Honda 2015 New Models

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Honda 2015 New Models

Honda’s big bikes have been getting a lot of attention lately, with the introduction of the Gold Wing Valkyrie and CTX1300. Now Big Red turns its gaze upon motocross, ATV and a new CBR entry to further hone the lineup for 2015.

2015 Honda CBR300R

The big news for street riders is the new CBR300R, which will replace the CBR250R in the lineup. The little CBR was feeling the heat from Kawasaki’s Ninja 300, which has gained a following among new riders and experienced riders looking for an affordable, fun track day bike. With a 17% power increase over the outgoing 250 model, the new CBR300R should attract a wider range of riders with a starting price of $4,399 ($4,899 with ABS). Available late summer 2014 — get on a list now.

2015 Honda CRF450R

Motocross enthusiasts get updated CRF450R and CRF250R machine, both incorporating a range of engine changes and race-derived improvements. Pricing has not yet been announced for the CRF450R; the CRF250R will start at $7,599. Both bikes are expected to hit dealerships in the fall of 2014.

2015 Honda CRF250R

Another race-tuned bike returning for 2015 is the CRF150R/CRF150RB-Expert, both of which are designed for “serious amateurs.” We’re talking tons of travel front and rear, a high-output 149cc liquid-cooled four-stroke engine and a race-proven chassis. For less-serious amateurs looking for some fun, the CRF230F comes with the old electric leg and a great middle range size — bigger than the 150s, but not as overwhelming as the 450s — just perfect for fun and adventure. For off-road riders who are still learning the ropes, the CRF150F is a real bike with an easy-to-manage powertrain and moderate weight — just the ticket for a safe, non-intimidating introduction to the world of motorcycling. And rounding out the motocross portfolio is the CRF125F/CRF125F Big Wheel, both of which are designed to fit a wide range of riders from big to small, experienced to beginner. We’ll have to wait to see how much each of these bikes cost, but they should be in dealerships by late summer/early fall 2014.

2015 Honda Rincon

Capping off the new is the 2015 Honda Rincon, a luxury class ATV with a 675cc engine, automatic transmission and independent suspension on all four wheels. Sophisticated features like electronic fuel injection, a hydraulic torque converter and four-wheel disc brakes make the Rincon into a unique entry in the four-wheel ATV world. Look out for the Rincon in summer 2014. Prices will be announced soon.

Can Honda continue to put out new and revised product at this pace? Let’s hope so — it’s been an exhilarating ride so far.

  • srghyc

    LOVE the simple, yellow on matte graphics of that 300R. Almost looks like hi-viz.

  • Justin McClintock

    Would really love to see Honda bring back a two-stroke woods bike.

    • Vincent T.

      I like your style

  • Tupack Shackur

    Love the look of the 300R. Wonder why more manufacturers don’t do the rim tape look, can’t be expensive, and it really makes it pop.

  • Theodore P Smart

    No Africa Twin… Beginning to wonder if it really exists.

    • MichaelEhrgott

      Me too.

  • ChainGang

    How about using the twin 500cc from the 500x in a modern dual sport??

    • RumbleStrips

      I would buy that in a second. Honestly, I’m just hoping they take the engine from the new 300R and put it in a new CRF300L to the replace the 250. With just a little more power that would be a really great bike.

  • JT

    Have Honda motorcycles and the term “Glacial change” always been associated?

  • Dan

    What’s the actual claimed power output on the 300? Interested to see how it stacks up against the Kawasaki, since the 250 Honda had a (relatively) huge power deficit. I think that 300cc spec-class racing at the club level will be amazing in coming years, with a host of models available or coming soon: kawasaki, yamaha, honda, bmw (maybe), triumph (maybe).

    • Brett Lewis

      I wonder too, but the wet weight is 27 lbs lighter and the MSRP is $900 lighter than the Ninja, according to the respective websites.

