How To: Choose New Tires

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How To: Choose New Tires

So your bike is ready for new tires. What do you do now? What if you just want the original tire or a similar tire from another brand? Hopefully I can help you make a more educated decision by learning to decipher a tire company’s rating language.

[Cover Photo By: Kevin Tong]

Every tire has a set of numbers and letters that denote size and tire capability. Sizes are identified most often in a set of three numbers. The first number is the section width, this is a measurement in millimeters of what the manufacturer says the total width from sidewall to sidewall of their tire is on a specific sized rim. Use another size rim and the section width will be different. This is not the tread width and it does not include any letters or other adornments on the side of the tires. So a 150 sized tire is 150 mm section width on the proper sized rim.

The next set of numbers is called the aspect ratio or section height.  This is generally a two digit number and represents the tires sidewall height as a percentage of the section width. A 150 mm section width, with a 50 for the aspect ratio, will have a sidewall that is 75 mm tall as measured from the bead to the tread surface. This is again affected by the rim width. Placing it on a wider rim results in a shorter measurement because the tire gets spread out and made flatter.

Between the aspect ratio and rim size is the speed rating. Indicated by a letter designation ranging from M to ZR it indicates the maximum safe speed that tire is designed to perform. The higher the letters the faster it is designed to go safely.

The last two digits indicate the rim size the tire was designed to fit.

Let’s now talk about the UTQG rating. What’s that you ask? This is the “standard” for describing a tires capability. I placed the word “standard” in quotes because it’s an industry standard but one interpreted by each manufacturer. In other words you cannot compare a Michelin to a Dunlop based on this rating. You can compare tires from the same company, so it’s not entirely useless.

UTQG stands for Uniform Tire Quality Grade. It’s a multi part rating that gives a rating for tread wear, traction, and temperature. The higher the designation in each category the better the tire will perform in those conditions. Tread wear is shown as three digit number. The higher the number the longer the tire will last. For example a tire with a 150 rating should last 1.5 times longer than a 100 rated tire. Take this with a grain of salt, it’s a manufacturer’s extrapolated calculation based on limited wear in testing. Useful for deciding between tires from the same brand but again not helpful comparing two different brands. Go by the manufacturers tread life warranty and use that to compare competitors. Traction is either a single or double letter rating, AA is the highest. This is a rating of the tires ability to stop on wet pavement in the mandated Government test. It does not include cornering as a criteria. Finally is the temperature rating. There are three ratings for temperature, A, B, or C. A is the best, meaning it not only resists heat better but also dissipates heat better.

Bridgestone-BW-501

Now that we have covered what the labels mean let’s talk about wading through all of that and finding the tire you need. The first thing to look at is who made the original equipment tire for your bike. This will make it easier to compare tires and get the characteristics you want. For this discussion I will use my personal bike and go through the tire selection process. My bike, Tiger Explorer 1200, came with a Metzler Tourance EXP sizes 110/80/19 front and 150/70/17 rear. If I want to get tires that perform similarly to what I have, but a different brand, I need to look at several factors. Overall tire diameter, tire profile, and tread. Tire diameter is the distance from tread to tread when measured directly across the tire. The best place to find this is a tire retailer or manufacturer’s website. Not every manufacturer lists this measurement so it can be hard to discover (Metzler in fact does not have this information available). I found two tires that fit my needs, Dunlop’s Trailmax TR91 is 26.02 inches tall, and the Bridgestone BW501 in the same size is 26.06 inches in diameter. Not a lot of difference in the case of the front tires so how do the rear tires compare? The Dunlop is 25.13 inches and the Bridgestone is 25.43 inches. Here we have a difference of over a quarter inch in diameter despite both of these tires appearing to have similar tire profiles. This minor difference in tire diameter results in a different ride height in the rear, changing handling characteristics and may require a suspension change in order to return it to a setting you like. These are all things to keep in mind when that new tire doesn’t feel the same as the old one. It also explains why some people prefer certain brands on a bike versus others. Their riding style suits that tire with their settings, in most cases a small adjustment to their suspension could give them a very similar feel.

There are even more factors when you decide you need to change your riding from 100% street to mixed riding, more race oriented tires, colder weather, the list goes on.

Tell us what your tire buying experience has been. What did you you ended up choosing?

  • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

    actually i took that photo.

