What’s New In Scooters 2014

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What's New In Scooters 2014

Scooters can be a cost effective, fuel efficient way to travel, whether you’re commuting to work or just cruising around town. 2014 offers a handful of new, diverse choices, with motor sizes from 50 cc to 700 cc, bringing up the total number of scooters on sale in the U.S. from 49 to 53 models.

Aprilia SR MotardAprilia SR Motard - $1999

Displacement: 49 cc

The SR Motard is the newest supermoto-inspired scooter from Italian manufacturer Aprilia. After a long wait, the SR Motard finally makes its North American debut, but it’s essentially the same model as the second generation Piaggio Typhoon.

Honda ForzaHonda Forza - $5599

Displacement: 279 cc

The Forza offers lots of user-friendly power, reaching speeds of almost 100 mph, and is legal for highway use. The under-seat storage is large enough for two full-face helmets or a bunch of groceries.

Kymco MyRoad 700iKymco MyRoad 700i - $9699

Displacement: 699.5 cc

The MyRoad 700i is a larger capacity touring scooter with a full size windscreen. It’s a bit heavy at 608 lbs, but its longer wheelbase makes for a comfortable highway ride.

Piaggio Fly 150Piaggio Fly 150 - $2999

Displacement: 150 cc

The Fly 150 is a mid-size offering, with its 3-valve, low emissions engine that can achieve up to 144 mpg. There are only two colors to choose from, black and white, but its unassuming style makes it a nice choice for urban riders.

Suzuki Burgman 200 ABSSuzuki Burgman 200 ABS - $4999

Displacement: 200 cc

The Burgman 200 ABS is also a mid-sized entry based on engine size, but it has design cues from the maxi category. The Burgman features anti-lock brakes, as indicated by its name, and is Suzuki’s smallest offering ever in America.

Vespa 946Vespa 946 - $9946

Displacement: 125 cc

The 946 is Vespa’s newest ultra premium mid-size scooter, which is also being offered in hand-made limited edition trims. It sports plenty of technology (ABS, traction control, fuel injection), but these features don’t come cheap with an MSRP of $9,946.

Yamaha Zuma 50FXYamaha Zuma 50FX - $2590

Displacement: 50 cc

The Zuma 50FX drops the bug eye headlights of the current Zuma model and adopts the Asian market single headlight design while adding colored rims, grips and stripes to position itself as a sportier offering.

There’s something for everyone in this list of new models for 2014. Which one peaks your interest the most?

  • Dan Sheldon

    I currently commute on my Suzuki V-Strom 1000, and the wife enjoys riding pillion on weekend trips so I’ve been looking into a scooter for her in-town travel; this list is great as it shows the variety of styles and price-points for this year’s releases! Thanks!

    • Mark D

      My GF also enjoyed riding pillion on my Ninja, and became jealous of my ability to get to any point in the city in 15 minutes, and always find parking. We went to check out bikes, but she really liked scooters; as she wasn’t going on long road trips, and had never used a manual transmission, it made sense! We checked out a lot of the scoots above, and she wound up buying a Kymco Like 200i. Its vespa-styled, with slightly larger wheels (more stable) and engine (165cc v. 150), it’s fuel-injected, and comes with a built in top case. I think she got it out the door with a helmet, gloves, and jacket (close to $500 total) for $3,000. I steal it all the time now, and I can’t recommend them enough!

      http://www.motorcycledaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/100609middle1.JPG

  • Michael Howard

    The practicality of scooters cannot be overstated. Convenient operation and integrated storage that allows you to ride instead of taking a cage is one of the reasons scooters are so popular in almost every part of the world. The ONLY reason I own a car is because I live in an area with snowy and icy winters.

  • Benjamin Reynolds

    I feel like you almost have to consider the Honda Grom if your thinking about getting a scooter. Similar MPG, weight, and size, but with the fun of the a real motorcycle.

    • Ryan Kiefer

      I see your point, but I think that those who buy a small city scooter are looking for those characteristics that separate the scooter from the motorcycle, like the simplicity of the CVT, the step-through design, ridiculously high mpg, and built-in weatherproof storage.

      Plus, the look. Nothing looks like a Vespa but a Vespa.

      • Benjamin Reynolds

        The under seat storage is really the only thing the scooter has going for it. The four speed on the Grom is better than the CVT as it prepares you to one day buy a big bike, the Grom gets over 100 MPGs, and it looks more attractive (says my girlfriend).

        The only one on this list that would be more practical than the Grom is the Fly 150. The bigger scoots are not so good on gas.

