind kickstarting either until I sprained my knee. Its not sprained bad enough to ride, but it is bad enough to not want to kick my bike over. That said, I wouldn’t mind such a bike if adding electric start later was an option.

        • Eric

          I understand. To me, the essence of the SR is a mix of light weight, torque and temper of a single and functional old school design. That makes it a good allrounder and a fun bike.
          Here in

    • Tom Byrne

      This is an attempt to attract nostalgia buffs such as myself. However, I agree that it is about $1k too much. I do like it though. I love middleweight bikes and would love a mid-sized platform I could personalize. It would take the burden off of my 75 GT380 and 79 CB400 Hawk. I have a 750 Katana too, but while it is a nice ride it is ugly as sin (damned tea kettle).

    • Thomas Meyers

      Yeah, $1000 overpriced is about right. Which isn’t to say I’m not thrilled that it’s coming to the US market. I kind of like the kickstarter, though surprised they didn’t do the Royal Enfield thing and throw both in. I’m hoping they sell okay though, in the hopes of picking one up used in a few years.

    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      Everybody’s crazy. If you look at inflation it’s only $50 more than it was in 1979.

      • Justin McClintock

        Inflation and its cost in 1979 don’t matter. What matters is the market around it. And relative to the rest of the market, it’s kinda pricey for what it is. Your DR650 comparison highlights that.

        • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

          “For what it is,” to you and me. For what we use motorcycles for, it’s too much for our budget. The price is fair though.

          • Brock Wilborn

            I’m thinking about buying two of them. One for a TT look and one for a Café look. Yahoo Yamaha SR 400 and check out the ‘image results’.

    • Scheffy

      Personally, if I wanted a base for customization I’d just wait for a used W650 to pop up instead of paying well over $6,000 after tax/delivery BS for something I’d immediately void the warranty on. It’d be much cheaper, plus I’d get a motor that’s 60% bigger and doesn’t look like a CPU heatsink.

      • Piglet2010

        Are you in the UK or Europe – the W650 was only sold for one year in the US, and sales were low?

  • Telemachus_1

    Especially in the winter, I wish more motorcycles had a kickstart simply as a backup. Would it really have been so big of a deal to do that with this bike? And no rear disc brakes?

    • E Brown

      The annoying thing is this is fuel injected – the kickstart is useless if the battery is dead, because you can’t run the fuel pump. One thing I like about my ’78 CB400 is I know it’s pretty much going to start, no matter what – that’s important to someone like me with no cars in the mix. It’s part of why other bikes come and go while the Hawk stays.

      I like the retro-classics, but in this case I think someone would be better off spending $1500-$2000 grand on a 70s UJM twin and use the savings to make or keep it nice.

      • Tom Byrne

        +1

      • Piglet2010

        Some MX bikes have fuel-injection and a kick-starter, but no battery.

        • E Brown

          How does that work?

          • Piglet2010

            The fuel pump is powered by the magneto – I think this was first used by Suzuki in 2010.

            • Ken Lindsay

              Suzuki has had battery-less EFI for years on snowmobiles. On the older sleds, the first pull charged the system and the second started the motor. Not sure if it will be similar or not on this bike.

    • Eric

      Half my bikes have had a rear drum, they’re long lasting and simple. Chances are the rear drum will outlast ownership, not just of the new buyer, but the 2nd and 3rd… cheap, simple and works. Disc brakes alone don’t mean their good, give my Kawasaki Versys as example. It’s brakes are complete crap. BMX bicycles have better brakes than it. My old Honda Shadow with a single front disc and rear drum stops much better.

      I dunno who this bike is for, someone looking for nostalgia is either got 50+ years on their clock and have the money/credit to splurge (on something bigger/better). Or kids wanting something retro who are too broke to spend $6K + another grand in dealer fees plus full coverage insurance.

      • Mr.Paynter

        A gran US$ in dealer fees?!?! Do you guys really pay that much? Out here in South Africa I pay just less than US$100 total, that’s madness!