    • zion

      Another example of being held down by The Man!

    • William Connor

      They updated the credit! Excellent photo as well.

  • Jim Slane

    I use continental motion tires on my 01 katana. I’ve found that not only are they decently priced but they last much longer then Michelin pilot tires. They have a slightly taller sidewall which I like on the rough streets in New Orleans

    • Dennis Newman

      I love the Motion. I have a free Pirelli Angel, so my next set will be those. I get tires at cost, so I try all the varieties I can.

      • Piglet2010

        I put Pirelli Angel ST tires on my Honda Deauville just so I could make bad puns. And my local dealer had them for $140 less than the Pilot Road tires.

  • Jack McLovin

    Thanks for this copy paste job.
    Here’s a million dollar idea: test riding tires. On the TL1000R for example the difference in handling between a BT016 or a Diablo Corsa and a Pilot Power for example is immense. And you don’t know what you have till you’re stuck with it for the next 3-5K miles maybe a lot more. Journos’ opinions are subjective and as an example for an older bike also non-existent. I remember I was so happy after fitting the Pilot Powers on the tiller I was singing show tunes in my helmet while riding it. Actually it was Michael Jackson songs. But then again Pilot Road 2′s were such garbage on the ole ZZR I hated them instantly but was stuck with them because they showed no signs of wear after 7K miles.
    Go ahead, tell me how hard it is to do that and how impractical an idea that is. That’s why you’re poor; coz you think poor ;-)

    • William Connor

      That’s actually my point. Thank you. It’s impossible to test every bike with every combination of tire. If you look for a tire with the same dimensions as a starting point, you are more likely to find one that handles the similarly versus just picking your favorite tire and trying to force it on every bike. You are always brash and loud, but there is always something very useful in what you post.

      • Jack McLovin

        I’m not sure how I can be loud over the internet especially since you can’t see the color of my Hawaiian t-shirt. I can see a tire demo day set up by the big manufacturers where they have popular bikes with a range of tires or to stretch things to the extreme, they actually mount the tires on your bike. Whatever, I’m talking out the side of my neck. My point is you only know which journo was right AFTER you bought that bike or those tires. Also people on the internet are wrong 110% of the time. When I swapped the front and rear suspension on my SV I did a lot of unnecessary things because of guys on the internet talking like they know what’s what based on something they read somewhere.

        • William Connor

          I agree you can’t take a journalists or anyone’s internet opinion on what the best tire is. I am not trying to convince someone to buy a particular tire or brand. What I did attempt to do is give people the research tools needed to find the tire for them and point out some major issues with just reading the numbers listed on the side of a tire.

          It would be pretty awesome to be able to sample tires like you mentioned.

          • Jack McLovin

            Tires are a religion to some people. Polygamous cult compound in Utah and silica compound in tires, coincidence? I think not.
            I wonder if there is even a way to test tires objectively and what kind of bearing that will have on subjective opinions. If on some machine it was established that the Q3 is by far and away the stickiest tire, then you gave it to ten people to test vs. the immediate competition. Would all ten come to the same conclusion (even knowing the objective stats going in)?
            I have bought one tire over another just because of the tread design. Behind the scenes many different manufacturers are a conglomerate anyways or get their supplies from the same people. It’s a weird and complex issue LET’S GET SOME CLICKS PEOPLE! CONTROVERSY :-)

  • Campisi

    One does themselves a service researching tyre selection for bikes they are considering purchasing. The possibility of using radial tyres helped swing the deal on my V7 Stone, but later I discovered that bizarre wheel sizing and clearance issues have me rolling on cross-plys anyway.

    • Stuki

      As of current, I don’t believe there exist oem sized replacement tires at all, for the CB1100……. The 1190 Adventure R is also an issue, not for lack of tires in the right size, but of tires designed for the kind of weight, power and usage that bike was meant for. Being square, straight, narrow and like everyone else may be boring, but it does pay off as far as MC tires go. 17/17 for sports, 17/17 or 19/17 for sport/adv touring, and 21/18 for dirt does make tire choices infinitely less compromised, no matter if aesthetic or theoretical concerns dictate otherwise.

      • Piglet2010

        You would think with all the Kawasaki EX250s out there, someone would make a decent radial sport tire for it, but no. :(

  • Jack Meoph

    I buy “cheap” tires. Those tires are designated by price. They will usually fit my rims and they are made of rubber. Sometimes they are shipped to my house for free. I put them on my motorcycle when the tires I presently have on now start showing the steel cords.