      • Dan

        Thanks for the info. The 250 honda had a considerable weight advantage over the Kawi too, but the weight and handling advantage weren’t usually enough to overcome the power deficit — so Kawi’s tended to dominate the 250 grids.

        The Kawi 300 offers a lot of equipment for a learner machine (abs, slipper clutch, etc.), but the price — and weight — has grown accordingly. As a road and learner bike, I think the honda is probably the clear winner. But on track I think it’s tough for the single-cylinder configuration to compete. KTM is an exception here — the RC390 single puts out as much power as the Honda 500 twin — but that’s a different class of bike anyway.

        • Brett Lewis

          I poked around and most sites are saying 30.4 Hp and 19.9ft-lbs. I believe that’s a few less hp and a couple more ft-lbs, guessing the peak torque is at a lower rpm than the Kawi too. I suppose the Kawi is still the better track bike.

    • Brett Lewis

      I wonder too, but the wet weight is 27 lbs lighter and the MSRP is $900 lighter than the Ninja, according to the respective websites.

    • chad west

      I think it will be like ninja 250 vs cbr250 , ninja higher speed and revs and cbr more torque with its single .triumph better change their 250 to a 300 if they wanna keep up with everybody and you left out ktm with their rc390 (if it ever comes to America)

  • atvman29

    Rincon?? Its been essentially unchanged since its initial launch over a decade ago… What about the actually new Pioneer 500??

    • Justin McClintock

      Side-by-side. Drive Apart will probably address that.

      • atvman29

        Why? Its essentially an ATV with 2 seats and a steering wheel… I don’t get how it would be more applicable to Drive Apart than it would Ride Apart. To be honest I don’t think ATVs fit in on either site unless they start adding a lot more ATV coverage on Ride Apart!
        I was mainly more curious as to why adding a second spark plug to the Rincon makes it all new for 2015? It was introduced in 2003 with minimal changes since then. It’s literally (except for maybe the current Recon) the most dated ATV model Honda sells.

        • Justin McClintock

          I don’t know why the ATV would be here at all either, honestly. But as for the side-by-side….it’s a lot closer to being a mini-car than it is a motorcycle. You drive it, you don’t ride it.

  • Ayabe

    Cripes just spend the extra $1600 and get the 500R – it’s way more motorcyle and still learner friendly. If you can’t handle one of those then you shouldn’t be riding, first bike or not. Honda should have killed the 250 and tried to find a way to knock $500 off the 500′s.

    Perhaps my disdain for the Ninja 300 is coming through – the value isn’t there, even coming in a few hundred cheaper I think that holds true of the 300R as well.

    Prior to 2013 and the new 500′s….sure maybe, but it’s a new market now.

    • Jack Meoph

      That $1500, once the extra tax, doc, setup, and destination fees are added can easily go over $2K. While that may not seem like that much money to you or I (God knows I enjoy flinging cash out of my car while driving by the peasants), that is a pretty hefty chunk of change for people just starting out in life and just starting to learn to ride.

      • Nemosufu Namecheck

        What he said

    • CaptainPlatypus

      As Jack points out, $1500 is quite a lot of cash for some of us. In fact, if insurance totals my bike instead of fixing it up for me, that’s about what my replacement budget will be. It’s easy to turn this one around – if a 300cc twin that can easily bust 90mph two-up isn’t enough bike for you, you shouldn’t be riding. At least not on public roads.

    • Justin McClintock

      I do, on some level, understand what you’re saying about the 300 vs. the 500. I just don’t understand a 300cc one-lung in something with pretensions of being a sportbike. That being said, the Ninja 300 is a whole different animal that will likely STILL walk all over the little Honda, displacement increases be damned. The performance gap between the Ninja 300 and the 500cc Hondas really isn’t as big as the displacement disparity would suggest.

