This is the first official, full photo of the Honda NSF250R, released just moments ago. The “Next Racing Standard” (it was being called the Honda NRS250) is Honda’s new Moto3 entry and, as such, uses a 250cc, four-stroke, single-cylinder engine with a bore of 81mm and a 14,000cc rev limit. Power is likely in the low to mid-50bhp range and the total rider/machine weight can’t be less than 148kg/326 lbs. It’s kind of crazy to think the EBR 1190RS only weighs 34lbs more or so.

Like 125GP it looks like bikes like the NRS250 are going to be all about corner speed, not outright power. Competitive horsepower from the 81mm bore, four-valve, engines with their 14,000rpm rev limits is predicted to be in the low 50bhp range. Figuring in the 148kg/326lbs minimum weight (including the rider) that gives Moto3 bikes a power-to-weight ratio slightly behind something like a CBR600RR. Figuring a 77kg/170lbs rider, the 118bhp 600 has a power-to-weight ratio of .45bhp:1kg while the (presumably 54bhp) Moto3 bike’s is .36:1. Not exactly shabby for a tiny four-stroke.

Honda says,

"Replacing the current 2-stroke, 125 cc used in the GP125 class, Honda developed the new NSF250R as a machine for entry riders to participate in the battle, seizing the opportunity provided by the opening of the 4-stroke, 250 cc Moto3 category, which begins in 2012."

"With a mission of broadening the base for motorcycle motorsports cultivated by the RS125R, we aimed for a high-performance, lightweight, and compact racing machine that allows RS125R users to ride with the same sense of comfort and inherits important elements from the RS125R such as the ability to learn the basics for moving up from entry level to the MotoGP."

"As a leader of the NSF250R development, on top of seeing the NSF250R expand the base for 2-wheel motorsports, as the RS125R did, and sharing dreams and excitement with our customers by revitalizing the Moto3 class, our greatest joy would be for the machine to serve as a springboard in creating future MotoGP champion riders."

HRC

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