    • Ayabe

      Can’t believe you’re really riding on that or anything close to that.

    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      the sides are still good. just stay off the middle.

    • Mbust

      Amazing. Do you notice the lack of traction when they are so worn out? When I used to live in Texas and just after NAFTA was signed, Mexican trucks started coming across the border with dangerously worn out tires like yours (I think they corrected that now). We were often concerned that accidents would follow them. I would never think of riding a motorcycle with tires like this one. You must notice the difference, don’t you?

    • Stuki

      You need to move somewhere where there are some turns in the road :). No wonder “darksiding” is gaining such traction in parts of the country, if that’s how their tires wear.

    • Jack Meoph

      The snark meter must be broken. Anywho, that tire was an anomaly. I woke up and wanted to go riding. I already had the replacement tire, but hadn’t set up an appointment to get it put on. I looked at the tread and thought…..yeah, one more time around the loop (95 miles). BUT, if any of you are familiar with Pirelli’s, you know that once they get down, they go off quick. Here is the tire that I just replaced. This is what the majority of my tires look like when I replace them, and I live on the central CA coast and there is nothing but twisties all around. I’m not sure what you’re missing, but most of the time the left side of your tire is worn more than the right because in ‘merica, the roads open sooner on left handers, therefore you can get on the gas sooner. I can’t see where any of you think that tire is squared off.

      Also, my town is on fire so it took me a bit to respond. AND, I went for a ride and saw this at the local MC shop OMG!!!
      AND AND strangely enough I saw this in a parking lot yesterday, stunning.

    • DL_in_DEN

      Some of us need to recalibrate our sarcasm detectors, methinks.

  • ChiMagic

    Was this article really necessary?

    • Jack McLovin

      Look man, we’re all counting down the days till the CBR300/R3/FJ-09/899 EVO/Street Triple 875/the next Hayabusa/the Honda MotoGP replica/(insert surprise here) get introduced, and they got to make their bread to afford their grass fed butter in the meanwhile.
      Some people may not have known that the tredwear ratings can only be compared within the one manufacturer’s product line and not across different brands. That’s somewhat useful.

      • Squabbles

        Are we?

  • Dennis Newman

    While the idea of measurement matching is nice, what about explaining things like going from a 170/60 to a 180/55 rear tire? Turn in profile? Sidewall stiffness? Mutiple compound tires? I think these are much bigger factors than overall diameter. Nothing replaces experience and trying different tires on the same bike. Maybe sharing that information would be more helpful.
    Granted a conversation about tires will be as debated as a conversation about oil…

    • William Connor

      The profiles of tires are a lot of what changes the tires overall diameter. Some brands have a very rounded profile and some have a flat profile. So the sidewall height may be the same but the overall diameter of the tire would be different. Thats why I start with the diameter so I am looking at similar tires.

      • Dennis Newman

        I wish tires weren’t so subjective. Even info like what you have given is still just enough to make someone even more confused… You do give people a good starting point. There’s just so much more info that will have much more dramatic effect on tire choice.

        • William Connor

          It’s at least a starting point. So many people ask me where to start so that’s what this is. A starting point.

          • Dennis Newman

            I can get behind that. The article sort of reads like a be all end all. Keep it up!

            • William Connor

              That’s why I listed a lot of possible other variables at the end. Certainly didn’t mean to make it seem that way. Thanks for the feedback!

  • mjc_iv

    “The Dunlop is 25.13 inches and the Bridgestone is 25.43 inches. Here we have a difference of over a quarter inch…may require a suspension change in order to return it to a setting you like.”

    A .30″ difference in tire diameter yields a .15″ (roughly 5/32″) difference in ride height. For comparison, a typical street bike will lose about 7/32″ in ride height over the life of its tires (~9/32″ tread new, with a wear bar at 2/32″).

    So, honest question: are people really adjusting their suspension to compensate for such small changes in tire diameter?

    Also, I’m approaching the wear bars on a bike (’13 CBR250R) that was originally fitted with bias-ply tires. Is switching to radials a bad idea? Good idea? Neither?