        • Ryan Kiefer

          Ahh, but you’re assuming that the one-day goal of a scooter rider is to upgrade to a full bike. That is not necessarily the case.

          I concur on the maxi scoots, which is why I specified small city scoots. I’d rather have just about any other 500-700cc motorcycle than a maxi scoot.

        • tobykeller

          Don’t underestimate the step-thru area for cargo hauling. I’ve made many a post office run on my Scoopy that would have required a bunch of bungees and time had I taken the Versys.

          In Asia, it’s a no brainer, too, since a 110cc fi Honda scoot can be had for around half the price of a Grom. In the US, it costs even more than that for a wheezy 50cc.

          • Benjamin Reynolds

            I think if I was in the market for a scoot I would good with the PCX150. It’s probably my second favorite looking scooter besides the Ruckus, not to mention it goes 70mph while maintaining that 100 MPG.

            • JohnnyWaffles

              Same here and it gets up and goes pretty good too. Great seat for pillion use, under seat storage and fits my 6’4″ self pretty well.

          • JohnnyWaffles

            Absolutely. I’ve had all kinds of bags when shopping on a scooter…12 pack of beer fits there too, depending on the scoot.

        • Doug Erickson

          who buys a scooter looking to “upgrade to a big bike someday”? a scooter is its own thing, and they make perfect sense for city livin’.

          • Sportbike Mike

            I did. It is nice learning to ride without having to shift. I still have the scoot too. It has its advantages. I just can’t daily the 150 to work. My commute is mostly highway now.

          • ThruTheDunes

            Interestingly enough, I was up at the BMW/ Triumph dealer one day, and there was a guy trading in his big boxer GS for two of the BMW touring scooters, one for his wife and one for himself. He commented that he had been riding for 40 (?) years, was retiring, his wife wanted to drive too, and he was tired of shifting. While not my cup of tea, it sure was making him happy. To him, I suppose he was trading up to a scooter!

    • Jack Meoph

      The Grom has nothing for storage, it’s a toy. My scooter (Genuine Buddy 50cc Italia) has a small front storage area, a hook to place plastic bags on, underseat storage, and I have a top box. I can go grocery shopping with my scoot, and I do. The practicality of scooters can not be overstated. They are amazing urban personal transportation, and there are now a lot of solid choices out there. Stay away from the Chinese junk. Buy Euro, Japanese, Taiwanese, or Korean. I’m waiting for the Indians (the other kind) to bring their goods over. They supposedly have some quality scoots.

      • Benjamin Reynolds

        While it’s not as good as a scooter in the storage department you can get accessory storage gear no problem. I take my FZ6 to the grocery store all the time and have no problem buying a weeks worth of groceries and hauling them home in my 30L tail bag.

        • choerenz

          I have a Vespa LX 150 with the top case and get about 3 grocery bags worth of food stored no problem. I recently bought a Honda CB500X and added a Givi 55l top case which also lets me carry about 3 bags worth of groceries. On either bike I particularly enjoy the challenge of doing a heavy shop knowing I will have to pack carefully to get it all home.

      • mjc_iv

        That Vespa 946 is also a storage-less toy, at triple the price. Pretty though.

  • E Brown

    I had no idea a scooter could run $10k! Okay, some of those funky BMW ones, but, you know, that’s BMW…

  • Waldo Lost

    I have a SYM HD200 with 35000km, all problem free miles! When and if it quits, I will get myself another. Ease of use, weather protection and FUN are what scooters are all about…

  • Disqusdmnj

    I’ve got a Honda PCX150, with a Givi top box and windscreen, and Nelson-Rigg side bags – looks just like the Forza, only it’s about a foot shorter in length. Even fully loaded, I’m over 90 mpg – hard to argue with that when running errands around town or commuting to work. Having just gotten my endorsement last July after taking the MSF course, a scooter is a great first bike to learn what riding a bike is actually all about, save the manual clutch. I’d have gone for the Forza, stepping up to their ABS version at $6,000 I think, but my garage couldn’t fit it… and by the time it does – after I can get rid of all the toys and crap my son won’t use in a few years – I may just jump right to a motorcycle. But it’s beyond me why a Vespa is so pricey!

    • Benjamin Reynolds

      The PCX150 would be my choice if I was in the market.

      • Disqusdmnj

        It’s the first “bike” I’ve ever owned that I didn’t have to pedal, and I’ve even taken it on a couple motorcycle group rides, as long as there isn’t any highway riding – it’s barely 300 pounds soaking wet, and easily buffeted by a strong wind or a passing vehicle. But it can well hold its own at 60-65 mph with the windscreen. The 2014 version has a digital dash and a much larger tank… ~100 mpg is great, but that’s about the limit of the tank, plus maybe another 20-30 miles in reserve. That’s why I carry an MSR fuel bottle, just in case.

