Norton_M28_concept.jpgArron Rogers, a Coventry University Vehicle Design graduate, thinks the key to creating a lightweight, high-performance motorcycle is simplification. Accordingly, exposed mechanical elements take the place of bodywork while the 499cc single-cylinder engine is used as a stressed member in the carbon fiber chassis. That engine uses a desmodromic valve drive — a technology originally patented by Norton in 1924 — in order to make an estimated 70bhp.
>norton_M28_concept-rear.jpgThe suspension is probably the most novel feature on the M28. While the
girder out front can now be considered commonplace for a concept bike,
the Virtual Pivot Point rear suspension, inspired by mountain bikes, is
the first of its kind we’ve seen. A linkage system designed to activate
the suspension differently depending on the kind of input received, it
allows the shock to be mounted closer to the center of gravity while
maintaining a progressive axle path and also minimizes chain growth.



Our favorite part of Arron’s design is the absence of a traditional
fuel tank and airbox — the former lies under the seat while the latter
is incorporated into the carbon frame rails — which means the area
above the engine is empty. This negative space subverts traditional
motorcycle design language in a pleasingly antagonistic way.

via The Kneeslider

comments powered by Disqus