    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      Ride height affects geometry. Not suspension. The odds of noticing a 1/8th inch height difference in the rear axle is unlikely. Your bias tires probably deform more than 1/8 in on the freeway. Bias for tourers. Radials for sport bikes. The CBR250R is a sport bike.

      • William Connor

        You can’t just rely on the numbers on the sidewall, you need to check the actual dimensions. Dunlop’s Q3 is a difference of just over half an inch from a 180/55 to a 190/55, however Bridgestone’s 180/55 is in between these two meaning it’s less of a jump from the 180 Bridgestone to the 190 Dunlop minimizing the difference in height while still giving you the wider profile. This assumes the rim is wide enough and doesn’t deform the tire changing it’s dimensions due to squish. If a tire is a larger diameter it will always be larger on the same size rim, whether it deforms, or the tread wears. That geometry change could require a suspensions adjustment, I know these items affect me when I make changes which is why I shared what I have learned not only on my own but from others.

        • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

          people dont upgrade to a 190 for a wider profile. They do it for a taller tire that raises the rear and gives a quicker turn-in because it changes the geometry of the bike. Not all 190′s are larger than 180′s. A 190/50 will squat the back down from a previous 180/55. You wont know what the circumference of a tire is until its on your wheel.

          And geometry change like this has almost no affect on suspension. Going from a 180/55 to a 190/55 is about the same as dropping the triples on the forks by a couple millimeters, shifting weight forward, but barely. Its such a small difference, you cannot dial the change out of the front forks because they don’t offer a minute enough level of adjustability.

          The only reason why you’d adjust the rear shock is for track use, if you need to bring the swingarm back into position while you’re on the edge of your tires so you dont get something called “geometrical tears.”

          • William Connor

            Honestly I could not have made my point any better than you just did with this post.

            Not all 190s are larger than 180s is exactly what I was talking about when checking the manufacturers dimensions to compare tires. Getting a 190 tire that is the same height as a 180 would not be very helpful if you were looking for a taller tire. Dimensionally speaking however a 190 is wider than a 180 since that is the section width and not a height value.

            The difference in diameter shifts the weight forward, if a rider does not like that they need to make adjustments to compensate. IE lower the rear ride height to shift that weight bias back to the rear. This minor change will change the weight on the suspension if the rider is moved forward or places more weight over the forks. See my next comment below as to why.

            I do disagree with the sag statement. Sag needs to be set on any bike to get the most travel out of the suspension for a given weight of the rider. If sag is too soft the shock will bottom out easily and too hard it will not absorb the bumps, it also means that if you set rebound and compression they will be less effective because you won’t be using the shocks normal travel. Settings for the track are certainly different than the street but there are some really good articles discussing setting the sag for both. Here is a great article on setting the static sag http://www.sportrider.com/suspension-tuning-guide-dialing-it

            • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

              Will, we’re not talking about setting sag, we’re talking about adjusting sag between tire changes on the street to compensate for a minuscule difference in circumference.

              I’m pointing out the difference in 180/55 and 190/55 because you’re asserting that there’s a significant difference in equal sized tires, which is incorrect.

              It’s also incorrect to be telling people they can adjust their geometry through suspension adjustments. I mean, they can. Just like they can adjust geometry by letting air out of their tires. Letting the rear tire go flat will also redistribute the weight to the rear.

              • William Connor

                I believe we will continue to disagree on this. I never once mention adjusting geometry, I did say your suspension may require an adjustment to return it to a setting you like. If the tire changes significantly enough for a rider to feel a difference then they would want to make suspension adjustments to compensate, or possibly not, but it is something worth thinking about when someone gets a new tire and doesn’t like the way it feels even though it’s exactly the same “size” tire. I also think half an inch is a significant amount.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Your suspension hasn’t changed dude. Ergos might have changed. Geometry might have changed. Hardness of the tire and cornering characteristics might have changed….. Suspension hasn’t.

                • William Connor

                  I did not say it did change. I said you may want to make changes to compensate for the difference in the tire or return it to a setting you like. I can see where you took the statement “return it to a setting you like” to mean I was implying the suspension setting changed. My fault for poor wording. I also said a taller tire may change handling as well.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  SMH….. not at all. I’m telling you that it virtually HASNT changed, so there’s no need to mess wih it. If you’re messing with your suspension on your street bike after changing tires you’re compensating for a problem elsewhere by messing with the part that’s not broken.