      • Damian

        Take a look at the specs of Yamaha’s new R25 250cc twin. I’d take one of those over a Ninja 300, CBR300 or 500. The 14,000rpm redlining R25 has been dyno’d at 31rwhp which if it were a 600cc twin translates to 75rwhp. Compare that to the CBR500 with 47hp at the crank; which would equate to a <60rwhp 600cc twin.

        • Justin McClintock

          Who cares what it would translate to as a 500 though? It’s not a 500. So it’s still down 15 hp on the CBR500….which BTW could easily make more horsepower but was built to a European licensing class so it can’t….unless they want to limit its potential market. The other question would, of course, be the cost of the machines. I know nothing of the R25. Can I even buy it in the US? If so, how much? And what’s it weigh? Because if it ends up being the same price and weight range as a CBR500 (I know, I doubt the weight is gonna be similar, but who knows), then where would the advantage be?

          • Damian

            There’s quite a few folks outside of the US that don’t buy in to the idea that higher engine displacement is a must have at any cost. A2 licencing laws or not the CBR500R is a bloated, overweight, underpowered mâchine but still sells in the US. Why? Because it isn’t a 250 (FFS). Oh, I own a Daytona 675 and CBR250R.

            • Justin McClintock

              Some people want versatility in their first bike. A 500 (and its greater power) offer that. Plain and simple. I’m not about to buy one. But I at least see that point of view. If I was buying a first bike and thought I might wanna do some distance riding or commute more than 5 miles on the interstate, I’d shy away from a 250 as well. As for horsepower…they may be in the same ballpark. But how about torque? Because feeling like you have to wind the bike out ALL THE TIME gets old, particularly if it’s a person’s only bike. I fully appreciate the small displacement bikes (I have a DRZ400SM and a DT175), but I wouldn’t want to ride one across that state (I have a SV1000S for that). I don’t see why a new rider would either.

              • Damian

                Ok fair points made Justin. Last year though, I did ride 600 miles on my 250 to attend a family wedding. The route involved some of New Zealand’s finest, twistiest backroads and the little bike was sublime through the corners partly because of its entry speed. The bike also performed admirably when I rode it at CSS level 1 and 2 earlier this year so my I contend that 250′s can be so much more than the often labelled ‘beginner 1st bike/ short distance commuter bike’. Yes, there are better suited, more expensive, higher insurance, higher maintenance cost, higher powered alternatives…

                • Justin McClintock

                  I get that. But do you honestly think you’d be as enamored with the 250 if you didn’t have the Daytona as well? That’s really the crux of my point I guess. I love a small bike, like my DT for example. But if it were my only bike, I’d get tired of it VERY quickly. New riders are no different.

                • KC

                  The CBR250R is a surprisingly competent motorcycle for the right rider on the right roads. I downsized to one recently because I was tired of the bulk and weight of my larger motorcycle in the city. (The mpg and range weren’t great either, less so in city riding.) I’m also on “compact” side of the size spectrum and hardly a novice rider. I’ve done effortless, comfortable, 200 mile days on it, too. When you’re riding a small motorcycle, you have to think and work a bit more to get the most out of the power.

                  Like all Hondas but their highest end sports models, it’s a bit too heavy and it’s tuned a bit too mild. Their styling is a matter of taste, ranging from generic, to conservative, to cartoonish. Plastic design is not their strength. I do like their engineering, though.

                  The CBR300R will do well for the right riders and in the right market – but they have done more exciting and competent small displacement motorcycles in the past.

          • Damian

            Btw, it’s not down by 15hp because the 500′s 47 is measured at the crank unlike the R25′s 32hp measured at the wheel. So more like 10. My guess top speed between the R25 and cbr500 would be very close.

    • BobasBounty

      As the writer pointed out, there is also a market for second bikes. I’d love to have a BMW GS as a commuter/tourer and a CBR250R (soon to be 300) to sate my sport bike fun with friends on the weekend.