  • Theodore P Smart

    The Vespa 946 is sold out. If you didn’t put a deposit on one you aren’t getting one.

    • Jack Meoph

      They still have one at the local Ducati shop, which also sells Vespas. I so want that scoot, but it’s just not in the cards, or the bank account.

    • HoldenL

      Too bad, because that thing is stunning.

      • the antagonist

        That’s the first and only scooter I’ve seen that inspired true, unadulterated, lust. If I had the funds, I’d surely get one for mysel…er, my wife, yeah that’s it, for my wife. (I’ll just ride it all the time to make sure everything is in good working order.)

  • Vincent T.

    Almost $10k for a Kymco scooter?!? I feel like I’m taking crazy pills…

  • http://blog.duder.net Stephen Wuebker

    There’s also the new Stella Automatic. The only scooter out there giving you real vintage style with modern conveniences like a CVT and a factory warranty.

    • Jack Meoph

      Local shop is selling 2013′s for $2,600 (I’m sure tax and doc etc will add to the OTD), that’s a killer price. I think the Stella’s are made in India, and the Buddy’s are made by PGO in Taiwan. Stella’s are nice. If I wasn’t so obsessed with owning a Vespa, I’d have no problem buying one. Maybe I should walk in with $$$$$$ and ask for the ULTIMATE OTD!!!! They also have one with a sidecar, freaking sweet looking.
      http://santabarbara.craigslist.org/mcd/4427246189.html

      • http://blog.duder.net Stephen Wuebker

        Stella is made in India by LML who bought Piaggio’s factory and tooling for the P-series Vespas of 70′s and 80′s. They are essentially the same scooter. Basically. When they were first introduced. 4-stroke engines made things different, and the new autos are even more different, but most parts and accessories from 70′s and 80′s P-series should fit on a modern Stella. $2600 for a new bike from a dealer is a steal!

  • CaptainPlatypus

    Interest rates peak. Interest is piqued.

    • Clint Keener

      Nice!

    • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

      piked*

      • LS650

        The interest rates hit you in the head with a pike?

        • http://krtong.com/ Kr Tong

          pickled*

          • Michael Howard

            I don’t want a pickle…

  • LS650

    Scooters – fun to ride, until your friends find out.

  • Mr.Paynter

    I dig the Zuma for getting around, but on aesthetics and head-turning points, the 946 is it!

    We have the 110cc Zuma here, it’s called a BWS, and still has the bug-eyes! I’d love one, and nearly got one but opted for my TW200 instead.
    A friend of mine rode his from Pretoria to Cape Town (roughly 1000miles) over a week, taking the long-way round.

  • http://hunty.tumblr.com Steve Hunt

    Can’t believe you missed this bad boy out Andrew (admittedly I’m biased):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWSVeeLKYWk&list=PLzNfXgKU0drl2b0V-wf8f2k5-TxsVuW9-

  • Doug Erickson

    no mention of the primavera? the sprint? the hooligan 170i? the updated pcx 150?

  • Brian Reynolds

    Listen, don’t get me wrong, I love scoots too. I’ve owned 3 Vespas previously: one 200 – didn’t like the handling, and two preferential 150s with imho better feel and response than the 200 for around town riding. Anyhow, in terms of pure ubran transport, I don’t know if it gets any better than a 100-150 scoot. I have to say two things, however, about these “new” scoots so to speak. First, other than pure Goldwing levels of comfort, I can’t imagine why anyone would want a large scooter. A motorcycle of the same size will brake better, will handle better, will accelerate faster out of a situation, and yes, even get about the same gas mileage as scoots 300 or larger don’t return economy benefits better than a bike, some bikes better than those scoots even. Second, 10 grand for a scooter!!!??? Are you kidding me?

    • Michael Howard

      I’ve owned a 400cc Yamaha Majesty for almost six years (my previous bike was a K100RS BMW). I had absolutely no intention of buying a “maxi-scooter” but, as I searched for a mid-sized touring bike that would be convenient around town yet still be capable of long-distance road trips in comfort, I quickly discovered that a “maxi-scooter” was ideal for what I needed. I can carry the equivalent of two full-faced helmets beneath the saddle and two more in my removable 55-liter Givi tail trunk. That’s more than an f’n Gold Wing. And it cost me less than $7K brand new.