                • William Connor

                  So we agree to disagree. I will continue to optimize my suspension for new tires, and worn tires, and larger tires, or smaller tires.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  There is no suspension adjustment for worn tires.

                • William Connor

                  My advice was to make adjustments if a rider feels like a new tire is not performing like the old one. I’m sorry if somehow that’s offensive to you. I personally make adjustments to my suspension for all of the above conditions because the bike changes. There is no magic setting that never changes for a motorcycle. If advising a rider to look at details besides just the number on the side of a tire bothers you I apologize.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Im not offended when someone’s wrong. I can draw you diagrams explaining why you are if you need them.

                • William Connor

                  I just don’t quite get you at this point. Your so hung up on geometry versus suspension settings that you missed the point of the article. You are attacking people, name calling, and swearing. Yet you then question the credibility of RideApart and myself?

                  It seems we both agree that 1/4 inch of ride height makes a difference. I say that difference may be felt by the rider and they may want to make changes to the suspension to compensate. If the word I used was geometry would this discussion be taking place? Is geometry included as part of the suspension system discussion of a motorcycle?

                  As far as an article on adjustments for tire wear: As tires wear they change, what they once did well they stop doing. They break down, the tire profile flattens out or squares off and no longer absorb bumps as well or maybe they do it better etc. Sometimes a change to rebound or compression dampening can improve or offset this. There are manufacturer setting changes for carrying extra weight as well that adjusts preload, and rebound for my bike listed in the manual. For dirt you want a softer more compliant setup than on asphalt as another example.

                  If people do the research I suggested and find tires that are close in diameter then this issue is moot as the size will be the same. Any adjustments will be based on tire construction and how the rider feels the bike is performing. At the end of the day suspension, like tires, is very personal to the rider. If a rider believes that half turn of the rebound screw did something, then it did. It increased their confidence in the bike.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Youre absolutely more polite than i am but you still dont understand the difference between geometry and suspension. Yes they affect one another, just like tire pressure potentially can affect geometry and suspension, but theyre not the same.

                  I dont want to be the guy that told you so, so if you want you can gear it from the best around,
                  http://youtu.be/RRWzQ5mtftA

                  Other issues i wish i could find someone talking about so you didnt hear it from me are as follows:

                  1. Looking up the diameter of a tire is hopeless because it will be different on everybody’s bike. Just because two bikes have the same tire rating doesnt mean the wheel width is going to be the same, so unless the wheel dimensions are given with the diameter of the tire, its no good. Its probably still no good even if the given dimensions match your wheels.

                  2. A 1/4 inch difference in diameter is a 1/8 inch difference in how high the rear axle is off the ground, but that still is not the same as ride height.

                  3. Ride height will change on a bike depending on a number of things. If you shift the weight forward on a bike you are unloading the rear shock, which lengthens the shock, pitching the bike forward and the seat up. Youre also lowering the front, pitching the seat up. A 1/8″ difference in tire radius wont make any noticible difference to geometry or suspension.

                  3. Tires dont absorb shocks from the road. Yes, theyre pliable and will flatten out under load, but thats not whats absorbing bumps. Your suspension is, or its supposed to.

                  4. Theoretically a used tire will have more flex than a new tire, not less, because the tread is thinner, but between the carcass and the sidewall there shouldnt be any difference in flex from a worn tire at all. If there is that tire is usually past the wear bars and is done. Especially from a stiff sidewalled tire. Then again ive never had a soft sidewalled tire gradually give out over its lifespan either. Pirellis are all soft sidewalls and are praised for their responsiveness and grip way after the tread is gone.

                  5. You could be compensating for a lot of other things when you adjust the suspension over the lifespan of a tire. Ambient temperature will not only affect tire pressure but fork oil temperature which will affect stiction. Fork oil also degrades over time and loses stiction.

                  So im not arguing with your entire article. The first half is just explaining what 120/70-17 means. The second half gets into this weird idea of looking up diameters of tires that are the same size like thats somehow accurate or even useful, and you claim if people dont do that they might have to adjust their suspension. But see, that wont cause you to adjust your suspension. But its a good idea to adjust your suspension regularly anyway because of all these other things like seasonal temp changes and fork fluid degradation. Nor does equal diameter equate to the same feel on the road because you have sidewall stiffness, compound differences and tire brands that wear completely differently.