        • Dennis Hightower

          Yes and no …”dealer prep”; freight; “documentation” ; ambiguous ‘dealer fees’ ; tax/title/licensing… some is unavoidable, and as always true, you get what you negotiate.

  • Joseph Zarrella

    A lot of people are going to complain about the cost and the kick start, but to be honest the kickstarter should be easy and it’s only priced about a grand more than a TU250x so…. I love it.

    • Justin McClintock

      It costs $1600 more than the TU250X and should have fewer parts. As I mentioned above, unless the brakes and/or suspension is significantly better, it’s price should be pretty in-line with the TU’s, not 35% more.

      • Davidabl2

        otoh, that qualifies it for Yamaha’s 3.9%/zero down promo financing..and the TU250X doesn’t.

        • Justin McClintock

          If somebody wants to spend an extra 35% to qualify for a slightly lower interest rate, I’ve got a ton of stuff I’d love to sell them.

          • the antagonist

            Might sound silly to you, but for a recent grad just starting out on a tight budget, that could be the deciding factor. No money down, and a low interest rate making the payments about the same for a bigger, more attractive (if not more economical) bike.

            Of course, I can get a better rate than either through my credit union, but a lot of young buyers don’t know that.

            • Joseph Zarrella

              I did a 0 down, 0% financing through Suzuki for my Vstrom.. Free money.

          • Davidabl2

            irony on both our parts..but wait, “the antagonist” is making a valid point.
            The real difference between the SR and the TU (aside from the Tu being cuter) is that the SR is going to be ‘just enough motorcycle’ for more people than the TU.

            • Justin McClintock

              True, all other things being equal (and even overlooking the lack of electric start), I would personally prefer the SR as it has more engine and I personally like the styling a bit better. That said, they’re not equal with the rather significant price difference. Kind of a bummer. My secret dirty hope is that this prompts Suzuki to build a TU400X with the DRZ motor with some fake cooling fins thrown on the cylinder and the radiator tucked away. I realize that would likely never happen, but a guy can dream, right?

              • Tom Byrne

                I was thinking that this morning while looking at a TU250X

              • Piglet2010

                Suzuki should shoe-horn an updated GS500 engine into a TU250X chassis with upgraded brakes, fork, and shocks, and sell if for $6K.

                • Justin McClintock

                  That would DEFINITELY work as well! Wouldn’t have to update it much either, probably just throw FI on it to meet emissions and call it a day.

            • Piglet2010

              A TU250X is enough bike for most uses (says the person who rides longer distances on a Honda Elite 110 and Yammie TW200).

    • Mykola

      In my best imitation of Bruce Brown’s imitation of Malcolm Smith, “That’s really neat”.
      The price is a little strange though, like others have said, there isn’t any reason for this to be priced higher than any of the basic Made-in-Japan 250s that have been in production since forever. Consider the two-cylinder air-cooled Honda Rebel at $4190 or Yamaha Virago 250 (renamed V-star) at $4390

      • Justin McClintock

        Good point on the Virago 250. It should, in theory, cost a good bit more than this (or conversely, this SR400 should cost less than the Virago). The Virago has two cylinders AND electric start. In other words, far more parts. Parts = manufacturing expense.

    • Mykola

      a mild 400cc mill *with* compression release, there’s no excuse not to be able to kick it over.

      • the antagonist

        My only concern with the kickstart is that this bike is aimed at new riders. I stalled out more than a few times when I was learning to ride (still do every now and then). I can only imagine that if as a new rider I had to kickstart the engine to get it going again, as opposed to simply pressing a button, while cars are honking and whizzing past, it would be a bit daunting, and in some situations hazardous.

        That, and these days there’s just no excuse *not* to have an electric start. Even dirtbikes are coming with them.

        Still, not really a deal-breaker IMO, just kind of baffling.

  • Davidabl2

    I wonder if this is going create upward pressure OR downward pressure on “vintage” SR prices?