      Also, there’s a $1,900 difference between the two without ABS. That’s like 45% more… Which is very significant in this price range. Not to mention it would cost about $15 a month to insure this thing. Either way, there is definitely a market for riders new and old in this space. If there weren’t, every company in the world wouldn’t be clamoring to make them. Heck BMW is getting into it soon. You know that’s a ripe market when a company that makes mostly liter+ bikes dives in on 300s.

    • mike

      If your serious about small displacement sport bikes why not just go thought the trouble and get a JDM Bike like NC35 or MC28 Honda. There are probably enough floating around now days that it is not that hard to find one.

    • Stuki

      The 300r is supposed to be 75 lbs lighter than the 500. That’s a fair bit of weight, particularly for smaller riders. Now, what about an even cheaper, and lighter, 300 SuMo?

      • Justin McClintock

        Depends on what price they can bring it in at. Though Honda has put that engine in a Sumo as a 250, so I see no reason why a 300 couldn’t be done. They just need to avoid WRX kinda pricing. That thing ended up being awfully expensive for what it was. If they can bring it in at close to the price of their last street legal CRF250, then I think they’ll definitely have something good on their hands.

    • chad west

      I see what your saying but they would miss out on money from people who are my age (below 20) .the 500s insurance was way higher than the ninja 300 and cbr 250

  • Ayabe

    Cripes just spend the extra $1600 and get the 500R – it’s way more motorcyle and still learner friendly. If you can’t handle one of those then you shouldn’t be riding, first bike or not. Honda should have killed the 250 and tried to find a way to knock $500 off the 500′s.

    Perhaps my disdain for the Ninja 300 is coming through – the value isn’t there, even coming in a few hundred cheaper I think that holds true of the 300R as well.

    Prior to 2013 and the new 500′s….sure maybe, but it’s a new market now.

  • http://batman-news.com Aaron

    Honda can go ahead and fuck off until the bring the CB650F over here.

    • Justin McClintock

      Tell us you how REALLY feel!

      • http://batman-news.com Aaron

        I mostly covered it. Hahaha.

    • steve

      http://powersports.honda.com/2014/cbr650f.aspx
      If by over here you mean in the states.

      • http://batman-news.com Aaron

        Yeah I saw that one. I’m sure it can be made naked with some work, but I would like to just buy it how I want it. A lot of the FZ6/FZ1 guys get the euro N kits to make them naked too.

        • steve

          yup the naked version does show off the pipes in a nice CB400 four tribute, without look retro.

          • http://batman-news.com Aaron

            I kind of like it, at least in pictures. Fits with angles.

  • James

    I am really disappointed with Honda ATM. I really want a CB500F but in Australia they are only offering the bike in red or tri-colour. REALLY? Two colours only? I don’t think choice has been that limited in the automotive industry since the Model T Ford’s famous “you can have any colour you like as long as its black” campaign.
    I like the look of the yellow on matt black. I like the plain matt black. I like the metallic black. I don’t think it would be too much for Honda to increase their choice to consumers…
    Whinge over.

  • KC

    I have an all black 2013 CBR250R ABS and it’s a nice, quick, nimble, well made motorcycle that has a bit of personality and character to it. That being said, I may jump to the Kawasaki Ninja 300 ABS. The Ninjas are better supported in the aftermarket, Kawasaki tends to keep a model going for years, and quite frankly, it looks less generic than this new CBR.

  • HeDidn’tWeDid

    The Vultus would OWN that TRON paint scheme….

    • Robert Horn

      Indeed.

      • HeDidn’tWeDid

        Damn…they really did it. Okay.

  • Adrastos34

    I would kill for Honda to make something like the Yamaha MT-09 with a V-4. I just want a new fun/sporty naked bike that has a V-4 and doesn’t cost 20,000 ish dollars. Price it at around 10-12K and I would buy one in a heartbeat.

    • http://batman-news.com Aaron

      Good luck with that one.

  • John Ash

    Honda has discontinued more interesting bikes than this.