                • William Connor

                  Don’t apologize for arguing, it’s a very handy thing to have good discussions. The information we covered is highly useful. Just trying to keep it more positive and professional. We obviously see things differently. As I mention tire diameter is important, I did not mean for it to seem as the end all be all.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Well in that case im sorry for answering questions factually.

                • William Connor

                  Thanks for the apology I appreciate it.

                  I did not apply car buying to motorcycles. I have sold both and do know the difference.

                • Piglet2010

                  “…but you still dont understand the difference between geometry and
                  suspension. Yes they affect one another, just like tire pressure
                  potentially can affect geometry and suspension, but theyre not the same.”

                  No, you are making a arbitrary definition of what suspension adjustment is so as to try to “score points” in an argument.

                  If we have a bike with an adjustable swing-arm pivot point, making a change in where that point is changes the SUSPENSION GEOMETRY and ADJUSTS how the suspension functions. Therefore, by logic and commonly agreed upon definitions of the English language (American, Australian, Canadian, British, etc.), is is a SUSPENSION ADJUSTMENT.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Piglet, you sir are in no way going to be deferred by the fact that “suspension adjustment” only refers to your forks and rear shock. So by all means, talk keep talking like an idiot.

                • Piglet2010

                  “I just don’t quite get you at this point. Your so hung up on geometry
                  versus suspension settings that you missed the point of the article. You
                  are attacking people, name calling, and swearing. Yet you then question
                  the credibility of RideApart and myself?”

                  Someone has the emotional need to be the Big Fish in the Little Pond, and to have all others acknowledge him as The Expert on the subject.

                • Piglet2010

                  Semantics – is shimming a shock or moving the fork position in the triple-clamps a suspension adjustment, a geometry adjustment, or both? The answer is, it depends on how you define the terms. Limiting “suspension adjustment” to preload and damping changes is an arbitrary definition which is fine if everyone agrees on it before the discussion starts. Using limited definitions to score points in an argument is juvenile.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Shimming a rear shock is a geometrical adjustment. Preload, compression, and rebound would be suspension adjustments. Even you can follow the differences between geometry and suspension: if you arent adjusting the suspension, you arent adjusting the suspension.

                • Piglet2010

                  The engineers that design suspension systems would disagree with your definition. But hey, if it provides you a chance to toss out an insult… :D

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Uh no Troll, they dont. They would smack you in the head with a physics book and it would magically open to the page explaining what motorcycle geometry is.

                • Piglet2010

                  You have ego issues. Funny thing is, those who are really accomplished in their fields never seem to need to build their own egos by attacking others.

                  Every hear an engineer say, “I am working on a geometry system for a car/truck/motorcycle”? I think not.

                  Of course, if you can post citations to the peer reviewed and published papers you have written on motorcycle suspension design, I will shut up. You know, technical journals, not blog posts.

                • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

                  Trololololololol

                • Piglet2010

                  Now you hurt my feelings.

                  Bwahahahahaha!

          • Davidabl2

            KR you could/should write for the magazine..

    • William Connor

      No not for this little change in height, however there are much larger differences in the same size tires than the one illustrated. Simply making a point that you need to pay attention to the overall diameter as it could affect this. Same thing happens with car tires. One brands size 205 fits in a wheel well, another brands 205 does not.

  • Squabbles

    I need expert advice on helping me choose a new D-606 for my dualsport. I’ve tried and tossed lugs from nearly every single other knobby available and even shred them off D-606′s occasionally.
    Any input on new 606′s would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

    • William Connor

      Not sure what exactly you are asking. The D606 is a very aggressive tire, are you looking to replace it with something else or additional information about the D606?

      • Squabbles

        I’m an aggressive rider so it to the 606′s advantage to be as well. I’ve tried every other tire available to fit my bike other than street tread, I’ve absolutely no use for a tire without knobs.

        Should they be mounted from the left side or right side and should I consult a professional about mounting? In the past I’ve always just winged it and hoped everything worked out. I’m no professional but I have been selecting and mounting tires to the same bike since the ’80s. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks. I’ll take my answer off air.

        • William Connor

          Just to follow up: I called Dunlop to ask. I am waiting to hear back on this.

  • Piglet2010

    So one side gets to be insulting and have a say in an argument, but the responses are deleted? You just lost another reader. RIP HFL.