  • the antagonist

    The price is way too high for what you get. This bike should be cheap; the R&D and tooling has long since been paid off. If they slashed the price down to around $4500, Yamaha could sell a ton of these. Alternatively, keep it at $6k, but give us our money’s worth. Bump it up to 500cc (should be easy since it started out that way), give it electric start, and ABS – I’d pay 6k for that.

    As it is, I think it will sell well its first year, maybe two, to older nostalgic buyers and younger hipsters who will immediately “cafe” it. But after that initial niche is filled, sales will stagnate unless they cut the cost or offer more value. Which is a shame. This bike has the potential to be Yamaha’s new Bonneville or Monster (or SV650), a timeless design that can sell well year after year, bringing in constant revenue, gaining market share, and building brand loyalty.

    • Tom Byrne

      I would rather save a grand than add ABS and electric start. I could do without either or both. It would make a good looking cafe’. I don’t understand the dislike of cafe’s, hipsters (or any style for that matter). It is like accents. We all believe it is the other guy who speaks with an accent. We all have an accent. Riders who prefer the latest bike and equipment are a segment which is no worse or better than the cruisers, café-hipsters, etc. I have a sport bike and three vintage bikes. Two are crosses between a cafe’ and a 70s superbike in appearance and by T250 is set up like a scrambler. I ride with a leather jacket with an American flag on the back, a new full-face helmet and reinforced riding jeans (not skinny)? Besides old and ugly, within which group do I fall? Answer: None, I am just me.
      I tend to like UJMs without plastic so the SR400 and TU250X appeal to me. Make a 600 or 650 versions and I would be in love. Then again, my dream bike is an old GS650 with an air-cooled GSXR 650 and engine. Weird, huh?

  • MichaelEhrgott

    Any idea on the power it makes?

    • MichaelEhrgott

      Nevermind. It makes 23 BHP.

  • http://metabomber.com/ Jesse

    Unleash the Bratstyle builds!

  • MichaelEhrgott

    That seems awfully heavy for what it is.

  • HoldenL

    Looove those fenders. And 150cc more than a TU250X.

  • juliansr

    “New” riders is probably a misnomer to some degree, I see this appealing to my Dad/Father in law and the odd hip$ter. They want the vintage feel and looks. They want to raise their leg like a pissing dog and wallop the thing to life in front of their cafe acquaintances. It’s about style more than pure performance rider logic understands and 1000$ either way is probably not a barrier.

    Performance is a non-issue but they do need to be able to cruise on the highway occasionally and these days the old guys …they’re a little heavy for a 250.

    Regarding price…let’s see/ride it first. The Cb1100 is nothing to write home about on paper, but in the real world is a fantastic bike with amazing finish and a lifetime build quality. I see these sr400 as a similar revival quality of process for Yamaha and the UJM in general, hopefully the whole thing is high quality enough to keep these little bikes on the roads 20 years until the next round of chop/cafe culture remembers them all over again.

  • appliance5000

    sometimes less is less.

    • Robotribe

      To further your point, “sometimes less is less… and costs more than it should”.

  • Campisi

    These aren’t dirt-cheap, and they aren’t hugely dynamic. That said, they’re cheap enough, and speeding tickets cost a week of New-Economy-Job wages. A bike that builds like Lego, costs nothing to run, and is fun within legal limits is perfect for buyers with no money.

    More to the point, a large sector of first-time buyers new to motorcycling in general don’t see the appeal in current market offerings. The general public (in the United States) has had a complete disconnect from motorcycling for a couple decades or more; a wave of low-income youths seeking authenticity and novelty are approaching motorcycles with virgin perceptions, and neither appreciate nor desire the hyper-specialised lineups manufacturers have been relying on for so long now. Bikes like these feed into the general rebirth of a stagnant and dying motorcycling culture choking on tassels and helmet mohawks.

  • Mattin11225

    Two things that make me happy:
    1) This bike being offered in the US market
    B) ALL THE CAR ARTICLES ARE GONE YOU GUYS!

  • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

    I lold at the title.

