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Category: Dailies

Swigz-TTXGP.jpg

But they only add up to 11.5kWh of capacity, meaning the LiFePO4
Lithium-Ion batteries aren't achieving great power density. The Swigz
Pro Racing Electric Superbike is going to need that capacity too if it's
going to use all its 194bhp and 295lb/ft (peak) during the 25-ish miles
of lapping Infineon next weekend; a Kinetic Energy Recovery System will
help.

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Based on a GSX-R750, Chip Yates' bike ditches the inline-four in favor the three clusters of batteries and a single liquid-cooled permanent magnet DC motor. Don't get too terribly excited about those power figures, they're peak, continuous output is most likely half those figures, making the MotoCzysz Electric D1g1tal Dr1ve (seriously Michael) look pretty good in comparison.

The Swigz bike will be using an all-in-one power management, traction control system capable of altering power delivery throughout the race in order to stretch the battery capacity as far as necessary. The goal in racing is to carry only enough energy to get you across the finish line, so such a system combined with KERS should help ensure that the bike delivers the most power possible without running out before the finish.

What's the reason for the multi-location battery pack? All the batteries likely couldn't fit between the frame rails without compromising ground clearance, this arrangement seems like a reasonable compromise between packaging, aerodynamics and center of gravity.

PlugBike has full specs and more pictures, make sure you check them out.

We'll be bringing you live coverage from America's first TTXGP race next weekend. See you there? Here's a $10 coupon for tickets

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