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Categories: Galleries, Dailies

This Honda CBR250R was built for Ride for Kids by Gregg’s Customs. It’s difficult to pigeonhole the bike since it combines clip-ons with 19-inch flat track wheels and tires, but what it really demonstrates is how nice the little Honda can look shorn of its fairings and complete with a little cosmetic cut and paste. The best part? You could own this for just $5.

Photos: Sean Smith

Ride for Kids works to benefit the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation. Buy a $5 raffle ticket at any of the International Motorcycle Shows and and your money will go towards finding the cause of and cure for children’s brain tumors. Plus give you a chance to win this CBR.

Aside from the big wheels, it’s notable how close-to-stock this CBR250 remains. Both the tail section and tank remain unaltered and the stock suspension is retained. In addition to losing the fairings, considerable effort was spent in moving and hiding plumbing and electrics, leaving the naked frame and motor to look startlingly simple and clean.

Looking at the bike in person down in Long Beach, it was almost unbelievable that that’s a 250cc single sitting in the frame. My first guest was CRF450; it’s a big, nice-looking lump that I’ve never really gotten a good look at, hidden behind the CBR’s fairings. In fact, the whole bike looks so simple, purposeful and so like something that could come equipped with finance payments and a warranty that it has us wondering how long it’s going to be before Honda strips the CBR itself.

Built in Thailand and designed for the worldwide market, the CBR250 wears a fairing because that’s what consumers in large motorcycle markets like those in Asia demand. Here in the US, we benefit from the cheap price making bikes in those numbers can bring — it’s just $4k — but we also get stuck with something that doesn’t wear appropriate looks for our youth market. A naked bike reminiscent of Gregg’s work could be simple and cost effective to develop and would likely boost the CBR’s appeal among new riders here and in Europe. Ditch the R and do we have a new CB250?

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