  • Paul Cypert

    I love the looks (even more so the Scrambler version that went up on Exif), but as many others have said better, it’s simply too highly priced for what you get. Yes it’s not trying to be modern, in fact it exists bc of the demand to not be modern. Great, I welcome any non transformer looking bike. But just because it’s based on the looks of a 30 year old bike doesn’t mean we should have 30 year old performance. You can keep things simple AND bring modern performance advances to the table OR drop some money off this thing.

    So far only the CB1100 brings the vintage looks and ABS and will be getting my money when I go back stateside. I’d really prefer to buy something lighter/lower powered but nothing else has entered the market at this range (or I’ll get the 500F and work on making it into a street scrambler of some type).

    To me as is now they shot this in the foot before it even got out of the gate. Then later they’ll look back and say why don’t these bikes sell in the US? People always claim to want them then they don’t buy them. Yes we do want them, but don’t get lazy with “retro” and don’t get greedy because it’s trending. This should be a 4500 dollar bike tops or it should pack in some modern driving improvements and keep the current price. 1k more for Bonnie or half a grand less for a 500F…both no brainers over this which is sad bc I’ve been enjoying it from afar for a while.

  • KC

    A Royal Enfield costs less, has an electric start, and a larger, newer, engine. I wanted an SR or SRX – way back. I’m not sure I’d find kick starting a big single all that exciting these days. This is a beautiful motorcycle, though.

    • Davidabl2

      Newer engine..actually that’s an interesting question. Designed more recently, anyway. But not anywhere near state of the art.

  • John

    Are they freaking serious?!? $6000??? Why would they even do that? I wouldn’t pay $3000 for something like that.

  • Tom Byrne

    I don’t need a bike with ABS, or rear disc or even electric start. I like bikes that don’t look like transformers and have a ton of plastic. I like the feeling of flying a biplane rather than a jet. Then again, I like building bikes better than riding them. Nothing special about owning a bike anyone can buy at a dealer

  • roma258

    If nothing else, the Royal Enfield vs. SR400 comparison test should be interesting. But yeah, I just don’t get the price.

  • Dennis Newman

    Well done Yamaha. I will look forward to buying a used one in 5 years…

    • Davidabl2

      Or one that’s languished on a dealer’s show floor for a couple of years….

  • Alex

    Basically…
    Nice bike, slightly overpriced.

  • http://www.themotorcycleobsession.com/ Chris Cope

    I like how they got the tiniest woman in the world to ride that bike in the promo photos.

  • http://www.themotorcycleobsession.com/ Chris Cope

    Also, I agree with what everyone else is saying about the price. Over here in Britain the SR400 has been available for a while and is equally overpriced. Especially when Yamaha describes the bike as an “ideal basis for an easy customization.” Which, of course, means spending more money. It feels as if Yamaha’s market research consisted of nothing more than watching a glut of Vimeo motorcycle videos and thinking: “These guys have money to burn. They would totally pay twice the price. Cha-ching!”

    What’s frustrating is that I like the look/style/concept and would want something like this if it didn’t cost more than a Honda CB500F, which is an infinitely superior bike (in terms of technology and performance). My fear is that no one will buy the SR400 and that will falsely communicate to Yamaha and other OEMs that no one wants that type of bike. We do want it (or, at least, I do), but not at that price.

  • Fava d’Aronne

    This looks nice. BUT what I would really buy in a heartbeat would be a Suzuki VanVan 125, if they sold them here in the US. Perfect city bike, fun, and normal-sized, unlike the Honda Grom. Suzuki, do you hear me?

    • Piglet2010

      The Yamaha TW200 uses the same tire sizes as the Van Van, and has just enough power for 2-lane highways.

      • Fava d’Aronne

        True, but it just doesn’t do it for me…but I understand my statement is based on absolutely nothing…

        • Piglet2010

          I wonder if Suzuki could make the engine from the DR200SE or TU250X fit in the Van Van chassis, as it would make it a better fit for the US market where there is not any licensing advantage in most states to the 125cc engine (Illinois and…? being exceptions)?

          http://www.motorcyclenews.com/upload/217834/images/van_van.jpg

          • Fava d’Aronne

            Look at this cutie…I love it.

            • Piglet2010

              With a bigger engine (18-20 HP at the back wheel), the Van Van would make an excellent rural highway and farm-to-market road (often gravel or graded dirt) bike as well.

          • Justin McClintock

            Wow…that is a good lookin’ bike!

            • Piglet2010

              Scrambler meets monkey-bike (n.b. I like the Van Van).

  • Luke

    The TU250 has a couple of advantages on this bike besides the lower price. On the business side, the TU used in most MSF courses – which is a steady stream of sales (and probably why the TU isn’t even cheaper). There is no way a Kickstart only 400 will have that baseline of sales. The TU is also readily available as a used bike – so no “dealer prep” on top of the price. I would love if my TU had 5-10 more mph to play with on the highway though…

  • Vincent T.

    How are you not gonna show a picture of the TT trim package??

    • Clint Keener

      I can’t find that on their site? Is that the scrambler looking one?

      • Vincent T.

        brrappp

      • E Brown

        It’s not on their site because Yamaha doesn’t sell it – that’s an early custom making the rounds on the internet. And if $6k is too much for the stock bike, $12k for this one will not go over well…

  • worship_mud

    i love my sr. great bike. easy to modify, parts widely available, good and strong online commnity worldwide… this one is a thrown away opportunity as it is far too expensive.

    • http://metabomber.com/ Jesse

      Purposeful looking bike you’ve got there. Nicely done.

      • worship_mud

        thanks! :D i use her as my adventure bike to explore the hills around here… and i’ll use this opportunity to shamelessly post another picture! :D

  • artist_formally_known_as_cWj

    Hm…

    Can anyone give some legitimate insight into what the dealer cost is on one of these?

    Sure, it might be a poor man’s Bonnie, but it also could be a mid-20th century man’s CB500F.

    Even with all the chrome and spoked wheels, it’s hard to see this at $5990 without at least a rear disc.

    I’ll give Yam the benefit of the doubt of having done some market research….or maybe the place is to aim high at the start and discount early.

    Either way: good looking bike with seemingly nice size for larger beginners.

    (smurf in pictures, notwithstanding)

    • Piglet2010

      Most motorcycles typically have a 30-35% mark-up, out of which has to come dealer assembly and the financial cost to the dealer of the money to buy the bike at wholesale (by contrast, accessories and gear usually are marked up about 100%). This assumes no manufacturer to dealer rebates, which are sometimes used to clear out inventory of slow selling models.

  • Campisi

    Her cliche Black Leather Jacket fits rather poorly.

  • Davidabl2

    Paul Cypert wrote:”1k more for Bonnie or half a grand less for a 500F…” I’d say it’s game over right there. Too bad. In the USA,they’ll sell in about the same numbers as the Royal Enfield does.

  • AE Holton

    Saw the bike (in person) at Daytona Bike Week this past weekend. Cool little bike. My wife really likes it. It’s a shame about the $6K buy-in. Would be a nice little addition to the garage at $4995.

  • bigdogbite

    Is that the fuel pump hanging off the lower front left side? Looks very vulnerable. It is interesting, the micro rider in the pictures. Why not show a 6′, 210 lb, age 55 male rider since the greatest appeal of a model of this sort will the old dudes nostalgic for an retro looking new kick start town bike to tool around on. At least it’s available and not another ‘transformers’ looking plasti-rocket.

  • Brock Wilborn

    For those of u that ride around town a TU250X is nice. But where I go there are no cell towers and some places no way to push start. Yahoo this bike and look at the TT. Very nice. I have already found an Asian company that sells a battery eliminator. This bike is perfect for a 65 year young luddite.

  • veeru

    Yamaha u reves evryone heart so wen its launch date in india and the price s quite expensive

  • veeru

    Can u plz tel me wen s da date it gonna launch in India YAMAHA also try to fool people